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Civil War
Rare First Edition-Third U S Colored Infantry
Item #: NEW-007316

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First edition, dated 1908, The Story of the Third U. S. Colored Cavalry by Edward M Main. Globe Printing in Louisville Kentucky. This is an exceptionally rare regimental history, which I am pricing at less than half of the last retail price that I saw it offered for several years ago due to the condition problems. Note what looks like an ink stain on the closed pages. Ink extends a little into the top edge on all the pages to varying degrees. Note the title page where an attempt was made to cover up the largest stain. Also present on the fly pages and index but becomes less of a problem on the ensuing pages. Small crack on the interior spine page.

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1903 ALS-Confederate General Thomas Benton Smith
Item #: NEW-007087

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This is a one sheet note/letter, written on both sides and signed by Brigadier General Thomas Benton Smith, dated 1903. Written on lined stationary paper with wear and some separation to the folds, along with some stains. Here is a brief history of Benton Smith, who began with such promise, achieved so much in battle, and ended so tragically. Smith was born in Mechanicsville Tennessee in 1838. A bright young man with a gift of mechanical inventiveness, he received a patent for a locomotive pilot at the age of 15. He enrolled in the Nashville Military Academy (Western Military Institute) He was working for the Nashville & Decatur Railroad when the war broke out. He gave up that job to help raise a company of volunteers in and around Triune. That company merged with a group raised by Joel A Battle and eventually became Company B of the 20th Tennessee Infantry. Saw combat action in the Battle of Mill Springs and Shiloh. Later promoted to Colonel at the age of 22. Wounded seriously in the Battle of Murfreesboro-Stones River and was out of action for much of 1863. Resumed field duties and led his troops at Baton Rouge, Hoover's Gap & Chickamauga when he was again wounded. . Was promoted to Brigadier General on July 29,1864 becoming the youngest General in the Army of Tennessee. At the battle of Franklin, his staff officer Tod Carter was killed within sight of his home and Smith informed the parents and searched the battlefield for his body. During the battle of Nashville, Smith surrendered and was captured by Union Colonel William L McMillan who beat Smith about the head with Smith's own sword, leaving his brain exposed and in a comma. Smith was not expected to live but recovered only to become a prisoner at Fort Warren. Released July 24th, 1865. Smith did some railroad work after the Civil War and ran for a seat in the U S Congress in 1870, but lost. Struggling with the permanent damage he suffered to his brain, Smith spent his last 47 years in an insane asylum in Nashville, appearing occasionally at UCV reunions. This note was written from the "insane asylum" now known as Central State Hospital, and I think reflects his mental confusion. I was unable to make out all the content. ? 18th, 1902 James Buck Smith and myself began the Latin & Greek Language under Washington McLaughlin 1850 later ? Tom was burnt to death after I moved to Triune to study Latin Greek and Hebrew under E L Crocker of Massachusetts Signed Tom Benton Smith President John W Thomas V P" (Nashville Railroad President) End of page 1 page 2 "I write a good hand up to the time I went to New York to take sessions(?) under Horace Greeley now my hand is like a hens scratch or the sanskrit Thomas Dickersen is hereby appointed..." I can only make out some of the rest of this Also scanned is an example of Smith's autograph taken from Jim Hayes's book, War Between the States, Autographs and Biographical Sketches. This example is also a post war signature

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Fantastic CDV-Battle of Murfreesboro
Item #: NEW-007032

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No paypal on this item. This is a very rare image of Union soldiers in action at the Battle of Murfreesboro. Period handwriting at the bottom reads, "Battery Mitchell Murfreesboro." Mitchell is possibly Union General Robert Mitchell. Backmark reads Butler, Bonsall & Company Army Photographers, General Rousseau's Division. I believe the coloring in the top part of the sky area is smoke from the cannons. Artillery Stone's River Note: this image was identified as being Fortress Rosecrans as some of the works shown were made after the Battle of Murfreesboro and no doubt was a training exercise.

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Outstanding Macon Georgia UCV Ribbon-1898
Item #: NEW-007027

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Scarce gray silk ribbon bearing the image of William McKinley who is being welcomed by the Bibb County Camp, Confederate Veterans, Macon Georgia, December 19, 1898. Please view the scan. When held up to the light one can see three places where the ribbon is separated. There are also two pinkish spots and pin holes at the top. The ribbon measures nine inches long.

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1863 Letter-104th Ohio Infantry-Knoxville Campaign
Item #: NEW-006997

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This is the second letter written by Andrew J Moon. Small format four page letter on patriotic stationary written on Sept 27th 1863 to his sister. See the scan to view the condition problems. This letter covers part of Burnsides's campaign in East Tennessee.place. "we have just got back from another raid similar to the one we took to Cumberland gap but we did not get as many prisoners as we did at the gap. we started this day a week ago (Sunday) we took the cars at 3 o'clock pm we rode all night on the cars (no sleep) until found ourselves at Morristown at daylight we lay there until in the afternoon waiting on a train to come up with our rations they came up about 5 o'clock pm and we started on for Johnson's Stations a distance of 40 miles further we got to our journeys end and on the cars a little after dusk we then got off the cars and got supper and marched 5 miles to camp site we was both tired and sleepy then we went 28 miles the next day and we was to our journey's end the eve we got there General Burnside sent in a flag of truce telling them to surrender they send him back word they waited until the next morning to consider which he granted them but morning came to no signs of surrender so we got up got breakfast and started for the battle field which was about two miles in full preparation for a fight. The musicians left music back and was carrying stretches along with them to carry the dead and wounded back on indeed it was to be more like a fight than anything we have yet seen since we came out to but when we got there the Rebs had burned the bridge over the Catabaugh river and left on the double quick. They went into Virginia there was only about 3 thousand of them Our march was ? from the time left until we got back we marched 60 miles and the rest we rode on the R R. we made in 5 days I heard yesterday that Bragg is badly whipped and we took a large amount of prisoners...I guess we will get to go home soon or at least I hope so we are all well .. Moon mustered into Company C on August 30 1862. He was wounded in action and discharged for his wounds on May 18,1865, less than a month before his regiment mustered out of service. The 104th Ohio saw action at Lexington, Atlanta, Rocky Faced Ridge, Dallas, New Hope Church, Kennesaw, Nashville, Franklin and Wilmington.

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1863 Letter-Knoxville Tn-104th Ohio Infantry
Item #: NEW-006986

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Four page letter from Andrew J Moon of the 104th Ohio Infantry, Company C. View the scans for the condition which includes some separations at the folds. Letter is written to his sister, describing the surrender of the Cumberland Gap by the Confederate forces. ...We got here to Knox on the 4th of this month we only stayed here over night until we was ordered to Cumberland Gap a distance of 60 miles. We marched it in two days and a half we got there about 10 o'clock on the 9th Major General Burnside then gave the rebs until 3 o'clock PM to surrender at which time they did unconditionally they marched down out of the gap something of over two thousand of them and stacked arms before the 104 Ohio Regiment we had them to guard that night and part of the next day then the 129th Ohio VI started with them to Camp Chase and we started back to Knox we would no doubt have had a hard fight there had they not surrendered for it is a hard place to take they have had that place ever since the war broke out, we got over two thousand prisoners about that many stand up arms. 80 herd of mules several hundred pounds of pork six pieces of artillery and different other things too tedious to mention then while we was doing that the 10th OVI started down into Va and got in to a fight there with about 6 times their numbers and got whipped and two or three hundred prisoners taken... I suppose you have heard of William Conals death...he died with the consumption... Moon mustered into Company C on August 30 1862. He was wounded in action and discharged for his wounds on May 18,1865, less than a month before his regiment mustered out of service. The 104th Ohio saw action at Lexington, Atlanta, Rocky Faced Ridge, Dallas, New Hope Church, Kennesaw, Nashville, Franklin and Wilmington.

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Ultra Rare Confederate Veteran Lot-Identified Tenn Soldier
Item #: NEW-006558

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Two items in this lot which include a certificate from the Association of Confederate Soldiers of Tennessee, an organization that pre-dates the United Confederate Veteran Association. The certificate measures 24 by 19 inches. It has been encapsulated on acid free paper backing and was deacidified. Certificate is issued to William A McKay "volunteered in the Confederate Army, joining Company J Eighteenth Regiment Tenn Infantry on the 13 day of July 1861..was honorably paroled on the 10th day of May 1865 at the time of parole-corporal and has been duly admitted to Frank Cheatham Bivouac no 1 located in Nashville Tennessee. March 7, 1892. Signed by John Shields, Secretary and R G Nott??? President." These certificates are very scarce and most do not have the photograph of the soldier present. Note the colorful vignettes as well as an image of the rare ribbon badge of this Association. On the opposing side is an embossed seal of the Association and signatures of the state officials-Hickman is one of the names and can't quite read the other. Description of the condition: Please ignore the strange areas which are reflections caused by the glass. Water stain in upper left hand corner area, chipping along the edges, heavy acidic staining which runs vertically and large circular spot to right of the flag at top. Scattered small holes and acidic toning caused by wood backing of the frame. There is also a tape strip over one of the three ribbons handing from the embossed seal. Still very appealing visually. The second item is even rarer than the certificate and missing in collections of major UCV collectors known to me. Large lapel pin of the Association which is identified on the back as belonging to McKay. See scan to view the missing area of the white enamel on the pin. It is also missing whatever was hanging off the chain. I will need to compute the shipping. The certificate will not be mailed in the frame and the lapel pin will be mailed separately. Here is a brief history of the 18 Tennessee Infantry: 18th Infantry Regiment completed its organization at Camp Trousdale, Tennessee, in June, 1861, and in July had 883 men present for duty. Its members were raised in the counties of Cannon, Sumner, Davidson, Rutherford, Cheatham, Wilson, and Bedford. The unit moved to Bowling Green, Kentucky, then Fort Donelson where it was captured in February, 1862. Exchanged and reorganized, the 18th was assigned to Pillow's, J.C. Brown's, Brown's and Reynolds' Consolidated, and Palmer's Brigade, Army of Tennessee. During October, 1863, the unit was consolidated with the 26th Regiment. It participated in the campaigns of the army from Murfreesboro to Atlanta and returned to Tennessee with Hood, but it was not engaged at Franklin and Nashville. Later it was involved in the North Carolina Campaign. The regiment reported 52 casualties of the 685 at Fort Donelson, then lost thirty-one percent of the 430 at Murfreesboro and forty-one percent of the 330 at Chickamauga. In December, 1863, the 18th/26th totalled 423 men and 290 arms and sustained many losses at Atlanta. Later the 18th was consolidated with the 3rd Volunteers and on December 21, 1864, there were 12 men fit for duty. It was included in the surrender on April 26, 1865. The field officers were Colonel Joseph B. Palmer, Lieutenant Colonels William R. Butler and Albert G. Carden, and Majors Samuel W. David and William H. Joyner.

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1862 Report-Wounded Soldiers-Ft Donelson
Item #: NEW-006543

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This report was from the Clarksville Female Academy Hospital, dated 1862. This is an unlisted Tennessee imprint. The scan bears no resemblence to the actual item which I can't get my scanner to stop adjusting the color. This three page report is on thin blue rage paer with folds and some tears. Acidic stain across the top. Very rare report of the expenditures of the Citizens Committee formed to treat the wounded soldiers of the Fort Donelson battle-both Union and Confederate. The citizens of Clarksville Tennessee rallied quickly to give care to the unprecedented influx of injured soldiers after the fall of Ft. Donelson and the evacuation of the Confederate forces. 200 wounded were left in the local hospitals. Here is some of the content, "In the absence of Army physicians surgeons, nurses etc a meeting of the citizens was held, a committee appointed and the committee empowered to take charge of the Hospital, superintend its operations and to provide everything necessary to the wants of the patients. Dr. Joshua Cobb was chosen chairman of that committee....When the Federal troops took possession of Clarksville and placed a guard over the Hospital, Dr. Cobb was re-appointed surgeon in charge and general superintendent by Col. Craft J Wright, then commandant of the Post and became responsible uon the removal of the guard, and a number of the patients, as prisoners of war, for the parolling of as many of the remainder as might recover."...Further discussion of the collection of funds among the citizens and how the generous contributions had been exausted and that $600 was the remaining debt. The Committe further gave thanks to Dr. L B Hickman of Elkton Kentucky who "labored among the patients," and other Doctors, Lowrey, Jefferson, Goodman, Grooms, Bass and McReynolds, all from Kentucky. Kudos also to Dr. Alex McCown of Louisville. "Mnistering Angels"Miss Banche Lewis and Miss Eliza Adams were also recognized by the committee. Two pages are a breakdown of the expenditures.

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Letter Lot-Lt Col Henry C Merwin-27th Conn Vol-KIA-Gettysburg
Item #: NEW-006508

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Included in this lot are three letters, with covers written by Lt Col Henry C Merwin who was Commander of the 27th Connecticut Volunteers Regiment. Merwin was killed in the Battle of Gettysburg on July 2nd 1863. Here is a brief history of this event. On July 1, 1863 the 27th Connecticut was 3 to 4 miles from Gettysburg Pa. By July 2nd the regiments was stationed north of Little Round Top on Cemetery Ridge. At about 4 PM on July 2nd the Regiment advanced to Wheat field Lane, experiencing heavy fighting there during which Merwin was killed. More than one-half of their fighting force was reportedly lost that day. The first letter is dated May 16, 1861 to his Mother. Patriotic letterhead which shows an engraving of the Treasury Building in Washington DC. Three pages in pencil and quite legible. The Cover is in poor condition with the stamp cut off and the cancel showing DC clearly and the rest unclear. Here is some of the content: My Dear Mother, I am just through supper. It is now one half past six. Some of our boys have gone down to the brook to wash, but as I was not very dirty, I thought, I had better write to you. By the way I must tell you how our camp is. It is most two miles from the City. Our officers tents are on the top of a hill. Ours are on the side, south side I think. We are right in the woods, so the sun can not hurt us much. Just at the foot of the hill is a small stream where we must do most of our washing. I am now outside of my tent sitting on my rubber blanket, leaning my back against a fine tree. My knapsack makes a desk. Our camp is only a few steps from the 1st Regt.,..Had a number of NH gents in our camp, Hon J Woodruff, G Lawton, Capt Scranton, John Coburn, brother of Jim. Last night about six o'clock Dick Bostwick, Bassett Chapman, Chainly, Joe, Charley & myself went over to a farm house about 1/4 of a mile from camp and they gave us a splendid supper and we had a very nice time...more personal comments, Henry. The second letter has a complete cover and letter. Cover is written & signed by Lt Col Henry Merwin to Mrs. J E Merwin Son/New Haven/Conn Cancel reads Washington DC. Stamp is affixed and is hand annotated "Leiut Col H. C. Berwin/27th Reg. C.V. 3rd Brigade 1st Division 2nd Army/Washington". Letter is headed "27th C.V.". Very brief letter written to his sister and signed Henry. "Yours the favor of Lt. Brooks arrived this morn. The collars were just the thing. They are splendid. I do not feel much like writing this eve as I have just got in from Picket this afternoon just as Peterson starts for home in the morning. I will send a line. Supposed you have seen Frank before this. I do not think I shall be home until our time is out. Sam sent a can of clams. We had some for dinner. I tell you how we did smack out lips. I will write to Mother tomorrow eve if I feel bright. Love to all. The final letter in this lot also has its cover, which is free franked "Soldiers Letter, H C Merwin Lieut Col 27th Ct" with a "DUE 3" black cancel. The letter is headed "Head Quarters 27th CT. Camp Near Falmouth Jan 18th 1863. Addressed to Dear Mother & Sister," Partial content reads ....We are ready to move at a moments notice and I think we will have to start soon. Which way and for which I cannot tell. But I hope we shall not get whipped. I think it is time for us to have some luck. I am very glad Sophie attended the funeral of Sgt Russell. He was a fine fellow and a brave soldier, he done well on the field. I remember seeing him urging the men of his Company on. We have sent out some men this eve with picks & shovels. I suppose they are going to through up earth works in Falmouth for batteries....We have many sick with us now and all are getting along nicely, I think. Our army corp was reviewed by General Burnside yesterday. Very few of the brigades cheered him Only one Regt in our Brigade. That was t

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ALS-Official LH & Cover-General John Gordon
Item #: NEW-006431

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Personal letter from "The Governor's Office" Atlanta Georgia, dated August 10,1880 signed by John B Gordon. Official Executive Department cover accompanies the letter. Ink smears where Gordon folded the letter before the ink had dried. There is also a ink stain at the bottom of the letter which does not show in the scan. Content of the letter to John W Park, Greenville Georgia is thanking him for a letter praising him for a speech he had given in Greenville. Gordon of course was not only Governor of Georgia but a respected Confederate General.

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Albumen-General Stephen D Lee-UCV Reunion
Item #: NEW-006389

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This mounted photograph measures 8 and a half by 6 and a half inches. General Lee is on horseback at what I have been told was an Atlanta Georgia reunion. You can read UCV on the horses's blanket. Lee is wearing some reunion badges. Only problem is the ink identification on the photograph. Back reads "Gen Steven D Lee reviewing troops at 6th and Jefferson St." Also some ink writing which reads "Confederate Reunion and can't read the other message."

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Stonewall Jackson-CDV-Vannerson Back Mark
Item #: NEW-006363

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Corner missing on the photo at top left hand edge. Not an engraving but highly retouched. See scans to view the condition

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Brady CDV-Robert E Lee
Item #: NEW-006344

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Brady backmark on this possibly last image of Confederate General Robert E Lee. Trimmed somewhat at the top. Ink identification of Lee on the photo. This is an original, from life photograph.

Shipping Weight: 0.13 lb
Price: $885.50 USD
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Occupation Newspaper-Clarksville Tennessee
Item #: NEW-006315

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Rare newspaper, The Clarksville Gazette, dated May 28 1864. Paper opens up to four printed pages around 19 and a half by twelve inches. Missing area at the bottom right hand corner and pencil additions on the back page at bottom edge. Rag paper with folds, moderate foxing and some stains. Tear at one edge. Contains some news relating to the war but not much. There are also ads from Clarksville businesses. I doubt if there are many of these papers around. This paper was from Stanley Horne's collection.

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Jeb Stuart CDV-Vannerson Jones Backmark
Item #: NEW-006311

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Desirable Southern backmark on this pose of Confederate General Jeb Stuart. View the scan to see the condition of the photograph. There is a deep indentation line in the middle of the mount which does not extend to the photo

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Theodore Cooley-Confederate Veteran Photo
Item #: NEW-006136

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This great mounted albumen of Theodore Cooley, an important Nashville citizen was purchased from Herb Peck, hence the high price. I lusted after this photograph for a few years and each time I asked the price, it had gone up. There is a problem of the tears in the board which almost goes into the photograph, but not quite. This is an Otto Giers photograph, bearing his signature on the front. Cooley has inscribed the back which reads, "With all the glories of the past, Yours truly, Theo Cooley", 1900. I believe this photograph was most likely taken at the Confederate Reunion held in Nashville Tennessee in 1896 in conjunction with the Tennessee Centennial Exposition. The back has two strips of old scotch tape which I'm going to let someone else remove. In this photo Cooley is holding a copy of the Confederate Veteran magazine and is wearing a ribbon that I have never seen before. I can read Nashville, there is a celluloid disc of the State Capitol and a circle of Confederate Generals and it looks like Lee in the middle. The bottom of the ribbon reads Chairman of the Badge Committee. The issue of the Confederate Veteran with the article about Cooley will be included. This was an obituary on Cooley. Here is some history of Cooley. He enlisted in the Rock City Guards which became part of the 1st Tennessee Confederate Volunteers. He participated in the early campaigns under Robert E Lee in West Virginia. He was then appointed captain the the quartermaster's department and assigned to the purchasing supplies. In December 1864 he was captured near Decatur Alabama, brought to Nashville and confined in the old State prison used by the Union. He was later transferred to Fort Delaware, where he was held till the close of the war. Cooley was a very active citizen in Nashville. He was chairman of the Art Committee for the Tennessee Expo. He was an active and faithful member of the Frank Cheatham Bivouac, UCV, a Mason, Knights of Pythias, and Royal Arcanum.

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Second-Privations of a Private-Marcus Toney
Item #: NEW-006100

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This thin volume of a Tennessee regimental history written by Marcus Toney is a presentation copy by the author to William H Bumpus of Nashville Tennessee. Toney was a soldier and an active member of Company B of Tennessee Confederate veterans. This is the second, revised edition printed in 1907. There is a large stamp on inside cover whixh says "Library of Wm H. Bumpus, Nashville, Tn." He also has ink stamped one of the interior pages. Tightly bound but considerable shelf wear to spine, turned in edges, and some wrinkling and light dinginess on the boards.

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Rare KKK Hero Cross-Nathan Bedford Forrest
Item #: NEW-006073

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The Hero cross was the highest award the Klan could give to their members. Circa 1920-40's. The dates 1866 and 1915 appear on the front which reflect the year the Klan began and 1915 was the date the organization was revived. The image of course is of Gen. N. B. Forrest who was the first Grand Wizard of the Klan. Medal repels a magnet. Silver finish but may be a silver coating over bronze. Striking is very crisp including the tiny Whitehead Hoag marking. Scan is not true in this respect. This is certainly not one of the recent reproductions being seen today. Purchased about 12 years ago along with a very rare KKK Badge. There were two other vintage KKK items being offered by the seller. Selling this as authentic and if not, money back guarantee. Ku Klux Klan

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2nd Ky U S Reg-C A Zachary-Fantastic Battle Content Letter
Item #: SPL00001

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No paypal on this item though payment plans can be arranged.  

This by far is the best battle letter that I have ever had.  It had been listed previously for a long time but as I recently discovered, without numerous pages of the second letter which has the most battle content. I had corrected this at one time but it appeared again without the additions through some error.  

This lot consists of two letters covering fighting in Tennessee, including the Battle of Murfreesboro (Stones River) Some of the spelling has been corrected. A very interesting and informative book concerning this unit and the writer of these letters is also included. See information at end of listing. 

 The first letter is dated March 22, 1862 written from Columbia Tennessee and is signed by Lieutenant C A Zachary (later promoted to Captain). Four pages of mostly legible writing. Zachary didn't use periods but I have inserted them for easier reading, Here is the content: 

Captain M E Ingram Dear sir, We are getting down in the sunny South as you can see from the heading of this. The weather is still cold it snowed here yesterday. I hoped it would be warmer than the North. Tennessee is one of the finest farming country I ever saw. The rebels has not suffered in the country for something to eat. Our regiment has advanced.  We reached this place first and had a fight with the Rebel Pickets but they did not hit any of us.  They fired and run like race horses.  We chased them with our cavalry killing one and taking 13 prisoners.  They had burned the bridge across Duck River at Columbia.  About 50 of the rebels swam the river and fired several shots at us across the river.  The city authority feared we would shell the town and hoisted the white flag and surrender to Col Buckner (probably Allen Buckner).  This is the only fun I have had yet. I am not afraid of being shot by the rebels if they shot like they did at us.  They was scared nearly to death and their shots passed 20 feet over our heads.  We have stopped here a few days to build the bridge and soon as it is done we will start for Decatur Alabama which is 75 miles south of this place on the Tennessee River. We are now 45 miles south of Nashville.  Our force is large.  I do not know how many.  They look like they could eat the whole ? up in a day or two.  At Least you would thnk so if you could see them.  The troops is not allowed to ever burn a rail here and you cannot snap off  one of the fences south of Nashville.  The rebels burn all the bridges and the roads as they go. 

I am in good health and would like to hear from home but I do not know whom to tell you to direct your letters but you can risk them to Columbia Tennessee I may get them. Sam Hunt is in Nashville some of the boys saw him but I did not. I saw A O Leonier ? and ? I did not see nor hear of Bob and Green Woodcock. Haskins and B? was at Nashville. I camped with Will Gibson and Capt. J M Hewitt (B Ky Light Artillery) one night 3 miles this side of Nashville and also Frank Fishback and Clint Tuttle. They were all with our reg will be paid off next Monday We will have plenty of money then I am well pleased with my position now we are to have the advance we are attached to General Johnson’s brigade (Richard W Johnson) You may rest assured that our boys will fight.  They all stood well and 17 of them swam across the river thru the burning bridge when it was in a high blaze and caught 3 rebels on the other side.  They seemed not to think of damage.  We do not know who the rebels are now some of their men come to camp everyday and give them selves up and say that the south is nearly played out.  It is supposed they will make a stand at decatur.  Give my regards to all my friends. I will not be home till I am discharged …Your bro Lieut C A Zachary. C A Zachary is listed as a Captain F Company in the 2nd Regiment Kentucky Calvary USA.

 The second letter is dated December 9th 1862 written from Murfreesboro Tennessee. Legal sized stationary and content covers all four pages. Poor condition to the letter with wear and separations and holes as can be seen in one example that I scanned.

 Our brigade wagon reached us today.  I rest for a short time.   I have just felt like myself again.  I do not at all feel the effects of my exposure.  I have not slept in a tent or house for 15 days and it is now mid winter and hailing but I will have shelter now as our tents is here.

We have had an awful battle too desperate to describe but the gods of fortune seems to smile upon me and my little command.  We have been in the fight all the time and made several charges to save our flanks without the loss of a single man when hundreds fell that men left exposed of our division and many of our Regt Captain (Miller) McCulloch was torn nearly in to atoms by a cannon ball.  On Wednesday when our right wing was burned by the enemy and driven back in confusion and the cavalry that was on our right were being drove back hard pursued by the Rebel cavalry our gallant old division came to their rescue and at the same time two companies of our Reg made a charge in to the enemy flanking Reg which turned the tide of battle in our favor.  The feat was a desperate one to perform but some one was compelled to take it.  It fell to my lot to lead the charge with my company.  I was in command of my company and had only thirty six men with me but thirty six brave and cooler boys never charged a line.  We started in a trot firing as we went right up to the right flank of the enemy lines and when we got in about ten paces of them, we dropped our ? and drew out pistol halted and fired through their ranks cutting them and ? at every volley.  We then drew sabers and charged them in their lines cutting right and left shooting and shouting like so many Indians.  We broke their lines in twain threw them in confusion which caused a perfect stampede they run over each other and we drove our houses at full speed over the living and the dead.  All was confusion of their cavalry caused their whole line to give way...By this we saved the day and drove the enemy beyond their their fore positions.  It was with difficulty that I stopped my men after we had pursued the Cavalry to the rear of their infantry and when our bugles blew the halt the sun now went down on a bloody field we did not fight any more that day but were wide awake all night but all remained quiet through the night. 

 General (Rousseau) said that this was the most successful and most gallant charge of the ?  Next day sent to the left and got our left flank but nothing occurred until Friday evening excepting occasional skirmish with our pickets all though there had been several hard contest fight on our right and center but on Friday about two hours by Sunday our time came again.  A time and place that tried men’s nerves.  The enemy had been massing their forces on our left under John Breckenridge and against Gen Tom Crittenden.  Both Kentucky high bloods.  The enemy determined to make a more desperate and death struggle.  All at once they made their appearance from the woods across the field they came out in columns of Regiments their bayonets glittering, looking like the glistening of the sun on the waves of a vast sea of water.  Their officers gallop up and down their lines giving commands.  And they came now not more than a half mile distant.  The silence is now broken by our masked batteries which ?  Their heavy columns a desperate charge cutting lane after lane through them but to no effect  they close up the gap and some on as before as if nothing had happened  our canonories work harder and shoot ten times faster.  Now whole companies are swept away by grape and canister but they close up and on they came firing and shouting as they came nothing checks them.  Now one solid sheet of fire blaze from the long line of our concealed solid sheet of fire blaze from the long line of our concealed infantry.  They halt for a moment ? by hundreds they soon reform their lines and on the come.  As before now they are fearfully near our batteries are compelled to fall back the roaring now cease for a moment.  Nothing heard but shouts of men and valleys of musketry...? Our boys are over ? and out numbered they begin to break ranks and fall back in confusion.  We are drawn up in line on the extra left awaiting our time in breathless silence and suspense.  Our batteries again gained a new position.  One of them nears us boom boom they go again faster and louder than ever, shaking the very earth beneath us.  Hundreds of our cowards came streaming by us hollering we are whipped we are cut all to pieces.  Our boys then turn pale .  The first thing I said don’t be scared we are not whipped yet shot and shell were then whistling fast and thick above our heads but our well trained houses did not move  it seemed to me as if the heavens had turned loose all the artillery.  Our retreating lines now fall back in the reserve.  General Rousseau gallant old division they halt and now rally their broken ranks the enemy now come in contact of new enemy, they confuse and tangle like sheep they break they run at our boys charge after them shouting and shooting the enemy now had to retreat over the entire ground over which they had advanced cut down at every step and ? by our artillery.  We passed them 1 1/2 miles it is now dark they escaped under the cover of night.  Their cavalry did not engage us  we held them in check consequently we did not fire a gun we held our line for their cavalry.  This ends another terrible struggle and again General Rousseau saved the day.  The enemy go back to their camp dishearten.  Bragg commences his evacuation of the place by Sunday morning those all ? are cut up considerable but Braggs army is cut all to pieces.  (This ends the letter with no signature)   

Cahrales A. Zachary

Residence was not listed; 
Enlisted on 2/8/1863 at Murfreesboro, TN as a 2nd Lieutenant.

On 4/23/1863 he was commissioned into "F" Co. KY 2nd Cavalry 
He was discharged on 10/12/1864


Promotions:
* Capt 9/6/1862 


Sources used by Historical Data Systems, Inc.:

 - Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Kentucky
(c) Historical Data Systems, Inc. @ www.civilwardata.com


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Dynamite Armed Confederate CDV
Item #: NEW-005928

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This is hands down the greatest Confederate image that I have ever purchased. Paid too much for it to keep, though I would like to. This soldier is all geared up for war and the image must have been made very early in the war since notation of the back reads "captured at Fort Donelson". Unfortunately the reb is not identified nor is there a photographer's back mark. He is equipped with a Halls rifle, there seems to be a side arm peeking out and of course his D guard bowie knife with a sheath. Thanks to John Walsh of Fort Donelson Relics for the identification of this early rifle, rarely used in the Civil War. He is wearing a Nashville Depot jacket or a Columbus one or even possibly even a Richmond. One can only guess with no identification but he could have served with Floyd's army and the rifle could have been obtained from the Harper's Ferry arsenal. No Paypal on this item though payment plan can be arranged.

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Rare Tn Regimental History-Seventh Tn Calvary
Item #: NEW-005883

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Very tough first edition in the orignial binding and a presentation copy by the author, James P Young, to the parents of one of his officers "In loving memory of Lieut R J Black Seventh Tenn Calvary, Forrest Division, CSA. Published by the author, M E Church, Nashville Tennessee 1890. (Bio of Black follows description of the condition of this book) Very heavy wear to the spine edges with the brown worn off. Faded gilt on the title. Heavy wear to the corners with bown cover worn off. Front fly page loose. Interior clean but stains, which may be ink present on the closed pages. Robert Black with Forrest throughout the war, serving in the elite "Forrest Escort." He was wounded three times in battle--cut at Lockridge's Mill, TN, 5/5/62; shot through the left leg in a cavalry charge near Hernando, MS 6/16/63; and shot through the left arm while preparing to capture Union City, TN, 4/24/64. He, with "Black's Tennessee Scouts," was first to encounter the federal troops at what historian's consider to be Forrest's best victory at Brices Cross Road, MS, June, 1864. Robert survived the bloody defeat at Franklin, TN, 11/30/64. Lindsley reports that November 29, 1864, the "brigade . . . took part . . . with the infantry under Cleburne in the attack at Spring Hill. . . . On the 30th the brigade was dispatched west to Carter's Creek turnpike to guard the Confederate left flank, and that afternoon drove in the federal pickets on the extreme left at Franklin, maintaining a hot fight with their outer lines until night." Robert was paroled with the 7th Cavalry in Gainesville, Alabama, May 11, 1865. (Lindsley and Young state that the Seventh was not at Fort Pillow in April 1864, where black federal troops and "home grown Yankees" were mostly all killed in a vicious episode.) After the war Robert located in Memphis, served as Clerk and Master of the Chancery Court from 1878 to 1884, was President of the Security Bank of Memphis, Vice-President of the Memphis Abstract Company, a member of the firm R. J. Black and Co., Real Estate, vice-president of the Woodruff Lumber Company, and a director in the following boards: Mercantile Bank, Phoenix Insurance Co., Workingmen's Building and Loan Association, the Memphis Bethel. Robert was successful and a leader in Memphis business.

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Athens Georgia Confederate Paper-Southern Banner
Item #: NEW-005859

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Large format newspaper which opens up and has four pages of print. Good condition except for the area shown in the scan which goes through both pages but no loss of content. Moderate overall foxing . I have been told that this is a rare Confederate newspaper. Date is January 15, 1862. It is almost exclusively news about the war and Ga soldiers. There is an auction notice where slaves were being offered for sale.  

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Identified Southern Cross
Item #: NEW-005803

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I have struggled with whether or not this is a g or a j on the name. I believe it is g l Duncan. I bought this along with several other renuion badges, mostly from Virginia, from a book dealer in Delaware.

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1924 LH-Knights of the Ku Klux Klan-Forrest's Son
Item #: NEW-005774

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Interesting letter dated July 7 1924 to W T Jacobs of Bell Buckle Tennessee. "attached plese find copy of communication from Gen. N B Forrest, Grand Dragon, Realm of Georgia in reference to Harry Wand. This man is not a Klansman nor is he a kleagle nor does he have any connection with the state office or the Imperial Palace." Goes on an on as to how he has no connection to the Klan. "get in touch with this man and demand of him his credentials that he claims to possess. He is to be treated as an imposter and should be treated as such. ALL KLANSMEN WILL GOVERN THEMSELVES ACCORDINGLY." I believe this can be construed as a threat. I was unaware that Nathan Bedford Forrest son, or possibly grandson played a role in the modern reorganization of the KKK. Folds, some edge tears. The paper relating to measuring oneself for a KKK robe is a throw in as well as the vintage felt patch.

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Rare Item-Tennessee Prepares for War-Tenn Rangers
Item #: NEW-005665

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Heavy stock paper item, advertising the Broadway Hotel on Broad Street in Nashville Tennessee. W N Hackney, Prioprietor. "This house is now open for the reception of travelers and boarders. It is situated near the Nashville and Decatur R R Depot, and convenient to the Steamboat Landing." On the reverse side it reads John F Vaught of Tennessee Rangers-Saturday 27th April 1861. Paid to Sunday 5th of May. This particular soldier enlisted in Confederate service in the Infantry 1st Regiment, Tennessee Infantry (Feild's) Tennessee seceded from the Union on May 6th. The Tennessee Rangers were the predecessors of 1st (McNAIRY'S) TENNESSEE CAVALRY BATTALION Also called 1st West Tennessee Cavalry Battalion and 1st Middle Tennessee Cavalry Battalion.

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Rare Memphis Tennessee UCV Postcard
Item #: NEW-005451

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This great card announces the United Confederte Verteran Reunion to be held in Memphis in 1909. Postally cancelled May 16, 1909. Shows The Wizard of the Saddle, the statue of General Nathan Bedford Forrest and his famous horse, King Phillip. Ink notation on the side says, " ride our best horse in the Parade." Some stains and minor wear to the corners.

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POW Letter-Camp Douglas-4th Mississippi Infantry
Item #: NEW-005297

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Written from "Military Prison in Indianapolis Ind June 27, 1862" Two page letter, front to back, signed by D. G. Heslep, Company H, 4th Regiment, Mississippi Infantry. Heslep was captured at Fort Donelson according to the letter."I was taken prisioner at Donelson and have been at this place ever since... Oh how it makes a man feel to be placed in my present situation cut off from all communication with those who fell near and dear to me but I have one consolation that there is a better day coming." Personal and request for money.

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First Edition-Hancock's Diary-Rare Tn Regimental
Item #: NEW-005296

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Author of this rare book is Richard Hancock a soldier in McNairy's command. This tough Tennessee Regimental history was owned by a Confederate officer for F N McNairy's command, First Cavalry. E.D. Hicks, Lieutenant and Adjutant for General Zollicoffer, who was his Uncle. Inside cover bears his signature and also the library plate of another owner. This is a large glued in plate bearing the Title and logo of the United States Naval Institue. This however is not a library copy. At the bottom it reads, "From the library of C. William Green." Green married Hicks's grand daughter. See scans to view to view the condition of the boards. Back cover has the same condition problems. Corners worn and turned inward. Tightly bound. Clean interior except for some of the individual pages containing the roster of the units. This true first edition by R R Hancock, a soldier with the Second Tennessee Confederate Cavalry, was printed by Brandon Printing Co in Nashville Tennessee in 1887. Contains all of the 20 illustrations, including the one of N B Forrest.

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UCV Ribbon-First Tennessee Regiment
Item #: NEW-005089

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Neat ribbon which lists all the battles and engagements that the First Tennessee Regiment participated in. Manney's Brigade and Cheatham's Division. Most of the wear to the ribbon is on the right hand side edge of the ribbon which has a little chunk out of it and a pin hole and small break in the ribbon in the same general area. The area at the top is where the ribbon is folded under.This is a scarce ribbon.

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Confederate Infantry Button
Item #: NEW-005044

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I'm going to let the scans speak for me on the condition of this nice clothing button. It is a two piece constructed button and has a back mark though I can't read it. Under magnification you can see a tiny fragment of material where it came off the uniform. 7/8 of an inch in diameter.

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Rare-Eyewitness to Dark Days of 1861-65-Hampton
Item #: NEW-005041

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You won't find this little soft bound booklet listed in Broadfoot. Rare little volume written by Noah Jasper Hampton who was a private in B Company 18th Tennessee Infantry. Book measures around 7 by 5 inches with 80 pages and photographs. Hampton's outfit was involved in all many of the major Tennessee and Georgia Battles. Hampton was imprisoned at Camp Douglas and Camp Chase and writes some of those experiences. B Company of the 18th Infantry was organized with men from Sumner and Davidson County. Please view the scans for condition. In wraps, covers are very acidic-spine and vertical separation on back cover repaired with acid free, archival tape. Corner broken off on front and back cover.

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1901 Postal Card-Forrest Cartoon-Memphis Reunion
Item #: NEW-005038

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Postally used postal card. View scan for condition. Postal card with a mimeographed cartoon and message reminding Confederate Veterans of a meeting at the Nathan Bedford Forrest Camp of United Confederate Veterans in Chattanooga Tennessee. The cartoon shows a cartoon rendering of Nathan Bedford Forrest on horseback with the caption "Get there first with the most men." This card was a reminder of an upcoming UCV reunion in Memphis. "The advance on Memphis will begin on the 27th. Let the Camp emulate the example of her patron saint." Different cartoons were made by the Adjunct General of the UCV. L T Dickinson, on a monthly basis between the years of 1886-1923. Reference- article I wrote on the series of these postal cards in the Winter issue 1998, The Keynoter, a publication of the American Political Items Collectors.

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1st Edition-Campaigns & Battles of 16th Tennessee
Item #: NEW-004937

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Very tough to obtain Tennessee regimental history by Thomas Head and published in Nashville Tennessee in 1885. Shelf wear to the spine ends but not too badly. Binding intact but somewhat loose especially in the middle section. Some stains on the pages. Overall a nice specimen of this rare book. Here is some information about the Sixteenth Regiment. They were on the whole used for guard duties along the coast near Pocotalico. early in March '62 they were moved to Grahamville S-C. They remained there till after The Battle of Shiloh had been fought. After which they were ordered to Corinth, Mississippi, by Gen. Lee. By the middle of April, the 16th with the 8th were in Atlanta, outside the city "the train run of the track, nine boxes turned over, killed one man by the name of Green, wounded 25 more, killed sever horses is a wonder it did not kill all in the boxes". Such incidents at least broke the monotony of the journey. Resinor Etter found the people of Georgia very understanding, writing "........ went up town and got my diner they would not charge me a cent and said they would never make money from a soldger she said that she had a son out and she would think hardof any person that would not give him omething to eat when hungry the ladies cams down to the depot with bokes (bouquets) an give the boys some nice flowers". Several members of the 16th had found time to visit their homes on the journey, Etter enjoying himself visiting and delivering letters, but others found their folks "generally depressed by the approaching enemy". When they arrived at Corinth on April 26th they were struck by the contrast between Charleston and Corinth, Corinth being just one vast military camp. During the 8th May while at Corinth the Regiment had it's enlistmentt extended and was re-organised. This caused quite a bit of dissatisfaction within the regiment, as some of the men had made arrangements to join the cavalry service, and many had bought their equipment at Mobile. During early May the 16th Tenn took part in the defence of Corinth, forming part of the 1st Brigade, Second Div., 1st Corp of the Army of Mississippi. Beauregard decided to pull out. The Regt. taking part in a skirmish at Bridge Creek before Corinth on May 28th/29th, where a few men were wounded. The withdrawal beginning on the 29th May, bound for Tupelo. The army remained at Tupelo during June & July, Memphis had fallen as had New Orleans. Gen. Bragg decided to advance the army into Kentucky. The army was massed at Chattanooga which began on August 17th 1862, crossing the Cumberland Mountains on Sept 1st. On the morning of the 5th the 16th arrived at Sparta. The next day they moved to Gainsboro. It was Bragg's intention to strike the Louisville & Nashville Railroad north of the Green River, before the Union Army could arrive. To accomplish this the army crossed the Cumberland River near Gainsboro, advanced through Tompkinsville and Glasgow , Ky, to Mumfordsville, which was garrisoned by 4,500 Union soldiers. There followed a brief siege, in whcih the 16th took part. The garrison surrendering after two days The garrison surrendering after two days, without a fight on the 17th September.

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Ultra Rare Murfeesboro Tn Confederate Newspaper
Item #: NEW-004677

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I believe there are only two recorded examples of this rare paper published by the soldiers. Single sheet, printing of the front side only. Titled the Daily Rebel Banner, December 13, 1862. This was obtained from Walter Hoover, a noted collector of Tennessee history. His inked name is at the top. The paper has been silked as was the customary means of preserving a number of years ago. As noted it gives the paper an opaque appearance. On December 13, President Jefferson Davis arrived in Murfreesboro Tennessee to review Bragg's army and to confer with his Generals. This is the top news entry in this paper. There are also numerous runaway slave ads along with news of the war.

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CDV-Rare Post War Pose-General John Bell Hood
Item #: NEW-004369

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Back mark on this post war image of Hood is very faint but but appears to read S Anderson, New Orleans Louisiana. Wear to the edges and some age spotting. Here is some information on General Hood obtained from the web and submitted by Gabe Weaver. General John Bell Hood was born in Owingsville, Kentucky on June 29, 1831. He went to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point where he graduated in 1853. He proved he was a great commander at the Battle of Sharpsburg and the Second Manassas. His arm was severely wounded at the Battle of Gettysburg, and he was severely wounded in the leg at Chickamauga. Later the leg had to be amputated. General Hood earned the temporary rank of full general. Hood was repulsed by Union General W. T. Sherman at the Battle of Peachtree Creek, the Battle of Atlanta, the Battle of Ezra Church, and the Battle of Jonesboro. Hood fell back to Tennessee, where Union General Schofield met Hood at the Battle of Franklin. Hood marched to Nashville, where he was defeated by General Thomas. He requested to be relieved of command of the Army of Tennessee and to return to the rank of Lieutenant General. He surrendered at Natchez, Mississippi. He died in New Orleans, Louisiana of yellow fever on August 30, 1879. He is buried in New Orleans in the Metairie Cemetery.

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POW Letter-Camp Douglas-Third Florida-Co D
Item #: NEW-004250

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One page letter with a line or two on the back, written from Camp Douglas on February 9th, 1865. Camp Douglas, located on the south side of Chicago, became a place of brutal misery to many Confederate prisoners during the Civil War. Rumors of crowded and unhealthy conditions, along with death and disease, were widely circulated in the southern press during the war. The camp soon earned what many people would consider a fitting nickname... “Eighty Acres of Hell”. Taken from website www.prairieghosts.com/campd.html The letter was addressed to Nannie L Keene whose father ran a private school in Kentucky. Nannie had extensive correspondence with many of the soldiers at Camp Douglas, her interest evidently centered at first on the young men who had attended her father's school. Some of the letters were written by one soldier for another who was perhaps not as literate. This may explain my problem with what does not appear to be a V in the beginning letter of this soldier's name, whom I have identified as F M (Frances or Framncis-found spelled both ways) Vause. Here is some of the content of the letter. "Twenty dozen thanks came to hand at last. I was on the eve of despair-thought you had forgotten me-but however that's alright. You have to write to Wille...There is talk of an exchange-in fact they have already parrolled about five hundred, if it should be true...I have been in bad health ever since i've been in prison. F M Vouse Co D 3rh Fla Barracks 47. Letters from soldiers in Florida units are rather scarce.

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Rare Confederate Pass-Murfreesboro Tennessee
Item #: NEW-004247

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This pass measures 2 by 5 inches, "Murfeesboro, Tennessee, November 29th 1862." Note that the 6 was inverted to make the date read 1892. There are other typos, an inverted "the", omission of ll in Marshall. The pass allowed Lt Churchill from the Salem road to Fayetteville. Generaly Braxton Bragg moved his army to Murfreesobro on November 26th 1862 and this hastily printed crude field press pass reflects the likely turmoil of that time. Pass is signed by Lt and Provost Marshall Frank ?. Note: The Salem road ran southest out of Murfreesboro.

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Basil Duke-CDV-POW Pose-Ft. Delaware
Item #: NEW-004245

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Great condition on this CDV of General Basil Duke, brother-in-law of John Hunt Morgan This image was taken by John Gihon while Duke was a prisoner of war at Ft.Delaware. The following information was taken from the following website. www.equilt.com/duke.html Basil Duke was John Hunt Morgan's brother-in-law (he married Morgan's sister Tommy) and second-in-command. He had practiced law in St. Louis, but at the outbreak of hostilities, he was sworn in with Morgan as his first lieutenant. Duke was often the "clear head" that Morgan turned to, and he also served as a valuable chronicler of Morgan's war-time activities. Duke's book, The History of Morgan's Cavalrywas published soon after the war, providing an almost day-by-day account of Morgan's battles, capture and imprisonment, and ultimate death. In an attempt to fend off those who would dishonor Morgan's name and reputation, Duke also served as a major Morgan apologist during the hailstorm of accusations and condemnations which followed soon after Morgan was killed. Always the literary type, Duke composed a poem, Morgan's War-Songwhich sought to explain the passion Morgan and his men felt about their cause of Southern independence. When Morgan liberated the town of Hartsville, Tennessee from Federal occupation in August of 1862, he noted that the Federals had closed down The Plaindealer,Hartsville's sole newspaper. Morgan then suggested that Captain Gordon Niles, one of his officers who had served as an editor befor the war, establish their own newspaper. The subsequent paper, The Videtteproudly featured Morgan's War-Songon the front page of their premiere edition. Duke was promoted to general, and took over as commander of Morgan's ragtag raiders after Morgan was killed, seeing them through to the end of the war. He eventually commanded the soldiers escorting the last gold of the Confederacy and President Jefferson Davis in his attempt to escape in the Spring of 1865 (Davis was captured soon after he left Duke's protective custody). The gold of the Confederacy was split between the remaining soldiers. Duke lived to a ripe old age, later writing another book, Reminiscences of General Basil W. Dukeand serving as chief counsel and lobbyist for the Louisville & Nashville Railroad, an institution he and Morgan had tried desperately to destroy during the war.

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Jeff Thompson CDV-POW-Ft Delaware Pose
Item #: NEW-004244

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This great image of the Confederate guerilla General, Jeff Thompson in full uniform, was taken while he was a prisioner at Ft. Delaware by John Gihon. Great condition. The following was taken from this website. http://www.visitthefort.com/thompson.html Brigadier General Jeff Thompson was one of the most famous Confederates to be imprisoned at Fort Delaware. He was held there for the spring and summer of 1864. A colorful character with a distinct personality, his diaries reflect a stay at the Fort that might almost be desribed as pleasant, due to luxuries granted him because of his Officer status. He was known as a gambler and ladies man, whose military prowess earned him celebrity status. At the outset of the war, Thompson raised and led a battalion of cavalry. He had great success using guerilla tactics; ambushing and seizing ships and soldiers on the Mississippi River, and disappearing into the wilderness. Dubbed the "Missouri Swamp Fox", Thompson was never a full Confederate General, but was treated as one by the army. He commanded as many as 5,000 troops. In August of 1863 he was captured in Pocahontas, Arkansas. He arrived at Fort Delaware in the spring of 1864. Thompson was transfered from Fort Delaware under unique strategic circumstances. During the shelling of Charleston, Confederate General Sam Jones brought 50 Federal officers into the town and advised Union General Foster to cease bombardment or risk killing his own men. The Union countered this bold move by placing Confederate officers in the way of rebel shells.Thompson was one of the first Confederate officers placed on the ships in the direct line of fire. Eventually, 600 Conferderate officers were transported from Fort Delaware to Charleston Harbor, living in deplorable conditions, under fire from their own guns. They are memorialized in the South to this day as "The Imortal 600". Thompson was brought into Charleston under a flag of truce on July 29, 1864, when negotiations for prisoner transfer were finalized. After his release Thompson went to Mississippi and again took up his command. He finally surrendered his brigade on May 9, 1865 after General Lee's surrender.

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CDV-Young Confederate Guerrilla-Ky Backmark
Item #: NEW-004134

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This was found in a scrapbook type notebook of someone's collection. It was titled "One of General Morgan's men". Of course there is nothing to back up this claim but durn if he doesn't have the look of a rebel guerrilla. The CDV does have a Kentucky backmark of J C Elrod who was a Civil War photographer in Louisville. See scan for the condition. His face is a little light. He is sporting a huge holster, possibly a Lemat but I make no claims to that either. He has a sword as well but I can't tell anything about it. Stain or spot above the shoulder as can be seen in the scan.

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Slave Pen-Charles Magnus
Item #: NEW-004072

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This Magnus engraving shows the "Slave Pen" in Alexandria Virginia. Some acidic toning on the right edge.

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Confederate Soldiers Home-Nashville-Hermitage-Photograph
Item #: CIV-003644

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All the old vets are assembled in front of the Confederate Soldiers Home which was on the grounds of the Hermitage. Poor condition and poor clarity on this gelatin silver print but still a rare one, possibly the only one. Faces are still recognizable. See scan to view all the condition problems which include tears, pin holes, missing portions on the photo and the board. I have mended the tears on the back with two different archival tapes, removing scotch tape which had been used. This was offered to me many years ago which I turned down, and passed through at least two collectors hands before finally being purchased by me, at a higher price I might add. Here's hoping that there will be someone else who will want it despite all its flaws. Selling at less than I paid for it. A check would be appreciated.  Note:  The first scan is lighter than the photo and the others scans are truer. The photo would have been taken in the 1880's.

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Broadside-Battle of Nashville
Item #: CIV-003642

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This broadside was purchased in the frame which has been archivally handled. I am selling it for what I paid for it some fifteen years ago and it will be mailed in the frame. It is in rather poor condition but still was saved by the framing. It measures around sixteen by eight inches in the manner of a song sheet and is divided up by the titles, "The Preparation, The Night Scene, The Prelude, The Second Day, the Chief, and The Charge". There is an actual photograph of Major General George H Thomas. There is good clarity in the photo, which has no damage. I could not get a good likeness of this item with the camera. The worst area is shown in the second scan but actually the whole right hand edge has damaged caused by moisture, There is a three inch separation which was not mended and therefore shows more prominently than it would have, had it been mended. This is a very unique, possibly only example extant.

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Rare Arkansas UCV Broadside-Bellefonte
Item #: CIV-003641

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Photo of this broadside was taken at an angle to avoid a flash in the frame, which is not included with the broadside. Undated. Ex-Confederate Reunion at Bellefonte, Aug 27 and 28, "All ex-confederate soldiers are invited to attend this re-union of Ross Ruble Camp. Prominent speakers of the state have been invited. Hon. Jeff McCarn, of Nashville, Tennessee. The program will consist of orations, essays by daughters of the Confederacy and music both vocal and instrumental. Home people are expected to come with baskets well filled for dinner on the ground, those from a distance will be entertatned (sic) by people of the town". W S Allen, Adjudant and W H Harrel Commander. Printed by the Harrison Times. Made on very thin, browned paper. Folds, some stains and perhaps minor tears not visable in the frame. Measures around 12 by 8 and a half inches. This broad side was found in the Jeff McCarn estate papers. McCarn was a prominent Nashville citizen and was the chief prosecutor in one of Nashville's most famous criminal cases in the early 1900's-the slaying of a former US Senator and Editor of the Nashville American newspaper, on the streets of downtown Nashville.

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Yank-Starr Pistol-Corps Badge-Ninth Plate Tintype
Item #: CIV-003536

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Full case, composition material. Good clarity with tinted cheeks. Very good condition. Wearing a corps badge and carrying a starr pistol.

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1862 Memphis Confederate Newspaper
Item #: CIV-003269

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Rare one sheet newspaper, titled The Avalanche and printed in Memphis. Printed on both sides. Three column report of the Battle of Shiloh. Large front page ad advertising an Auction to sell "Four Likely Negroes." by J V Gilbert and company. More war news on the reverse. Thin rag paper with moderate to heavy foxing. Professionally restored and silked, a early paper preservation process. Large mend which runs vertically where the paper probably separated. One hole repaired in the middle and see scan for this. Paper was also trimmed at the bottom with some loss of the text. Date is May 21, 1862.

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1st Edition-Doctor Quintard-Tn Regimental History
Item #: CIV-001303

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Rare Civil War Tennessee Regimental History, Doctor Quintard, Chaplain, C.S.A. Second Bighop of Tennessee. Written by Doctor Quintard. Clean exterior with minor shelf wear. Age spotting on interior board page. Pencil inscription "to Miss Robinson with the respects of the Editor, June 25, 1908" Embossed stamp of the last owner on the fly page. Age spotting on the title page. University Press, Sewanee Tennessee, 1905 publishing date. Red pencil or pen number at top of back board page. Broadfoot lists this book at $600.

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Unpublished John Savage Salt Print
Item #: TEN-001202

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This salt print was removed from the album of Vannerson, a Richmond photographer. To my knowledge it is an unpublished image. Somewhat light around the edges as is normal for salt prints. Still glued to the album page. Identified as the Honorable John Savage of Tennessee, indicating it is pre war and probably taken for official purposes. John Savage is the subject of a very rare Tennessee book called the Life of John Savage. This has recently been reprinted. John Houston Savage was born in McMinnville, Warren County, Tennessee in 1815. Before he was of age he served as a Private under General Edmund P Gaines on the Texas frontier, and also for six months against the Seminoles in Florida. Afterward he studied law, and practised in Smithville, Tennessee. He was made Colonel of Tennessee Militia, and as Attorney-General of the 4th District of Tennessee. In 1845, he was an elector on the Polk ticket. In 1847 he was appointed Major of the 14th infantry, United States army, and served in the Mexican war, being' wounded at Chapultepec, was promoted Lt-Colonel of the 11th Infantry, and, after the death of Colonel William M. Graham, commanded this Regiment until the close of the war. On returning to Tennessee he resumed the practice of law, and was elected to Congress as a Democrat, serving several terms. During the Civil War he was Colonel of the 16th Tennessee Confederate infantry, and was wounded at Perryville and at Murfreesboro. He served in the legislature of Tennessee in 1877, 1879, and 1887.

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Cabinet Card-Gov Isham Harris & Autograph
Item #: TEN-000953

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Photograph of Harris when he was a Senator. Photo by Bell of Washington DC Included is a card that he has autographed.

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General R. B. Snowden & Staff-Memphis Tennessee
Item #: CIV-000621

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Not really Civil War but it has so many important Civil War Veterans that I'm listing it as a Civil War Item. This is actually an Interstate Drill and Encampment, May 10 to 22, 1895, held in Memphis. These type of drills were very popular after the war and was a way, I guess, for the old warriors to relive their past exploits. Marvelous clarity in this photo by Somers. Roughly 9 by 7 and mounted on card board. Reading left to right are J H Martin, E D Noland, K Jones, G M Helm, Robert Gaston, M F Waltz, R B Snoden, M B Mallory, George Gordon, John Overton, and G V Rambaut. Some damage to the board and upper right hand corner has been trimmed.

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Catalog Updated
10/30/2020 11:39:00 AM
Gambler Set-Pistol-Gaming Marker-More

$2,500.00

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