SOLD
Civil War
1861 Union Letter-Lt Col Henry Merwin-Killed at Gettysburg
Item #: NEW-0010805

Click image to enlarge
This is a lengthy, twelve page letter written by Lt Col Henry Merwin at Oak Hill, Fairfax County on July 18th 1861, to his brother.  I have had other letters from this officer that I have sold, some of which can be seen in my sold category.  You will note that the sold letters were from the later stages of the war and that Merwin was killed on July 2, 1863 at the Battle of Gettysburg. This letter is early in the war and written from the field.  His handwriting on the later letters differs and seemed to improve as he became a high ranked officer.  Through my research I have determined that at the time of this letter Merwin held the rank of Sgt with the 2nd Connecticut Infantry during the advance on Manassas, Va., July 16-21 and the occupation of Fairfax C.H. July 17. Merwin's unit participated in r Battle of Bull Run on July 21 1861 which is the period that Merwin wrote this letter..The 2nd Conn regiment mustered out August 7, 1861  The 27th Conn, which Merwin later entered as a Lt Col was organized in New Haven in October of 1862. This famous regiment participated in the Battles of Fredericksburg, Chancehellorsville, and Gettysburg where half of the regiment including Merwin were killed. There is a monument to Merwin at the Gettysburg Battlefield. An image of this is shown in the last scan.

 This letter is still quite legible through written in pencil and the scans do not capture the images very well.   I've only shown one example as I don't think they would be readable on line. The letter relates that his unit was surrounded by over 100 "secessionist" who had captured the Union Captain Abram G Kellogg.  Merlin relates how he lied to a local farmer about being rebels getting him to talk about the area and even about two girls who captured Kellogg and were they were hiding.  Merlin and his men subsequently took all as prisoners.  The complete transcript follows.

Here is transcript of the twelve pages:

Page 1

                                                                          Oak Hill Fairfax Co
                                                                           July 18th 1861

My Dear Brother,

     I hope you will receive this in due time for you may hear before you receive this that I have been taken Prisoner, but I have not and I am in Camp and well.  Since I last wrote I have been surrounded by over one hundred of the Enemy.  I will now give you the circumstances.  Yesterday morning (Friday) our Company, Capt Gores and Capt Chapmans with fifty Calvary under Col of the Army Keese who is now in Command of the Brigade, took us out  

Page 2
Reconointing and of course we were in advance and when we got out about four miles we were sent out as skirmishers about two to three hundred yards in advance of the main body and our line reached out I should say stretched about half to ¾ of a mile so we had quite a sweep.  After we had searched several houses and not found much, we kept on and we must have been within a few miles of Fairfax.  We entered a very thick woods, after we led the way I was in command of the right group and the aide de camp was with us.  I had got quite a way into the woods.  We captured

Page 3

Two secessionists.  They had Sharp Rifles and one had also a six inch Whitney pistol.  They were first seen by my men.  They ordered them to halt, and called or us.  We rushed up and put a guard around them and after we took their arms I sent a man to the main body for a squad to take them.  I delivered them to Capt C.  He then said well then wait here.  The line of skirmishers had got broken.  He went then to the

Page 4

Main body and Col gave the order by the left flank, my group was so far from them we could not hear the order so of course we did not move.  The skirmishers then joined the main body and after they had formed they seen I was missing with Dolph Townsend and three of Capt Gores men.  The A de Camp was with us.  At that Lieut Col Young, who happened to ride out with us but not in command on account of a sore hand.  Sent the bugler of the cavalry in the woods and gave the retreat call, but he could not have been sent in the right direction or the wind was so we could not hear.  After they had waited an hour or two Col Reese said he would take them in and have another party come out but the boys said they would not 

Page 5

go in without us, but Col Keese said they had better fall back a little way and at that Col Young run his horse all the way into Camp and had a short cool head and called up the men, he then took quite a large force and put them on double quick time.  Soon they reached our Company and the others, and they say never was such long faces seen before.  Walter and all our boys said they knew I was not to blame but blame rested on some one.  When the Company met ours & the others were sent into the camp, The Cavalry was sent back with the other force.  They

Page 6

would not let our Boys go for they were afraid they would go too far and not obey orders so they went in with long faces.  Now I will tell you what we saw and did after remaining there for a good while.  I knew all was not right.  I told A de Camp we had better try to find the road.  We started, we had not gone far when we saw a house a little way off we thought we would go towards it and see how things looked.  We worked along through the woods and went with in about one hundred feet of the house.  I was in advance.  I saw from twelve to fifteen men going towards the house.  As soon as I saw them I dropped to the ground and the rest did as I did.  After they had got some we got up and went

Page 7

back and before we had gone a great way we heard chopping in the woods.  We went in about one hundred feet of it and then we heard one say get out of the way and then a tree fell.  There must have been a great many chopping.  Then we heard horses or men in a little brook close by.  We then went close to the brook.  It was about five feet wide.  I lay down back of a very thick brush right on the bank.  The A de Camp was some three or four feet back of me and the other boys right back of him.  We heard men advancing.  We all lay low and there were a company of over thirty men, with their muskets, marched down on the other side in close order with in twelve feet of me and as soon as they had got any distance, we got up and crept towards the edge of the woods.

Page 8

After laying there some time we got through into a corn field and crept for a ways, when one of our boys said that there picket saw us.  Then we got up and went double quick through the field.  Then we reached a rye field and walked through it.  Then when we got through the rye we entered some other woods.  The ones we started for.  Nothing troubled us or occurred but we heard now and then a noise.  By the middle of the after noon, we reached a house.  We went to it and told the man we thought he was on our side.  We told him we were the secession pickets and were out to see if we could see or hear anything of the Black Abolitionists.  He said we were just the ones he wanted to see, that there were some of their pickets not far from his house, so we must be careful.  He then called out his son who is about thirty.  They then brought us out a bit of milk which we used up very quick.  Then the A de Camp went to asking about the Northern troops and once in a while would 
find some thing about the others and in this way we got the names of

Page 9

Quite a number of secessionists and some Union men.  Finally the old man told us that the girls that got Capt Kellogg taken were in the house.  We asked to see them.  We told him we would like to have the pleasure of complimenting them.  They came out on the stoop and we were introduced to them.  They had a place to hide.  It was a place under the stairs.  A piece of floor took up.  After we had got all the information we wanted, the A de Camp told them that we must be going and that he would like to see all the family to bid them good bye.  They all came out on the stoop & then he stepped up and drew his sword

Page 10

and in the name of U S took them prisoners.  We then asked the two Scott girls put on their things and took them and the young man to camp.  Nothing of any interest transpired until we reached our picket.  They told us that they had give us up in camp but that they had a number out looking for us.  So the A de Camp took the first horse he could get and spent chase and before long he returned with the Cavalry.  We were waiting at our outer picket for him to return.  When he did we got a wagon and let the girls ride.  We reached head quarters, which is nearer the picket than camp.  I gave the girls and man up to General T (Tyler).  By this time they had got the news in camp and when we were with

Page 11

in half a mile of Camp, we see the boys coming and as soon as they saw us they broke and rushed down to us, Walter at the head.  They all grabbed us, hugged us and would have carried i into camp if we had been willing. Col Terry & Young treated us handsomely.  At half past eight we went to see General Tyler.  He paid us quite a compliments and was very king to us.  I am now Serg of Guard today.  It was my turn and quite a number offered to take my place and let me rest.  Col said I need not go on unless I wished to, but I got well rested Friday night and am as well as ever.  I got a scratch on my

Page 12

nose.  Is about all the marks I got.  I took one of my pistols with me and I had the misfortune to lose it.  I thank God I did not lose my life.  The pistol I must of lost when I was crawling, when we came up on the first body of men.  I unbuttoned my holster and in that way must of lost it.  My other one is now in my knapsack.  I hope I shall not have the next time to lose it.

Sunday Morning

Giles and Dick is getting our breakfast ready.  We are all well and all send love.  You must excuse looks as I write some what of a hurry.  I give you this  just as it happened.  J E Lewis will probably have a letter in the Paladium soon.  I read yours last night.  Give my love to all.  Write often.  I will write again soon.  Yours Truly Hen (ry)  

Abram G. Kellogg

 






(Sold)
Email to a friend

Sixth Plate Tintype-Double Armed Confederate-Virginia
Item #: NEW-0010766

Click image to enlarge
Handsome rebel image which came out of a Virginia estate, sadly his identity has been lost.  No paypal on this item though payments plans are available.  The soldier is holding a musket and a pistol.  He is wearing a battle shirt and a slouch hat.  The tintype is in perfect condition.  You can see lines in the tintype under a light but these are from the coating not a disruption in the image.   It is housed in the original case and with the original spine.  Untouched until recently. This image was found with his holster and knife which can be found under the category of Soldier Items.                            

(Sold)
Email to a friend

CDV-Full Standing Pose-Robert E Lee-Lee Gallery-Richmond Va
Item #: NEW-0010697

Click image to enlarge
Great condition on this highly sought period photograph of General Lee.  Corners clipped but very clean. No paypal on this item though payment plans are welcomed. Lee Gallery backmark

(Sold)
Email to a friend

End of the War Release of POW-Point Lookout Maryland
Item #: NEW-0010696

Click image to enlarge
Two documents from Point Lookout which are glued together on one side. One document releases Constant Flinn, 21st North Carolina Infantry, Company K, signed on June 126th 1865.  The back of the document  shows the Oath and terms of the Parole.  The second document is where Flinn signed the oath.  Other than the folds and some mild foxing and stains the document is is outstanding shape, especially considering that the soldier had to carry it on his body on the long trek home.

(Sold)
Email to a friend

1897-Gorgeous Graphic Letter-Ass of Confederate Soldiers-Tn Division
Item #: NEW-0010664

Click image to enlarge
This letter is certifying that Evander McIver enlisted in the Confederate Army...joining Rutledge's Battery of Artillery and that he was honorably discharged.  Also certifying that he was a member of Frank Cheatham Bivorac No I in Nashville. The letter is all in the hand of John P Hickman, Secretary and signed by Charles Anderson.  Beautiful graphics also include an embossed official seal with ribbons.  Tear at bottom edge and acidic marks where the ribbons were folded into the letter for many years. The letter was encapsulated to protect it and can be easily removed. 

(Sold)
Email to a friend

1888-LH-Surviving Veterans-3rd Ga Regiment-Home Guards
Item #: NEW-0010656

Click image to enlarge
This interesting letterhead shows the Battle Flag of the Third Georgia Regiment and was sent from the Survivors Association 3rd Ga Veterans in Augusta Ga announcing that the vets would have a reunion on the 8th and 9th of August at Madison Georgia.  Claiborne Snead President, A A Winn, Secretary Savanah Ga an W A Wiley, Ass't Sect'y of Madison Ga.  Made on very thin paper which has grown very acidic over the years.  The folds have turned into separations and chipped corners and other areas.  There is one strip of scotch tape on the back and I have reparied all the other separations with archival acid free tape which because of its thinness can't be seen in the scan.                    

(Sold)
Email to a friend

Celluloid-John Hunt Morgan-Unveiling of his Monument
Item #: NEW-0010650

Click image to enlarge
This a rare button featuring John Hunt Morgan on the occasion of the unveiling of his Monument in Lexington Ky 1911.  One and a quarter inch celluloid with condition problems.  Some scattered light foxing not very noticible.  There is however a large celluloid split on the bottom rim.  I bought this about twenty years ago and it has not gotten any worse so I think it is stable.   

(Sold)
Email to a friend

South Carolina Ribbon with Woven Palmetto Tree
Item #: NEW-0010645

Click image to enlarge
Unique souvenir probably worn at a UCV reunion.  Six and a half inch cotton ribbon with a woven Palmetto Tree, a symbol of secession.  There are crossed wooden hand painted flags representing the Confederate Battle Flag and the South Carolina Flag.  The red is somewhat faded.  There is an antique pin which indicates that was probably worn by a woman attendee.   

(Sold)
Email to a friend

Scarce Confederate Veteran Reunion Ribbon-Memphis 1891
Item #: NEW-0010635

Click image to enlarge
This is a scarce item as it was made for a state reunion as opposed to a national UCV reunion.  Silk ribbon that wants to turn down at the top.  Small stain on the right hand edge across from the flag.  The ribbon measures five and a half inches long.   

(Sold)
Email to a friend

Southern Cross of Honor-Identified Tennessee Soldier-Rock City Guards
Item #: NEW-0010634

Click image to enlarge
This Cross of Honor belonged to Theodore Cooley, an important  Nashvillian.  A magnificent albumen of him is also on my site.  The hanger on the bar is a jewelers swivel clasp.  I have seen other badges of Cooley, who demanded the best quality in everything he owned. 

Theodore Cooley was from Nashville,Tn. & enlisted at the age of 18.Captured near Decatur Alabama in December 1864 & sent to Fort Delaware for the remainder of the war. He was a member of Frank Cheatham Bivouac UCV camp in Nashville. A photograph of Cooley along with other veterans of Maney's First Tennessee Infrantry Regiment (Rock City Guards) is also in William Grissom's book When the South was Southern.

(Sold)
Email to a friend

1896 UCV Ribbon with Secession Palmetto Tree-Richmond
Item #: NEW-0010626

Click image to enlarge
Beautiful and unusual delegate ribbon from the Sixth Annual Reunion held in Richmond Virginia.  The homemade Palmetto tree is sewn  into the ribbon. Crisp appearance but there is a middle fold with a edge separation.  There is also a light stain that begins at the top and runs down to the mentioned fold just under the flag. The ribbon measures slightly under eight inches.  

(Sold)
Email to a friend

Albumen-Richmond -Virginia-UCV Veterans-Group Pose
Item #: NEW-0010617

Click image to enlarge
Mounted albumen which measures 12 by 14 inches.  The photo itself measures 9 by 7 inches.  The board is stained but could be trimmed since there is no photographer' mark.  Condition of the photograph is excellent.  The clarity is quite good for a group pose and the only thing that is really blurred is the large UCV Richmond Camp banner hanging from the roof of the home. The old vets are wearing ribbons and badges many  identifiable.  There is a small banner near one of the poles which shows a clear portrait of Robert E Lee and behind that is a shield which reads Sponsor and part of the word Div which I'm sure stands for Division.  The smaller shields read UCV Richmond Va.  The woman with the roses and carrying a flag is probably one of the Maids or Sponsors of the reunion. I'm sure many of the old vets could be identified by someone familiar with Virginia Confederate veterans. Hate to part with this one.

(Sold)
Email to a friend

Rare Confederate Monument Unveiling-Union Springs Alabama
Item #: NEW-0010439

Click image to enlarge
Unused, undivided back postcard in great condition.  It has the appearance of a real photo card but it isn't.  I believe the murky appearance indicates that it is a copy of a real photo.  Nevertheless it is a period postcard showing a crowd no doubt for the unveiling of this monument. My research indicates that the monument was unveiled in March 29, 1895 by the Ladies Memorial Association so this image was probably taken from a photograph made at that time.

(Sold)
Email to a friend

1913 Ribbon-Badge-Gettysburg Reunion-Robert E Lee Drop
Item #: NEW-0010193

Click image to enlarge
Desirable item made for the Confederate veterans attending the Gettysburg reunion.  The red color denotes an artillery man.  Ribbon is worn as can be seen in the scan.  Dingy, one small separation line.  Original pin is missing and an ancient pin holds the ribbon to the celluloid drop which is clean. 

This item sold some time ago

(Sold)
Email to a friend

Rare Greensboro North Carolina Parole-42nd Ga Volunteers
Item #: NEW-0010192

Click image to enlarge
Please view the scans to see the condition on this parole given at the end of hostilities between Confederate General Joseph E Johnson and Union General William Sherman.  Parole was issued to W L Strickland, Co D 42nd Georgia Volunteers.  These passes are always worn as the soldier was required to keep it in his pocket on the long walk home.  It is surprising that any survived.

The 42 was a very active unit.  Here is a brief history:    

42nd Regiment, Georgia Infantry was assembled at Camp McDonald, Georgia, in March, 1862, with men from Gwinnett, De Kalb, Newton, Walton, Fulton, and Calhoun counties. The regiment moved to Tennessee, then Mississippi where it was attached to General Barton's Brigade in the Department of Mississippi and East Louisiana. It fought at Chickasaw Bayou and Champion's Hill, and on July 4, 1863, was captured at Vicksburg. Exchanged and brigaded under General Stovall, the 42nd continued the fight in various battles from Missionary Ridge to Bentonville. In December, 1863, it contained 444 men and 394 arms, and in November, 1864, there were 345 present for duty. The regiment surrendered with the Army of Tennessee with 5 officers and 126 men. 

(Sold)
Email to a friend

1915-Celluloid with Ribbon-Richmond Reunion-Trenton Tn
Item #: NEW-0010158

Click image to enlarge
Gray coat celluloid from the Richmond reunion in 1915.  "The old Grey Jacket." Official UCV reunion badge.  What makes this rare is the ribbon from delegates from the Trenton Tennessee R M Russell Camp No 908.  I've never seen another one. Great specimen as can be seen in the scan.

(Sold)
Email to a friend

Rare 1903 Mosby's Men Ribbon-UCV Reunion-Culpeper Virginia
Item #: NEW-0010093

Click image to enlarge
Small ribbon which measures around four and a half inches.  Ribbon is complete though part of it is turned over.  I believe that this ribbon was conferred on Confederate Veterans attending the 10th annual UCV state reunion or possibly representatives of the Confederate Veteran magazine.  Date is August 6, 1903.  I have never seen this ribbon offered before and Mosby related buttons are rarely offered.

(Sold)
Email to a friend

Rare Confederate CDV-Jefferson Davis-The Right Man in the Right Place
Item #: NEW-009945

Click image to enlarge
This period CDV has a Quinby & Co  Charleston South Carolina backmark.  It is a photograph  of a Confederate Seal.  "Our First President."  This was produced early in the war. See scan to view the condition.

(Sold)
Email to a friend

Ribbon-A.P. Hill No 6 CV Camp-Petersburg Va
Item #: NEW-009779

Click image to enlarge
Early ribbon that precedes the United Confederate Veterans organization.  The A P Hill Camp, Number 6 was organized in 1887.  No condition problems.  See scans.  

(Sold)
Email to a friend

North Carolina UCV Reunion-Winston Salem
Item #: NEW-009773

Click image to enlarge
Beautiful celluloid disc hanging from a celluloid bar.  This North Carolina reunion was held in 1912.  No cracks or splits.  Some spotting which is clearly on the surface.  This is a rare one.

 United Confederate Veterans. 
North Carolina UCV Reunion 
Winston Salem North Carolina

(Sold)
Email to a friend

1896 Print-Richmond Dispatch-Confederate Souvenir Edition
Item #: NEW-009753

Click image to enlarge
Great colors on this old color litho print.  Thin paper which shows folds with wear to them, a chunk out of the upper right hand area and small chips on the edge where the folds are. Some tears at the edges which I may have repaired with acid free archival tape on the back. Small hole at the mid fold and tear just under the words Design for. Other minor wear. Has been encapsulated and can be sent in a roll. Shows Jefferson Davis, Alexander Stephens and the Confederate cabinet along with Robert E Lee and Stonewall Jackson.  Writing at the bottom which says Litho by A Hoen & Co Richmond Virginia and the date Copyright 1896 to the right. I have seen other examples of this print at shows and this is by far better than any I've seen.  Measures 23 by 17 inches. 

(Sold)
Email to a friend

Real Photo PC-Monument in Murfressboro with Vet
Item #: NEW-009441

Click image to enlarge
Unused card which shows the "Monument in Natl Military Cemetery Murfreesboro Tennessee-Capt Hunt of Forrest's Cavalry". There was a Captain Hunt in Forrest's Cavalry so presumably this is him. Nice condition.

(Sold)
Email to a friend

1907 Identified UCV Reunion Lot-Richmond Virginia
Item #: NEW-009331

Click image to enlarge
Pristine Badge with paper tag from the United Confederate Veteran Reunion that was held in Richmond. Souvenir Badge on the original paper from that same reunion. Both are identified on the back as belonging to William B Gallaher enlisted in May of 1861 in the 1st Virginia Cavalry. He served for only a few months before he resigned for ill health in August of 1861. Paypal will not be accepted on this item though payment plan will be accepted with a $50 non-refundable down payment.

(Sold)
Email to a friend

Confederate Sheet Music-The Alabama
Item #: NEW-009131

Click image to enlarge
This scarce sheet is complete but a little too large to fit in the scanner. Very good condition with only one small stain and light foxing. Printed in 1864 in Richmond Va. Lithographed and Published by George Dunn & Company. Semmes

(Sold)
Email to a friend

1861 Letter-Stonewall Brigade Officer to Wife
Item #: NEW-009128

Click image to enlarge
Lengthy and legible five page letter written by Captain Samuel J C Moore of the Second Virginia Brigade. Moore was from Clarke County Virginia and this letter was written to his wife. Camp Stephens, June 27, 1861 My Dearest Ellen, I have more leisure than usual today, and have concluded to improve it by writing you a good long letter, unless I should meet with some interruption before I get through, which may compel me to curtail the letter of some of its fair proportions. This is my day, in regular succession, to act as "officer of the day”, which prevents me from going out in drill and keeps me in and about the camp to overlook and direct the guard. The office is a very laborious one when its duties extend to an army of any considerable size, but when as in our case, a single regiments encamped to itself, the officer of the day for that regiment has a very easy time of it. Our army at this point, that is in this immediate neighborhood consists of 4 Virginia Regiments, encamped within gun shot of one another, some four miles on the road between Martinsburg and the Potomac, that is 4 miles from Martinsburg; and a Regiment of Cavalry some 1 and one half miles further on in the direction of the river--besides this there are other troops so situated as that they could readily reinforce us in case of an attack. We are placed in such a situation as constantly to extend an irritation to our friends over the river to pay us a visit-our policy as yet does not seem to be aggressive, but so far as I can judge, it is to encourage the enemy to come over, and then to give him the best reception in our power. Appearances indicate an intention to come over, as the Federal army has been reinforced within the last day or two, by the arrival of a considerable number of troops and they are constantly firing cannon and musket, balls and shell at our picket guards, and most other persons who venture in sight of them. The other day, being somewhat weary of camp life and anxious to see whether the Yankees look like white men or not, I borrowed a horse from one of the Clarke Cavalry and rode down to the neighborhood of Williamsport. I had a good view of their camp from a hill on this side, and of some 2 or 3 companies of their troops marching about on various duties-ventured near enough to see them with the naked eye but of course saw them more distinctly with a spy glass I borrowed from a brother officer. In walking about at various points, with which I was perfectly familiar, as they were on our old camping ground on this side of the river, I picked up a minie ball which I supposed had been fired by the enemy at some of our men on this side, and going a little nearer the river I came upon the ground where the day before some 30 of the Yankees had been fired upon and run off by a party of 12 of our men-our party seeing their approach concealed themselves in a small house (the toll house on the Turnpike) and when they came near enough, fired at them from the windows, killing one of them-they took refuge behind a hill and in a short time plucked up courage enough to attempt another advance, which was checked by another volley. This was repeated 3 or 4 times, when the enemy concluded that "discretion was the better part of valor”, and retired over the river, bearing with them, it is said, 2 killed-2 wounded. "Nobody hurt” on our side. The camp did not honor me with a shot, but they amuse themselves every day, I understand, firing at hands working in the fields on the Virginia side--a thing unheard of in what is called "civilized warfare.” On the ground where they stood when they were first fired at by our pickets, I found a good pocket knife, which I intend to keep until I find the owner-it has marked on the handle the initials "A K. L” which some of our men have interpreted "awfully killed and licked.” Should they again attack us, I hope the interpretation may prove as true as Daniels’ explanation of the King’s vision. I am surprised to hear that statement you make about ?’s views. I had really come to think that his views were very sound and very strong on our side--his idea that spies should be treated with kindness and consideration is absurd-they ought to be hanged as high as ?, every man of them-the laws of war require this and justice and our own safely demand it; and as to the miserable traitors in our own State, such as are so abundant in Western Va, and to be found here, who are using their influence and their means to embarrass the State in her present warfare, why no fate is too severe for them; and it is time that we were inflicting summary justice upon them. I am not blood thirsty, yet I feel that the safety and very existence of our state require the utmost vigor in punishing and putting down such crimes against her. A lot of husband talk, beautifully written, closing with …” As soon as this important event is over I shall fly to you again…but you know I have come and am here from a sense of duty, and I know full well that you would not have me to otherwise than remain in the service of the state, at this time when she requires the services of every true man in her borders. Our company comes on very well-it is now 100 strong, and is composed of the best materials for soldiers, in the regiment-strong, able bodies men-ready at all times to obey orders and seemingly at all times anxious for service. The men are pretty ragged and dirty, and the arrival of the clothes will be an era in the company’s existence. There are several of them that have yet no haversacks, and a good many still who have no calico shirts-are any more of the two articles to come on yet? We are truly and profoundly grateful to the ladies of Clarke for their kindness to us and their diligence in providing for our wants and contributing to our comfort-these acts will never be forgotten so long as one of the "Clarke Riflemen” survives…” My confidence in the protection of the valley grows stronger every day-the very name given to our army is significant-the General in command has styled it the "Army of the Shenandoah”-a pretty name is it not… Tell your Father that there was much disappointment in the army that we had not a chance at the enemy on the day he started to join us at Bunker Hill. I do not think General Johnson will have another such chance to win a name as he had that day-yet I understand & appreciate the reasons which induced him seemingly to decline the contest. Rest is personal. Signed Samuel J C Moore According to Moore’s obituary in the Confederate Veteran, Moore first joined a military company in Berryville, later as first lieutenant took part in the occupation of Harper’s Ferry directly after the passage of the secession ordinance of the Virginia Convention. After the capture of Harper’s Ferry his company was assigned as Company I to the brigade of General T J (Stonewall) Jackson and was in the first battle of Manassas. Having been promoted Captain, he led his company through the campaign of 1862 in the Shenandoah Valley, receiving wounds at Kerns town, and taking part in the battles of McDowell, Winchester, and Port Republic, and then at the engagements of Cedar Mountain and Second Manassas. In the latter battle (at Groveton) he was seriously wounded, and upon recovery was appointed assistant adjutant general of Jackson’s old division. In this capacity he participated in the battles of Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, and Mine Run, and entered the Wilderness campaign of 1864, being again severely wounded in the first day of battle. Upon recovery he was assigned to the staff of Gen Jubal Early and served with him in the battle of Winchester, where he was promoted to be adjutant general and chief of staff. While on General Early’s staff he took part in the battles of Fisher’s Hill, Cedar Creek, and Waynesboro. He was the first Commander of the J E B Stuart Camp of Confederate Veterans of Berryville. He was Mayor of Berryville and Judge of the County Court. He died in 1908. Here is a history of the Second Virginia Regiment. 2nd Infantry Regiment was assembled at Charles Town in April, 1861, then moved to Harper's Ferry to seize the armory. The unit was accepted into Confederate service in July. Its companies were from the counties of Clarke, Frederick, Floyd, Jefferson, and Berkeley. It became part of the Stonewall Brigade and served under Generals T.J. Jackson, R.B. Garnett, Winder, Paxton, J.A. Walker, and W. Terry. The 2nd fought at First Manassas, First Kernstown, and in Jackson's Valley Campaign. It went on to fight with the Army of Northern Virginia from the Seven Days' Battles to Cold Harbor except during the Maryland Campaign when it was detached to Martinsburg as provost guards. Later the unit was involved in Early's operations in the Shenandoah Valley and the Appomattox operations. It reported 90 casualties at First Kernstown, 25 at Cross Keys and Port Republic, 27 at Gaines' Mill, and 77 at Second Manassas. The regiment lost 2 killed and 19 wounded at Fredericksburg, had 8 killed and 58 wounded at Chancellorsville, and had about eight percent of the 333 engaged at Gettysburg disabled. On April 9, 1865, it surrendered with 9 officers and 62 men. Its field officers were Colonels James W. Allen, Lawson Botts, and John Q.A. Nadenbousch; Lieutenant Colonels Raleigh T. Colston, Francis Lackland, and William W. Randolph; and Majors Francis B. Jones, Edwin L. Moore, and Charles H. Stewart.

(Sold)
Email to a friend

Scarce Roster of Crenshaw Battery-1884
Item #: NEW-009116

Click image to enlarge
This is a scarce publication titled "Roster of Crenshaw Battery Pegram's Artillery Battalion, 3rd Corps, Army of Northern Virginia of Richmond Virginia". Published in Richmond in 1884. This specimen has condition problems as can be seen in the scan. It was no doubt mailed in the envelope seen in the scan to a soldier of the Crenshaw battery, James F Newman. There is a rather large separation at the middle fold and some staining. Please view the scan carefully.

(Sold)
Email to a friend

Three Buttons from Confederate Officers Uniform-With Provenance
Item #: NEW-008986

Click image to enlarge
This lot is being relisted as I have forgoed my commission and lowered the price. They are also not in my possession now as I have returned to the family for safe keeping.   These buttons are accompanied by impeccable provenance from the family. Paypal will not be accepted on this listing but payment plans will be accepted. The authenticity of these buttons has been confirmed by a well known Civil War dealer. This lot consists of three Confederate staff buttons. One is CS7 A (14 stars W. Dowler/Superior Quality) and there are two CS36 A1 (H T & B Manchester) Reference Albert. All three buttons are in excellent condition with much of the gilt still present. They are tied to an index card with writing on both sides made by a family member. Here is a transcript of the writing. ""Buttons from Officers Uniform of Lt William Summerfield Sawrie C.SA. Acting Adjutant General, 2nd Arkansas Regiment staff of General Wm Govan of Arkansas. Enlisted in 1st Tenn Reg April 1861 as private After a years service he became sick and was discharged. He visited some Hewlett cousins in Ark to recuperate and about the time of his partial recovery the 2nd Reg was recruiting. Two of his cousins enlisted and so did he He served with the 2nd Ark Reg til the bitter end being discharged at Greensbourough N. S. Riding in a wagon en route back to Nashville his sabre was lost thru a crack in the wagon bed. After reaching home he never again donned his uniform, which is now on display at the Old Carter House Franklin Tennessee." I asked the consignor to check and see if the uniform was still on display and it was though an official stated that displays are periodically changed. The Carter House is a famous Civil War landmark in Franklin where wounded and dying soldiers were treated or buried after the Battle of Franklin. It is a remarkable experience to view the floors still soaked in blood of those who fought and died for their cause.

(Sold)
Email to a friend

UCV Commander Harry Rene Lee Paper Lot
Item #: NEW-008939

Click image to enlarge
Beautiful graphic lettersheet from the Tennessee Division of the United Confederate Veterans, Nashville Tennessee. The letter is written and signed by Harry Rene Lee who eventually became the Commander of the UCV. Included also is a small calling card bearing the name of Brig Gen Harry Rene Lee, Second Brigade Tennessee Division, UCV. There is also a very worn UCV cover which will be included in the lot.

(Sold)
Email to a friend

UCV Celluloid Worn by Gen N B Forrest's Soldiers
Item #: NEW-008910

Click image to enlarge
This beautiful United Confederate Reunion item was made for the soldiers who fought under Lieut. General Nathan Bedford Forrest. There is a plain bar that is missing at the top of this specimen along with a ribbon. . The item measures slightly over two inches.It is lighter than it appears in the image.  Some foxing along the underside rim and a couple of dots here and there, not that noticable. The most prominent dot to the left of Forrest's face is actually in the printing as it is on the other button I have in the same place. The reverse of the celluloid has a pinkish tint on the right side. There are also some puncture marks visible more under magnification. These do not go through the celluloid. 

price reduced

This item is now available due to a failed plan.

(Sold)
Email to a friend

Rare UCV Button-Ashby's Tennessee Cavalry Brigade
Item #: NEW-008838

Click image to enlarge
One inch celluloid with paper insert. Henry Ashby.

(Sold)
Email to a friend

Battles of Franklin Nashville Letters-Battle Content
Item #: NEW-008803

Click image to enlarge
No paypal on this item though payment plan is fine. Three great letters written by Captain Brad F Thompson of the 112th Illinois Infantry. The first letter is written in pen and is quite legible and clean. The other two short letters were written in haste, in pencil following the battles. Of interest also is that Brad Thompson wrote a rare regimental history of the 112th printed in 1885.   
     The following is a partial transcript of the longest letter, three pages though only the first page is shown in the scan. Headquarters 112th Reg Ill Vol Inf Fort Negley-Nashville Tn Dec 7 1864 My Dear Wife, Personal content "I hope you had a good time going to town on the 30th, and succeeded in purchasing all you required. I wish I had been with you. That was the day we had such a terrible fight at Franklin; where men fell by thousands, and where shot and shell and grape and canister rattled thick and fast, where the whistling of bullets, the roar of cannon and the yells of the mad soldiers were enough to confuse any man’s senses, and confound his mind. Oh! What a terrible day, an awful day, and one that no man who was there can ever forget. Nearly five thousand men killed in one day; upon one field, every one of whom left a wife, a mother, a sister, or perhaps children to mourn his death. War is terrible: this war is more terrible than any other, and the end is not yet (in sight). Hood’s army continues to encircle the city, but whether he will risk an attack or will move off towards Kentucky is not yet apparent. If he goes to Kentucky, as some think he will, we will follow him. In that case we will have a long and arduous campaign before us-in the midst of a cold, wet winter. I hope Hood will attack us here, for I believe we can annihilate his army if he does"…rest is personal comments and some camp news. Yours truly, Brad F Thompson Second Letter 6 miles south of Nashville Dec 17 (1864) 8 o’clock A M My dear wife, We have been fight Hood two days, and have whipped him handsomely. We are moving on. All is well up to date. Love and kisses, Brad Third Letter Near Brentwood Tenn Dec 18th 1864 My Dear Wife: Our army attacked the Rebel army before Nashville on the 15th inst. We drove them considerably. On the 16th the Rebels were flanked, whipped, and completely routed. The Rebels are retreating as fast as possible, and we are following. Not a man hurt in the 112th. All well. Rainy and muddy. Hurrah! For Thomas. Hood is gone up. Will write soon. Love and kisses. In haste, Brad Thompson was born in Osceola Illinois, enlisting as a 1st sergeant in Co B, 112th Illinois Volunteer Infantry on Aug 12, 1862. He was promoted to 2nd Lieut March 31, 1863, served as adjutant from Nov 25, 1863, and promoted to captain April 25 1865, prior to his muster out June 20th 1865.

Battle of Franklin
Battle of Nashville
112 Illinois Infantry
Captain Brad F Thompson

price adjustment

(Sold)
Email to a friend

Historical Lot-Stonewall Brigade Band
Item #: NEW-008505

Click image to enlarge
This lot consists of four items. 1.Graphic lettersheet of the Stonewall Brigade Band in Staunton Virginia dated August 14th, 1902. Addressed to "Stonewall Brigade Band". from John E. Stoddard, who is regretfully tendering his resignation as secretary of the band. Here are the people listed on the graphic lettersheet: C E Haines, President, R A Hamilton 1st Vice-President, J M Brereton, Bandmaster, D C Barkman, 2nd Vice Pres, R R Heydenreich, Treas. Note the scan of the backside of this lettersheet which gives a brief sketch of this historic band. The second and third item in the lot is a graphic letter and cover. Letter is addressed to Professor J M Brereton, President of the Stonewall Brigade band. I believe the letter is signed by T C Morton, acting adjuntant. Letterhead reads "Headquarters Grand Camp Confederate Veterans, Department of Virginia, dated Sept 14, 1902. "I am instructed by the Stonewall Jackson Camp C W to invite the band to attend the veterans lawn party on Sears Hill Sept 11th PM and cooperate with us in making it a pleasant occasion for all and profitable to the Camp. The funds we hope to secure, will be used in caring for sick, infirm, & needy Confederate Veterans during the approaching winter....Note on the cover the recipient has written, "approved." The last item is a booklet titled "Constitution and By Laws of the Stonewall Brigade Band, as revised and adopted at a meeting held in their ball. Dated January 15, 1900. The small booklet measures 6 by 3 and one half inches. 15 pages. In pencil on the back is listed the trips the band took in 1900 (5). Here is a brief history of th Band: This band had it origin in Staunton Virginia in 1855. They became the Stonewall Brigade Band in name following the Civil War. This band is the longest, continuous band in America's history. They played (and do play) for all kinds of events and were regular contributors to the United Confederate Veteran events. Several of the original members served in the Confederacy.

Stonewall Jackson

(Sold)
Email to a friend

Rare CDV-Robert Caruthers-Confederate Governor-Tn
Item #: NEW-008492

Click image to enlarge
This is possibly an unpublished image of Robert Looney Caruthers who won the governorship of Tennessee but was never inaugurated. Once Tennessee seceded from the union, President Lincoln appointed Andrew Johnson as Military Governor. I don't know whether or not this is Caruthers's autograph. C C Giers of Nashville Tennessee was the photographer. See scan to view the condition. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Robert Looney Caruthers (July 31, 1800 – October 2, 1882) was a distinguished attorney and politician who was elected governor of the state of Tennessee. He is buried in Cedar Grove Cemetery in Lebanon, Tennessee Caruthers had a distinguished career as an attorney and educator. He served as the Tennessee state attorney general (1827-1832), and after as a member of the Tennessee state legislature and the United States Congress. He and his brother, Abraham Caruthers, founded Cumberland School of Law, in Lebanon, Tennessee, which is one of the oldest law schools in the United States, by formalizing an arrangement between it and Cumberland University. During the 1960s Cumberland University sold Cumberland Law School to Samford University in Birmingham, Alabama. Caruthers was elected during the American Civil War when the Confederate states controlled Tennessee in 1863. However, by the time that he was to have been inaugurated, the Confederate Government controlled a relatively small portion of Tennessee, so he never actually served or was inaugurated as governor. Therefore, Caruthers is not counted in official lists of those who served as governor of Tennessee. But the fact that he was elected is one reason for discrepancies in reference works, which state the number of peoplewho have served as governor of Tennessee

(Sold)
Email to a friend

Letter-One Confederate Soldier to Another-Gruesome Details
Item #: NEW-008466

Click image to enlarge
This is a two page, legal sized letter written to Edward D Hicks, former Confederate officer and nephew and Adjunct to General Felix Zollicoffer and from Jones Hicks, late of the 50th Tennessee Infantry Regiment. Original cover, postmarked from Clarksville on April 15th. Please note the condition problems in the scans but it is very legible and the content more than makes up for the condition. Here is the content: (Histories of Units follow) April 8, 1865 Mr. E D Hicks, Dear Cousin, Feeling it my duty as your friend and relative I endeavor to write you a few lines to inform you that I am well at present hoping if my letter should reach you it may find you well and enjoying yourself finely but as there is so much hard fighting going on now I don’t suppose any person of feeling could enjoy themselves much in fact I don’t myself indeed I have seen a great deal of trouble since this cruel war began. I suppose cousin you have head before now about the death of my two brothers Billy and Jimmie. Thy both went out in Co B 14th Regiment Tennessee Volunteers and was stationed at Clarksville Tennessee for two or three months and from there they were ordered to Virginia. They went through The campaign (Cheat Mountain) without getting wounded until the Battle of Cedar Run and during the battle Brother William was wounded in the right arm and was not able for duty for four or five months and he got a furlough and came home and while he was at home captured by the Federal Cavalry stationed at Fort Donelson and was sent to Johnson’s Island and kept for two or three months and he was exchanged just before the battle Gettysburg Penn and his thigh was broken and he was taken prisoner again and sent to Chester Penn. He was wounded on the 3 day of July his leg was amputated on the 25 of July and he died from mortification on the 10th of August in prison. Brother James was wounded in the mouth in the Battle Fredericks burg Va. He was wounded in the mouth and his jaw bone was broken in two places and all of his front teeth was knocked out and all of his jaw teeth was knocked out in one side and he was taken prisoner and sent to Washington City and confined there one or two months and was exchanged and returned to military duty and he was wounded in the first Battle of Petersburg Va and his thigh was broken and he was sent the hospital at Lynchburg Va and he got very near well of his wounds and he thought that he would be able to return to his command again and he died all of a sudden of diseases they are both dead now, may God bless and protect them. I suppose you have heard of Pa’s death before now. He died the 2nd day of May 1863. He died of typhoid and pneumonia. Ma is well and in very good health.. My health is tolerable good and has been ever since I returned from the army. I got home from the army in March 1863 and have been home ever since February of last year. I raised a right fine crop of tobacco and corn. I am going to school now. I would like very much to get into business in Nashville… More along this line. Jones Hicks Jr. (50th Tennessee Infantry) 14th Regiment, Tennessee Infantry 14th Infantry Regiment was formed at Camp Duncan, near Clarksville, Tennessee, in May, 1861, with eleven companies. However, Company F disbanded in May, 1863, and 32 men transferred to Company E. Its members were recruited in the counties of Montgomery, Robertson, and Stewart. Ordered to Virginia, the regiment participated in Lee's Cheat Mountain Campaign and for a time served under T.J. Jackson. Later it was attached to General S. R. Anderson's, Hatton's, Archer's, and McComb's Brigade. The 14th was prominent in many conflicts of the Army of Northern Virginia from Seven Pines to Cold Harbor, then was active in the long Petersburg siege south of the James River and the Appomattox Campaign. It sustained 84 casualties during the Seven Day's Battles, 33 at Cedar Mountain, 48 at Second Manassas, 59 at Fredericks burg, and 35 at Chancellorsville. Of the 220 engaged at Gettysburg, over fifty percent were disabled. The unit surrendered 6 officers and 34 men. Its field officers were Colonels William A. Forbes and William McComb; Lieutenant Colonels Nathan Brandon, Milton G. Gholson, G.A. Harrell, and James W. Lockert; and Majors James H. Johnson and Nathan M. Morris. Here is a history of the 50th Tennessee Infantry: Organized December 25, 1861 at Fort Donelson from 10 companies which had previously been mustered in there and a various other places. captured Fort Donelson: reorganized September 23 and consolidated with the 1st Tennessee Battalion. Paroled Greensboro N C as part of 2nd Consolidated Tennessee Infantry Regiment.

(Sold)
Email to a friend

Double Armed Union Cavalryman-Sixth Plate
Item #: NEW-008411

Click image to enlarge
Handsome, fully decked out Union soldier. Excellent condition and clarity. Nice condition on the thermoplastic case which is original to the image. Purchased from an Ohio dealer many, many years ago. The trooper is uniformed in a shell jacket with shoulder scales, is wearing a 1858 pattern hat looped on the right side which is regulation for mounted troops. Sword and Merrill carbine. This image was printed in an issue of Military images. Vol XXX, number 2.

(Sold)
Email to a friend

Confederate Soldier-LaGrange Light Guards
Item #: NEW-008388

Click image to enlarge
This CDV has been trimmed at the bottom leaving a rough edge to the photograph. No back mark but found in a collection of LaGrange Georgia photographs. The uniform matches the uniform of the La Grange Light Guards. There is a spotty appearance to the photo which can be seen in the scan.

(Sold)
Email to a friend

Sterling Price Celluloid Button-Missouri UCV
Item #: SOL-008357

Click image to enlarge
Beautiful three inch button in excellent condition which as made for the Fifth Annual Reunion.

(Sold)
Email to a friend

Rare-Nashville Newspaper Extra-Lincoln Assassination
Item #: NEW-008280

Click image to enlarge
This item is from my personal collection and is the only specimen I have ever seen although I did see it pictured in a book. It is a single sheet extra newspaper published by the Nashville Union newspaper on Saturday morning, April 15th 1865 announcing the shooting of Abraham Lincoln. "The Rebel Fiends at Work". All borders are complete despite the appearance of the scan and the paper measures 17 by 11 inches. It has been dry mounted, an old method of paper preservation where a heat process is used to mount the item on a board. I don't know if this process can be undone but at this point I don't see any damage caused by the process. I would recommend that it be de-acidified, however. Re condition:, I do see a separation in the right hand border and some stains but other than that it seems in remarkable condition. The paper reports of the assassination and contains the incorrect announcement of the death of Seward. It also reports that there was "no celebration in Nashville." Nashville, of course was occupied by Union forces.

(Sold)
Email to a friend

Early Copy of the Lincoln Conspirators Hangings
Item #: NEW-008244

Click image to enlarge
This images measures 6 1/4 X 8 1/4 inches and is mounted on a light board. See the back side which shows evidence of an old water stain (not affecting the image) and scotch tape residue. Period hand writing which I can't read all of " ? Brady photo ? Lincoln hangings scarce and important." Regarding condition of the photo itself, there are a couple of cracks in the surface at the bottom edge. Clarity of the image is murky but I have not seen the original photographs in order to compare. I do believe this is an early 1900's copy but this is a guess.

(Sold)
Email to a friend

CDV's-West Point Ga Volunteer Firefighters
Item #: NEW-008222

Click image to enlarge
Two rare images in this lot which were found in a La Grange Georgia civil war era estate. I was lucky enough to find one of the images in the book, Treasures of Troup County by Glenda Major & Clark Johnson which included a newspaper copy of the image with the "new wood burning steam powered water pumping wagon." The date given was 1870 and the building they were posed before was "unknown." I would imagine that several of the men assembled were Confederate veterans. Both have backmarks of J M. Tomlinson Columbus Georgia. Tomlinson also had a studio in La Grange.

(Sold)
Email to a friend

Identified UCV Medallion-Army of TN-Louisiana Div
Item #: NEW-008176

Click image to enlarge
I believe this is a rare United Confederate Veteran reunion item. This item is at least 14 K and is the size of a quarter. I don't believe this is an enameled middle but neither does it look painted. Perhaps it was mounted on some type of gemstone. The AT stands for Army of Tennessee, which was one of the New Orleans' UCV Camps (Camp No 2) A pelican is in the middle of the medal. The back is engraved, giving the name of the officer, Major James H Trezevant, 1st La Infantry. Also given are the dates of the Civil War. Trezevant is listed in Booth's Records of Louisiana Confederate Soldiers. He entered as a 1st Lt and was promoted to Captain, according to the records. The suffered a head wound, probably at Shiloh and was sidelined for 30 days. Monthly reports indicate that hThe back is engraved, giving the name of the officer, Major James H Trezevant, 1st La Infantry. Also given are the dates of the Civil War. Trezevant is listed in Booth's Records of Louisiana Confederate Soldiers. He entered as a 1st Lt and was promoted to Captain, according to the records. The suffered a head wound, probably at Shiloh and was sidelined for 30 days. Monthly reports indicate e commanded his company and also mentions that he was involved in the Staff, which would be indicative of a Major. The 1st Louisiana Infantry (Strawbridge) was active in the Battle of Franklin and it is possible that he received a field promotion as a result of the loss of so many high ranking officers. My thanks to Vann Martin for helping me with the research on this item.

(Sold)
Email to a friend

Civil War Era Pinfire Revolver
Item #: NEW-008154

Click image to enlarge
Buying weapons is not something I do but this gun was at the botttom of a box containing Civil War pamplets and maps that I purchased. There are no markings that I can see. A friend looked at it and showed me that it is in perfect working order and mentioned that it was probably Belgian made.l I have no idea as to the value, but hopefully have left room for the next buyer. The trigger folds up and the sight has a very sharp tip. Hopefully the scan will show the condition.

(Sold)
Email to a friend

Confederate General James Longstreet Photograph
Item #: NEW-008145

Click image to enlarge
This mounted image measures 4 by 5 and 3/4 inch. Period hand writing on the back says "General Longstreet from 1901." Great post war pose with him in a Confederate Reunion uniform, a fancy belt with an eagle on the buckle, a sword, and wearing a CV metal Badge attached to a ribbon with a Confederate flag on it. I'm not familiar with the other medal. Good condition with good clarity. The mount has probably been trimmed.

(Sold)
Email to a friend

Half Plate Ambro-Thermoplastic Case-N Y Militia
Item #: NEW-008007

Click image to enlarge
Paypal will not be accepted on this item, though payments can be arranged. Good clarity on this pose of a soldier, probably member of the New York Militia. The number 7 can be seen on his hat. This is an ambrotype. The black plate was missing and I replaced the makeshift plate, which was in poor condition with black acid free paper. One of the corners of the glass ambro is chipped off but is masked by the brass frame preserver. The image is tinted and gilded. This case is listed as rare in Krainik's book. The old value guide places it at $175. The case looks good for the most part however, there are splits in the thermoplastic which holds the upper hinge on the blank side. I also had to remove the cloth frames just to get the images to fit into the frame. They are still sticking out some so that the case doesn't close but I'm not going to force them in. The ambrotype was improperly assembled so to correct that I had to take it apart. They never seem to go back in the way they come out. t I have switched the brass preserver which is tarnished in the scan to the other side. Please view the scans.

(Sold)
Email to a friend

Rare CDV-Bishop Quintard-Chaplin Army of Tenn
Item #: NEW-007883

Click image to enlarge
Paypal is not available on this item. This is an unrecorded image of Bishop Charles Todd Quintard who was the Chaplin of the Army of Tennessee. C C Giers backmark. The CDV has been autographed by Quintard and presented to Col Horace Rice, "To Col Horace Rice with a blessing of his friend." Rice was a hero in the Battle of Franklin. Please view the scans of the front and back to view the condition, which includes some stains. Charles Todd Quintard was the second bishop of Episcopal Diocese of Tennessee and the first Vice-Chancellor of the University of the South at Sewanee. He was born in Connecticut, studied medicine at the University Medical College New York University and Bellevue Hospital, and moved to Memphis to teach physiology and pathological anatomy at Memphis Medical College. Under the influence of Bishop James Hervey Otey, Quintard studied for holy orders and entered the priesthood in the 1850's. During the Civil War he was a chaplain and a surgeon in the Confederate Army of Tennessee. Col Horace Rice served with the 29th Tennessee Infantry Regiment. He was wounded & captured at the Battle of Franklin, where his division held and broke the line against the advancing Federal army. This excerpt is from the online archive of Terry's Texas Rangers. "..the main line of the enemy's defenses was broken by the left of Gordon's Brigade, under the splendid leadership of Col Horace Rice, commanding his (the Twenty ninth) and my old regiemnt (the Eleventh Tennessee infantry) consolidated..."

(Sold)
Email to a friend

Rare Tennessee Note-County of Cocke-Five Dollars
Item #: NEW-007820

Click image to enlarge
Nice appearance on this note with minor condition problems. Crease which runs through the figure of the Indian Maiden with tiny tear at the top. Another tiny tear at left hand edge, barely noticible. See scan to view the borders. This note is Garland number 1330 and it has a rarity value of 14. Dated April 1, 1863. Scrip.

(Sold)
Email to a friend

1863 Letter-Lt Col-27th Conn Vol-KIA-Gettysburg
Item #: NEW-007750

Click image to enlarge
Two page letter dated Febuary 10, 1863 from a grouping of letters written by Lt. Col Henry Merwin with the 27th Connecticut Volunteers Regiment. Merwin served in the Connecticut State Sentate before the war and was Commander of the Twenty Seventh. He was killed on July 2, 1863 at the Battle of Gettysburg. This letter is signed simply, Henry. This letter was written to his brother and the cover is included. Here is the content that is not personal. "We have tried to get a flag of truce to get Captain John Wise's body but can not get one now. We would get it if a flag could be had but permission will not be granted." Some content concerns his life insurance coming due and questions as to whether the "War risk is all right". "Things are quiet here, a few troupes(sic) went up on our right this morning about a division. We see in some papers our Surgeon Hill is dismissed for stealing property and sending it home. There is no truth in it. He found this side of the river after the fight nowhere near a house. A very nice broach and a few trinkets so after we got settled he put them in a box and sent them on. I suppose the Provost Marshall got hold of them and that is what kicked up the mess. He is a noble fellow and has done nicer work than many old Surgeons and he is a strict forward man. Yours in Haste, Henry." The cover is cancelled Washington and is tied to a 3 cent Washington stamp. Letter is addressed to Messers J. E. Merwin & Son New Haven Conn.

(Sold)
Email to a friend

Samuel H Stout-UCV Certificate-John Gordon Signature
Item #: NEW-007636

Click image to enlarge
This certificate was issued to a very important Confederate Veteran-Samuel Hollingsworth Stout, a doctor who served on the staff of General John Gordon and was also the Medical Director of the Confederate Hospitals. The certificate was issued to S H Stout MD Colonel and 4th Asst Surgeon General Staff of General John B Gordon. Stout had family roots in Tennessee, Georgia and finally Texas. There is a great deal of information on the Web about Stout and his biography is included in books, among them "Confederate Hospitals on the Move." The certificate measures nineteen and a half by sixteen and a half inches. There are three vertical folds and one horizontal fold. Wear to these folds including some separations which thankfully have no tape on them. Chipping to the right hand edge and small missing area at bottom mid edge. Authentic signature of General Gordon. This item was originally obtained from the collection of Stanley Horn. Here is some of Stout's history who was born in Nashville Tennessee. He began his practice with his brother Josiah in Nashville, later moving to Pulaski Tennessee. When the war began Stout enlisted in the 3rd Tennessee (Clack's) Infantry in May of 1861. He was commissioned by the Provisional Army of Tennessee as a surgeon and ordered to his assignment at Gordon Hospital in Nashville. He was commissioned into the Confederate Services in April of 1862. He was assigned to take charge of the hospitals in Chattanooga Tunnel Hill, Ringgold, Dalton, and all hospitals opened between Chattanooga and Atlanta. He later was put in charge of hospitals at Catoosa Springs Georgia and Cleveland Tennessee. Eventually Stout became the Medical Director of Hospitals of the Army of Tennessee. Following the war Stout returned to Pulaski but left shortly to become professor of pathological anatomy at the Atlanta Medical College. In 1869 entered private practice and lived in Atlanta but relocated in 1882 moving to Texas. He was a prominent physician in Texas, dying in 1903. He is buried in Oakland Cemetery in Dallas Texas.

(Sold)
Email to a friend

Clarksville Tennessee Confederate Newspaper
Item #: NEW-007623

Click image to enlarge
This paper is titled the Clarksville Chronicle and is the only Confederate Newspaper I have ever seen from Clarksville. This large paper opens up to four pages. Condition is apparent from the scans which include large oval stains, and a small brown area which goes through both pages, some edge tears and foxing. The paper is dated October 4, 186l. What makes this paper very rare is Clarksville was occupied very early in the war after the fall of Fort Donelson in early February of 1862. Content on the first page is exclusively war related including a report of the Battle of Lexington and a Proclamation by Isham Harris calling for enlistment in the Confederate effort. There is a ballot on the inside page for Jefferson Davis and Alexander Stephens for President and Vice President of the Confederate States, and the Confederate Constitution takes up half of the last page. Many ads of Clarksville dealers. The inclusion of the Confederate ballot, Consitution, and call to arms by Governor Harris makes this not only a rare but signicant issue which was originally in the collection of Stanley Horne.

(Sold)
Email to a friend

Photograph-General Leonidis Polk-KIA-Army of Tn
Item #: NEW-007598

Click image to enlarge
This is a postwar copy photograph of Leonidis Polk, General in the Army of Tennessee and killed by cannon fire at Kennesaw Mountain. This photo measures 5 by seven inches and is a scarce pose of Polk in his Confederate Uniform. This was found in an auction along with an albumen of Jefferson Davis in an auction in Charleston South Carolina. Both photographs has "Cook" on the back, presumed to be the famous photographer George Cook. I have been unable to find out if Cook took this photograph of Polk or just made a copy of it. The clarity of the photograph was indicate that it was made from the original negative. Home made paper frame with handwriting which reads, " Lieut General Leonidis Polk, C.S.A as he looked about time he was killled."

(Sold)
Email to a friend

Additional Pages
[Previous Page]  1   2  3  4   5  [Next Page]
Catalog Updated
10/30/2020 11:39:00 AM
Dr's Medicine Chest-Contents-Colonial

$4,000.00

Copyright © 2020 TennRebGirl.com All rights reserved.
Powered by Web-Cat Copyright © 1996-2020 GrayCat Systems