SOLD
Civil War
Daily Huntsville Confederate-Rare Traveling Newspaper-Marietta Ga
Item #: NEW-0013668

Click image to enlarge
This is an example of a rare paper which started in Huntsville Alabama but ended up on the run from federal occupation.  The history of this paper is very murky although it is clear that specimens published on the run are quite rare.  This paper has numerous problems as can be seen in the scans so I'm not going to list them all.   It appears to have been handled by a wanna-be restorer who ended up causing more damage due to excessive bleaching and improper pressing.  Clearly as can be seen in the scan, there are multiple stains and a large hole which is probably a cigarette burn.

This is a single sheet, printed on both sides. dated September 3, 1863 and published in Marietta Georgia.  Editor J Withers Clay.  There is a lengthy report of the President to the Soldiers of the Confederate States.  There are areas so light that you cannot read the text.  More visible on the reverse page are a run away slave ad, notices to Conscripts, and rewards for reporting deserters.    

The historical significance of this paper trumps the poor condition, in my opinion.  I found another example of this paper in one of Gary Hendershot's catalogue from 1999, listed for $3,500.  This paper was printed in Chattanooga in August 11, 1863,  After the occupation of the federal army, the paper probably moved on to Georgia. It would be a worthy project to attempt to make a historical account of this paper.  Am selling this paper, as is.

(Sold)
Email to a friend

17th Texas Vol Infantry Regiment-Letters-Theodore A Supple
Item #: NEW-0013665

Click image to enlarge
This lot consists of five items, though only partial scans are shown. 

 The very small note sized letter is from Supple to his wife, Mary Supple and is two pages long. This letter is dated November 25th, 1863 from Alexandria Louisiana. The cover is addressed to Mrs. Mary F Supple Belton, Bell County Texas.  Also written on the over is 17th Regiment, T V I, Lowrey's Brigade Walker's Division. There are two confederate stamps on the cover with no signs of cancellation. Here is some of the content:

Letter opens with instructions to his wife on how to make a sack coat.  Some further husband talk. " We are still post guard at this place.  Our division is on the Miss about 90 miles from here, firing on gun boats, transport and with about 30 pieces of artillery we sunk one transport and fired into two others which run back.  The groans of the wounded on those two was horrible.  They are now paroling about 670 prisoners 3 miles from this place.  They were so delighted at the thoughts of being paroled that they slept none the first night they heard it and not much since, about half of them say if they could ever get home they would never return to their army any more.  They say they would be protected at home.  I don't like to talk to them.  They are so ? that there is no satisfaction in conversing with them.  It is a matter of wonder to the boys to see their ignorance, even Captains knowing comparatively nothing.  One or two of them say they will kill me if they ever have an opportunity.  I told them I would not own a negro who had not more intelligence than the average of them"  rest is family talk.  Signed T A Supple.

The second item is a blue rag legal sized paper with writing on both sides.  "My dear  husband" and signed Mrs. F Supple, no doubt another family member.  Date but no year given.  "I received a letter from Ma yesterday.." James (?) was drafted will leave soon.  They did no know where they would go.  Captain Pratt gave him a fine horse.  Ma had an Indian Squaw  there these days.  She had been taken prisoner and ran away from them and came to Ma's in the night.  More but very difficult to read so I give up.  James she referred to is probably JJ Supple who was also with the 17th.

The third item is as a three page letter written on rag paper to Mary from her Mother.  This letter is badly stained and the misspellings and phonetic words makes it difficult to read.  She does mention that the "Lampasas Company is to be mustered out today and then James will be home."  The letter was mailed as a stampless cover but there are no postal markings on it.  The letter was roughly opened causing a strip of lost content toward the end.   

Additional items are a  cover addressed to Mary Supple in Belton, Bell Country Texas.  It has a confederate stamp on it. There is a date written on it October 15th 1862 in another hand. I don't know if the postmaster would have written that or not but there are no cancels on the cover.

The last item is an envelope relating to Mary Supple's husband's confederate pension.  Hard fold and almost separated. 

Clearly all these items came from some one's estate and I've done the best I can to sort it out.

Here is a link which gives the history of the Seventeenth Texas Infantry: http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/qks12

(Sold)
Email to a friend

Orphan Brigade-CSA-1915 Postcard-32nd Reunion
Item #: NEW-0013596

Click image to enlarge
I believe this postcard to be very rare. The card was addressed to Judge Emory Speer, a very important man who joined the 5th Ky Regiment at the age of 16 and went on to become a prominent lawyer, judge, and politician in Georgia.  

The card is in poor condition with numerous creases but is still striking in the graphics.  Features General Breckenridge, Hanson, Hewitt, Helm, Lew, Wright and Buckner.  The reunion was held in Harrodsburg Kentucky.  Thos D Osborne Sec'y Louisville Ky.    

(Sold)
Email to a friend

Gen Thomas Benton Smith ALS
Item #: NEW-0013349

Click image to enlarge
Reduced price

This is the most significant of the letters of Smith that I have offered as he mentions his sword which was used to bash in his head at the Battle of Nashville, causing him to spend 47 years of his life in an "insane asylum."  Following the transcription there is a history of Smith, one of the youngest and most promising Confederate Generals and his sad end.

 This is a two page letter on note sized paper, front to back address to Will Carter dated March 25th 1903.  The content of the letter reflects his mental condition.

Here is the content of the letter:

Will Carter

"You weighed me and Ludy Woodord on your patent scales in the store built by James Turbiville a soldier of the 20th and 81st Tennessee."

"Wounded at the Battle of Nashville when I left my horse bridle saddle sword and side arms with General W B Bate Dec 16 1864.  When I went north to make peace between the Confederate soldiers of American and the United States of America as printed on all Confederate bills and President Jeff Davis the Democrat, served 2 years in Fortress Monroe and was release a hero by ? Bend while I was conductor N & C RR I order Thomas Dickerson to take my"... (rest is impossible to read)

Signed Tom Benton Smith President SA Cunningham Vice President March 25th 1903

Smith was born in Mechanicsville Tennessee in 1838. A bright young man with a gift of mechanical inventiveness, he received a patent for a locomotive pilot at the age of 15. He enrolled in the Nashville Military Academy (Western Military Institute) He was working for the Nashville & Decatur Railroad when the war broke out. He gave up that job to help raise a company of volunteers in and around Triune. That company merged with a group raised by Joel A Battle and eventually became Company B of the 20th Tennessee Infantry. 

Smith saw combat action in the Battle of Mill Springs and Shiloh. Smith was promoted to Colonel at the age of 22. Wounded seriously in the Battle of Murfreesboro-Stones River and was out of action for much of 1863. He resumed field duties and led his troops at Baton Rouge, Hoover's Gap & Chickamauga when he was again wounded. He was promoted to Brigadier General on July 29,1864 becoming the youngest General in the Army of Tennessee. At the battle of Franklin, his staff officer Tod Carter was killed within sight of his home and Smith informed the parents and searched the battlefield for his body. During the battle of Nashville, Smith surrendered and was captured by Union Colonel William L McMillan who beat Smith about the head with Smith's own sword, leaving his brain exposed and in a comma. Smith was not expected to live but recovered only to become a prisoner at Fort Warren. Released July 24th, 1865. Smith did some railroad work after the Civil War and ran for a seat in the U S Congress in 1870, but lost. Struggling with the permanent damage he suffered to his brain, Smith spent his last 47 years in an insane asylum in Nashville, appearing occasionally at UCV reunions.

reduced price

General Thomas Benton Smith

(Sold)
Email to a friend

Ambrotype-Confederate Soldier-Heavily Armed
Item #: NEW-0013314

Click image to enlarge
Great sixth plate ambrotype in a worn and separated case.  There is some damage to the image which can be seen in the scans. He is holding one gun and has another in the same area probably stuck in his belt.  He has a dagger stuck in his belt as well and he appears to be holding the hilt of a sword, the rest of which cannot be seen. The soldier has the stare of a man that has seen battle.  I can provide no history on this soldier. No paypal on this item though payment plans can be arranged.

(Sold)
Email to a friend

9th Michigan Inf Soldier letters-Nathan Bedford Forrest Raid-More
Item #: NEW-0013162

Click image to enlarge
This lot consists of five letters written by James H Smails who enrolled in the beginning of the war as a Sgt with the 9th Michigan Infantry, G Company.  At some point he later had service with the U S Army 11th Infantry. I will begin with the most important letter (though it is out of order) in which he describes the furious surprise raid of Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest during the first Battle of Murfreesboro.   

The letter is four pages, possibly incomplete.  It is written from Camp Chase in Columbus Ohio, dated July 31st with no year but would be 1862.  It is written to Jennie Livingston from Saline Michigan who was his cousin.  I am skipping the personal content. I have scanned only one page. There is wear to the mid folds with one small and one larger hole.

.."You will be anxious to hear from me as you have probably seen my name on the list of the wounded. I am getting along fne and expect to be in Michigan in a few weeks.  I was wounded in the early part of the engagement .  The ball striking me in the left side and passing through to the right side where it lodged and was afterwards cut out.

We were completely surprised about day light on the morning of July 13th by three thousand five hundred cavalry under command of the Rebel General Forrest of Georgia. part of our Regiment being on detached service there were five companys (250 men) in camp.  The 3rd Minnesota Regt was encamped on the other side of town nearly 200 miles distant and they could render us little assistance, the attack was first made upon our camp  they came upon us before we were hardly out of our beds.  but the boys fought bravely and repulsed and drove them from the field twice.  they then returned to the town to destroy our commissary stores. our skirmishes continued fighting until noon when it was perceived that it was useless to hold out any longer against such overwhelming numbers.  the Rebels then came into our camp and after taking every thing noticeable set fire to our tents and clothing and started with the prisoners in the direction of Chattanooga.  I do not wish to criticize the officers of the 3rd Minn Regt but I think they were scared into a surrender.  They had four pieces of artillery and nearly a full regiment of infantry and in the opinion of a great many could have defeated the enemy had they fought like the 9th Michigan.  We are now prisoners of war having been all paroled and for my part we shall never be exchanged."  Letter is not signed and may be incomplete possibly due to being a POW. The letter was written in the hand of James H Smails as can be seen by examining the other letters in this lot. The letter has one edge tear and some stains.  The smudge in two areas is where someone, most probably a child penciled over the word but I was able to erase a lot of it.    

The second listing is a two page legal sized blue rag letter, sent from Muldraugh Hill, Camp Blair which was a Union encampment and training facility.   The letter is dated January 8th 1862 shortly before the first Battle of Murfreesboro. Some breaks at the folds and a couple of stains.  You can see small holes when held to the light not affecting the content.  Signed by J M Smails. I am furnishing a partial transcript of the letter, giving the most interesting content.

The letter is addressed to My Cousin 

"I am pleased with the life of a soldier.  I have been the least sick so far and if you could see me I guess you would think there was no danger of my being so very soon for I never was so busy in my life.  The health of the Regiment has improved very much since I wrote last.  On Saturday six companies left this camp and marched to a place called Nolin which is about thirty miles from West Point-as soon as another Regiment comes here we expect to follow.  At present our camps looks desolate... I can tell you it will be with pleasure that we join the regiment.” 

The third letter is a three page letter dated June 20th 1862 and is written from Murfreesboro, Camp Park??, again written to his cousin.

"I have been completely tired out with our recent long marches...I have had my first initiation into the hardship of a soldiers life...Our Regiment left camp on the 29th of May and little did we think we were to have forced marches for the next sixteen days over mountains, through valleys and under the heat of a burning Southern sun.  A distance of four hundred miles before we returned to it again. but we did it and in my opinion accomplished comparatively little.  although we had the satisfaction of a few shots at the Secesh and the pleasure of seeing them get out of the city as fast as they could comfortably and I think a little faster than was agreeable to the most of them."

"The Brigade to which our Regmt is attached arrived at Chattanooga on Saturday night June 7th and on Sunday Morning the 9th Mich was ordered forward and at fifteen minutes past here we commenced firing upon the enemy which were upon the opposite side of the River but as the distance was almost to great for our small arms the fire was not very effective and the fighting was done principally with artillery.Our cannons soon silenced the Artillery of the Rebels and in the afternoon they evacuated the city we expected to go over and occupy it but the General Commanding said the objective for which we came had been accomplished and we immediately commenced our homeward march we reached Murfreesboro just sixteen days from the time we started. having crossed the Cumberland Mountains four times since our return we have removed our camp and I think we have if anything a pleasanter one than before." The rest of the content is personal lamenting the marriage of his girl friend.  Signed by J M Smails, Murfreesboro Tennessee.

The last letter of substance is three and a half pages and is written from Fort Independence, Boston Harbor, dated May 12th 1863.  Fairly large separation at one of the center folds, along with a small edge tear.  It is also addressed to his cousin.  Full signature but the gremlin with a pencil has blackened his initial and last name.
   
Smiles begins his letter explaining why he had not written sooner.  "...I have several times been within a few miles of your home, while the 27th infantry was at Cincinnati.  I was there twice, looking for deserters, but did not have time to visit you.  I was stationed at Detroit for some months on recruiting service for the regular army...”I have been in the field but little since I was taken prisoners, luckily for me I was detached from the Regiment and ordered to report at this post for duty.  It is really a delightful place only a mile and a half out in the Harbor and but a few rods from the main channel, and we have such a fine view of all vessels from our ocean steamship down to the pleasure yacht, some of which are passing continually.... The Regiment is now in Virginia and participated in the late Battle at Fredericksburg.  A good many from my company were killed and sounded, some of them very intimate friends, how fortunate that I am so far from the fields of slaughter...Rest in personal.  Signed James H Smiles with the initial and last name blotted out with pencil. 

As noted I have not scanned all of the pages of the letters.  Only one of the covers appears to belong to a letter, the Forrest raid one.  The dealer I purchased this lot from found them in her Aunt's estate but clearly some were lost over the years.

The last scans show all of the covers which came with the lot.  The first one shown may belong to the Forrest Raid letter, The second one has a faint cancel from Boston Mass with the stamp cut off and only part of the Paid showing.  The third is from Cincinnati Ohio with a clear and fancy cancel.  The next has a clear cancel from Boston and a fancy cancel over the stamp.  It is separated on three sides and nearly separated at the bottom.  Finally there is the back of one letter with a stamp and his finger print pressed in it.


Shipping Weight: 2 lbs
Price: $858.00 USD
Email to a friend

Confederate Diary-Tintype-Letters-Crenshaw Battery-Gettysburg
Item #: NEW-0013101

Click image to enlarge
Paypal will not be accepted on this item but payment plans can be arranged.

The listing includes the diary of James F Newman, a tintype of him in his uniform, and a collection of letters written to his wife. Newman fought at Fredericksburg, Gettysburg, Chancellorsville and was involved in several  skirmishes.  

The first scan shows a sixth plate tintype of Newman in his uniform.  Complete case but detached.  Good condition except for the partial outline from a previous case preserver.     

The next item is the diary of Newman who enlisted on March 14 1862 in Crenshaw’s Battery-Pegram’s Artillery Battalion- 3rd Corps-Army of Northern Virginia. He was enrolled as a corporal but was reduced to a private after an illness. At some point, he joined Captain Fry’s Virginia Light Artillery.  Newman served until his capture at Five Forks when he was imprisoned at Point Lookout until Lee’s surrender. Newman was a policeman before his enlistment and after the war served as an assembly member.   


The diary is small as can be seen in the scan and is battered from being carried in the war.  It is confusing as with most old diaries it was also used by children scribbling, in this case drawings as well as notations prior to and after the war.  

There are 45 pages of his war entries in the first part of the book and it continues after non relevant pages toward the back of the book for a few pages.  Strangely these are not entries later in the war, but earlier.  The handwriting was difficult at times but mostly legible. 

 The diary covers the dates Oct 12 1862 through December 25, 1863.  Much of the diary is taken up with the difficult marches, lack of food, camp and personal news but there is battle content, including  Fredericksburg and Gettysburg. 

Content of diary was deleted. 



(Sold)
Email to a friend

General John B Gordon Post War ALS-Great Content
Item #: NEW-0013097

Click image to enlarge
This is this a four page letter addressed to "My Dear Col:”  The letter is dated June 15th, 1871. Two pages (3 + of content) on the graphic letterhead of Nashville’s most famous hotel, The Maxwell House.  The Maxwell House was the gathering place for the national leaders visiting Nashville. My best guess is that Gordon and Nathan Bedford Forrest were meeting there to discuss their upcoming appearance before a Congressional Committee investigating the activities of the KKK.   Gordon was known to be the titular leader of the early organization of the KKK but he denied this charge. Forrest, of course, also denied that he was the founder of the Ku Klux Klan before the committee.    

The letter is actually a summation of Gordon’s activities during the Civil War.  He was, of course, known for his ferocious leadership of the men who served with him.

Here is the complete transcript:  I have not scanned the entire letter in which he is responding to a request from the "Col” to summarize his Civil War service.

"Yours directed to Atlanta has been forwarded to me here and I give you as nearly I can remember the dates of my commissions.

I was promoted to the rank of Col in April 1862.  To Brig Gen after the battle of Sharpsburg in Maryland-in which battle I was shot 5 times .I do not remember the precise date of this commission.  

My promotion to Maj General was in consequence of my repulse of Hancock at Spotsylvania C H.-when he broke our lines & captured Gen Ed Johnson 7 command-12th May 1864,

I was then place in command of the 2nd Corps in December 1864 & commanded it until the end of the war & after the retreat from Petersburg & Richmond .  I commanded one half of the Army of Longstreet ??at the surrender.  Should you desire any further information, you will find the most correct acct in Pollard’s book-”Lee & His Lieutenants”-  I think it is called.  While not correct as I learn in many respects his acct of my services are more accurate than any I have seen any where else.  

With the hope that the delay consequence of my absence from my house may not inconvenience you, I am truly yours, J B Gordon.

Gordon then adds this P.S.

My Brigade was composed of 6 Ga Regts-13th-26th-31st-60th.

My Div was composed at first of my old Brigade, afterwards commanded by Brig Gen C A Evans of GA-the Va Brigade formerly commanded by Gen Pegram, then by Gen Terry of Va-and Johnson’s N Carolina Brig-caused by Brig Gen Robt Johnson of N. C. to which was added the La Brigade of Hayes & Stafford consolidated & commanded by Brig Gen York.

My Corps was Jackson’s-the 2nd Army Corps-composed of my old Div, just given above commanded by Gen Evans-of the Div formerly commanded by Gen Rodes and the old "Stonewall” Div of Virginians, commanded by Gen Jno Pegram & after his death by Gen Ramseur of  N.C. & afterwards by Gen Bryan Grimes-N.C.

To my corps were added on the retreat from Petersburg the remnants of several divisions-giving me nearly half of the army.

Condition:  One small tear at mid edge.  Both pages are slightly tacked to another sheet of paper at the left edge.


  

     


(Sold)
Email to a friend

ALS-John Mosby-Partisan Ranger-Great Content-Post War
Item #: NEW-0013094

Click image to enlarge
Five pages of content on a letter to "Gaston", dated July 19,1904, signed by Jno S Mosby. The letter is on the letterhead of the Department of Justice, Washington D C. Here is a partial transcription. I have omitted the personal content. Included in the listing is the circular announcing "Recollections of a Mosby Guerrilla" for the September issue of the periodical Munsey written by John W Munson, including a letter from Col. Mosby to Munson." Of course Munson later published a book with the title of Recollections of a Mosby Guerrilla.  Some edge tears.

    Paypal will not be available on this letter but payment plans can be arranged.

Dear Gaston,

     As I write the date of this I am reminded that on this date, 43 years ago I was a private in the First Va Cavalry marching with Joe Johnston from the Shenandoah Valley to join Beauregard at Mannassas.  How little I then thought that I would ever hold an office under the U S Government.  I enclose a circular which I want you to give to my friend ? Freeman...I suppose of course the South will be solid for Parker  (Alton)T.  She is joined to her idols.  I think our friend Teddy (Roosevelt) did some injustice in connection with my appointment.  I told you that in my presence he dictated a letter to the Attorney General  that he desired my appointment.  It was not made.  I was sent to Alabama.  I then doubted his sincerity.  I do not not doubt it now.  The hitch was at the Dept of Justice-not at the White House.  why I do not know.  I had no idea when I left Montgomery that I was not to be returning in a few weeks.  I had no intention of making any attempt to get a transfer but some of my friends here-without my knowledge saw the President and got it done. (there is more on this issue of him being transferred that I have omitted).

"I have just received a most urgent invitation to a great reunion of the Blue and Gray in Boston on August 13.  The President is expected and they expect 25 Confederates....In reply I have given a very indefinite answer.  The truth is I have no idea of going.  My old battalion also has a reunion on August 12th at Berryville in the Shenandoah Valley.  I will not go to it.  You know my aversion to such things...personal content and closing with his signature on the last page.

(Sold)
Email to a friend

UCV Ribbon-Morgan's Cavalry-John Hunt Morgan
Item #: NEW-0013090

Click image to enlarge
Handsome and scarce silk ribbon for General John Hunt Morgan's men.  Ribbon measures 8 by 3 inches. A couple to teeny spots.  No pay pal on this item though payment plans can be arranged. 

(Sold)
Email to a friend

Rare CDV-Confederate General Frank C Armstrong
Item #: NEW-0013066

Click image to enlarge
CDV's of General Frank Armstrong are quite rare.  This one is post war.  The notation "Frank C Armstrong  Brig Gen. Cavalry Division, Army of Tennessee, C S A." was made on the original image.  This is not a modern copy and there are no little dots in the image.  

Here is a history of Armstrong taken from Wikipedia:

Armstrong was born on the Choctaw Agency in the Indian Territory, where his army officer father had been stationed. Armstrong's father, Francis Wells Armstrong, died three months before his son's birth. In 1854, Armstrong's mother married Mexican-American War General Persifor Smith. In 1854, Armstrong accompanied his stepfather on an expedition of the United States Army troops into the New Mexico Territory. His gallantry in a battle against Indians near Eagle Spring gained him a commission as a lieutenant in 1855, following his graduation from Holy Cross Academy in Massachusetts. Armstrong then fought with Albert Sidney Johnston against the Mormons during the Utah War.

Civil War service

By the time of the Civil War, Armstrong was a captain in the regular army. He led a company of Union cavalry at the First Battle of Bull Run. However, Armstrong resigned his commission and on August 10, 1861, he joined the Confederate Army. As Armstrong's Union resignation did not go into effect until August 13, he was technically on both sides at the same time. He served as a staff officer under Confederate generals James M. McIntosh and Benjamin McCulloch before their deaths at the Battle of Pea Ridge, and was standing only feet away as McCulloch was killed.

In 1863 Armstrong was elected as colonel of the 3rd Louisiana Infantry Regiment, and was soon given command of the cavalry of Major General Sterling Price. Two months later, he was promoted to brigadier general and commanded a cavalry division under Nathan Bedford Forrest at the Battle of Chickamauga.

In February 1864, Armstrong requested a transfer to the command of Maj. Gen. Stephen D. Lee. He was assigned command of a brigade of Mississippi cavalry previously led by Colonel Peter B. Starke. Armstrong and his men accompanied Lt. Gen. Leonidas Polk's corps to Georgia and served in the Atlanta Campaign, before participating in Lt. Gen. John B. Hood's disastrous campaign. He saw action during the campaign against Murfreesboro, and led much of Forrest's rear guard after the Hood's defeat at the Battle of Nashville.

On March 23, Armstrong was assigned to the defenses of Selma, Alabama, one of the Confederacy's last remaining industrial centers. On April 2, 1865, his troops participated in efforts to defend the town against a much larger Union force under Maj. Gen James H Wilson and was captured later that day.

(Sold)
Email to a friend

Nathan Bedford Forrest-His Railroad Ticket
Item #: NEW-0012895

Click image to enlarge
Note:  The previous price on this item was a listing error.

There is no date on the ticket but is post war as his title is given as President of S M & M RR which is Selma, Marion, Memphis Railroad.  Heavy stock which is typical of this era railroad passes.  This came out of a long time collection. No condition problems. Paypal will not be accepted on this item, though payment plans can be set up.

(Sold)
Email to a friend

1895 Detailed Letter-Sketches-Battle of Franklin-Johnny to a Reb
Item #: NEW-0012889

Click image to enlarge
This lot consists of a two page letter which contains a great deal of information by a participant on the Union side who is writing to a former Confederate officer. The handwriting is perfectly legible but the second page is a strain to read due to the smaller handwriting.  Also included are six pages of drawings and written information.  The writer seemed to be obsessed with determining the layout of the battle field and where all the regiments were stationed.  The information was mailed to J P Young who was a Captain and author of his regimental history, The Seventh Tennessee Cavalry as well as other books.  All of the pages have W D Thompson at the top left.  Since he mentions "my boys” in the letter I assume that he was in the Battle of Franklin.  Civil War records do show a Sgt. William D Thompson with the Ohio 97th Infantry which was engaged at Franklin.

I will not be transcribing the complete letter but here is some of the content. It is evident from the content that the two men had exchanged previous letters regarding "the tragic events of Franklin.”

Thompson writes that he has continued his research of the battle, including an intense study of the Official Records (some of which information he thinks is false), several communications with some of the participants.  "I trust that the future historians will give that the full prominence to which it is entitled (Battle of Franklin), as an example of American heroism.  

" Two of Col M B Carter’s sons (the former owner and occupant of the Carter House) live at Clay Center Kansas, 50 miles from me, whose acquaintances I have made and with one of them I have had an interesting correspondence.  The latter was about 10 years old at the close of the war, was in the old mansion Nov 30, 18694 and well remembers many things on that faithful day.”  He goes on to say he expects a visit soon from one of them and that he will try to get a sketch from him of the old place.”

He further writes by a careful reading of the "Report” I find it not difficult to locate the Regiments engaged on the Federal side…”

"I met 69 of "my boys” at Colfax’s home and learned some things from them which shed light on events of the battle, as they were all engaged & some wounded.”

Thompson goes on to give and lists the battalions, officers, and their locations.  The information is very detailed.  

As mentioned there are six pages of drawings also including information about the divisions.  Only one scan is attached to this listing as well as only the first page of the letter. 


(Sold)
Email to a friend

Field Document-2nd Arkansas Mounted Rifles-Signed 3 Generals
Item #: NEW-0012853

Click image to enlarge
Paypal will not be accepted on this item though payment plans can be arranged.

This is a legal sized double page document.  Folds have some small separations on the first page but the second page which bears the signatures of three Generals also contains some separations, including a very long one.  The appearance of the second page back is quite dark in one area which can be seen in the scan. The heavily stained area does not contain the signatures. The document has been placed loosely between two sheets of mylar to protect it.

The document has been signed by Daniel Harris Reynolds. He has signed D H Reynolds Brig General (see scan).  The second signature is by Edward Cary Walthall, Maj General.  The third signature is by A P (Alexander Peter) Steward, Lieut General.  The document is also signed in two places by Major James P. Eagle, later to become a colonel.   When viewing the scans you may see some reflections from the mylar. 

The document is headed Headquartesr 2nd Ark Mounted Rifles Verona Mississippi, January 19th 1865. The content of the document relates to a fifty five day furlough being awarded, through lottery to Private SA Allen, Co H. Toward the end of the war desertions became rampant in the Confederate forces.  Furloughs were awarded through need and lottery, partially in the hopes that soldiers would be more likely to return from a furlough.  The document covers the conditions that are necessary for granting the furlough to Hempstead County.  It is signed on the first page by J P Eagle. Eagle was wounded and captured at Murfreesboro, sent to Camp Chase, then to City Point Va where he was exchanged.  In July of 1865 he was again wounded at Moores' Mill near Atlanta.

The second scan shows the pass that the soldier would be required to carry and show to all those demanding it.  It has identifying information as well as the private's history and is signed A G Moore, 1st Lt.

The third scan shows the condition of the autographs as described earlier. The middle area has Stewart's signature at the top and a summary of the furlough requirements with pencil notation ""By Order of General Hood.." (not signed by him).  The light area of the third page involves rations being given to the soldier and signed by a couple of other officers whose names I'm not sure of.
 

  

(Sold)
Email to a friend

1863- Document-Signed-Generals-Govan-Liddell-Patrick Cleburne
Item #: NEW-0012475

Click image to enlarge
Paypal will not be accepted on this item. There is a limited warranty of two weeks during which the item can be returned for any reason.  Since this is on consignment I cannot give my usual lifetime guarantee. There have also been  questions as to the authenticity of the Cleburne signature. More on this later in this listing.

Delicate rag paper with some separations at the fold but it is intact.  Folds and slight crumpling along with edge wear and tears. See the scan which shows the envelope the document was found in. 

This incredible document, is dated Sept 30, 1863 and was written in the field. General Daniel Govan is requesting an escort of 2 officers & 12 men from the 2nd Arkansas Regiment be allowed to accompany to Ringgold Georgia the remains of Lt Col Reuben F Harvey who had died of wounds and disease.  Written by the adjutant general but signed by Govan. Handwritten notation by Lt. Col George W Brent, "Approved by command of General Bragg". 

The back of the document bears two signatures of Brig General St John R Liddell, one in which he approves the request and then adds a personal note which is signed by him.  I don't believe the note was written by him but it is signed by him.  "This lamented officer is acknowledged to have been one of the bravest of my command.  His untimely death saddens us all.  He has served from the beginning of the war in all the battles in which his regt has been engaged-Shiloh, Perryville, Murfreesboro, Liberty Gap, Chickamauga, and all over combats.  Religious by nature, zealous in our cause, but weak in constitution he was scarcely able on account of sickness to get through the battle of Chickamauga and at its close went to a sick bed, whilst lying there he heard that an attack was to be made upon the lines of the enemy at Chattanooga  He left his bed to join in the ? upon the place.  The effort proved fatal to him.   He may well be said to have died in harness for the good of the county.  I respectfully request that the proper ceremonies for his burial be allowed as set forth.  Signed by S John R Liddell.  Following this is a pencil note written by Brent but signed by General Patrick Cleburne.  "H Q Cleburne,s Sept 30 1863 "If compatible with the interest of the services I strongly recommend that this tribute to one of the bravest officers I ever knew be accorded."   P R Cleburne.

I believe this to be Cleburne's signature but at least one Civil War autograph expert believes it could be a clever forgery. There is some confusion as to why two of the General's signatures are in ink and only Brent and Cleburne's in pencil. (I have sharpened the scan of Cleburne's signature for better viewing) I would think there could be many reasons why.  Perhaps Brent had obtained the signature of Liddell and Cleburne wanted to add a hasty note to honor a man that was clearly admired by his fellow officers. I am confident that this is not a forgery.  I personally dug this document and other documents saved by William Summerfield Sawrie (Govan's Adjutant General), out of a box in the basement where it had been left undisturbed for years and years. Many other documents were found preserved, including land deeds dating back to 1808, correspondence, slavery documents etc,all relating to four prominent Tennessee families who intermarried. These items were not found together but in scattered boxes in the basement. I have found out over the years in going through family papers  that you learn the character of a family and that is why I find it impossible to believe that anyone in the family would forge Cleburne's name on an authentic document preserved by another family member only to store it.

I am offering this item for what knowledgeable collectors will realize is a great price.  If unsold I will advise my consignor to send this to an auction house which I believe will determine it's authenticity for certain and I have no doubt that it will go for a much higher amount than found  here.



(Sold)
Email to a friend

ALS-Confederate Gen Daniel C Govan-Little Rock UCV Reunion
Item #: NEW-0012428

Click image to enlarge
One page letter all in the hand of Daniel C Govan dated Nov 18th 1878 to his former Adjutant General William Summerfield Sawrie.  The letter has some separations along the folds, two fairly long ones.  The scan shows the writing lighter than it actually is.  I had some problems transcribing the period writing so there may be some errors.   



Dear Sawrie,

You will by this time doubtless have heard that it is our intention to have a "Reunion” of my old command in Little Rock in the 7th of Jan next.  I need not assure (?) you that it will offer me the greatest pleasure to meet you on that occasion for of all the gallant men of my Brig I know of none, whose conduct was more uniformly gallant and soldierly than your own, amid all the trying scenes and firey ordeals through which you passed and to which you continually subjected during a four years bloody war.  Besides you were, very near me as a member of my "staff” on many occasions of that eventful period, and bear me witness, that at least I attempted to do my duty.  So you see, that it is particularly incumbent on us to make an extra effort to be present on that occasion.  I shall write to Capt Williams, also and to Col and Lieut John Warfield if I cn find out his address.  Hutton promised to see you on the subject as he passes through Nashville and deliver my message…the wish that I may see you on that occasion.  
                                         I am always most truly your friend,
                                          D C Govan      


(Sold)
Email to a friend

1863 Document Liddell's Brigade-Signed General Daniel Govan
Item #: NEW-0012412

Click image to enlarge
This document signed by General Govan is from the Head Quarter-Liddell Brigade Bird Hill, dated Oct 3.  I know that the year was 1863 and it was found with other documents only from that time period.  Very rough left edge, folds and a heavy one in one area that needs to be pressed out.  "The undersigned (names) assume a command of the brigade and answer to the following gentlemen of the staff will be be obeyed and respected accordingly."
(note:  I can't stand by the spelling of these names)
Capt G A Birdwell A G M
Capt J W Smythe     A C S
Adj  W S Sawrie     A A A G
1 Lieut J G Warfield  A A A I G 
Sergt N I Durbin Acting ? Off

The document is signed by D C Govan, Col Comand Brigade


(Sold)
Email to a friend

CDV-Marina Gunter-Putnam County Tennessee Legend & Heronine
Item #: NEW-0012348

Click image to enlarge
This CDV found in a family estate in Tennessee had an interesting message written on the back.  "Marina Gunter of Putnam County Tennessee who killed two Federal soldiers with an ax, and wounded another one while they were in the act of murdering her father.  April 1866."  Research on the web indicates that the story may have been embellished somewhat.
See this fascinating link;  http://www.ajlambert.com/history/stry_gt.pdf



(Sold)
Email to a friend

Confederate Broadside-Jefferson Davis On Chickamauga Victory
Item #: NEW-0012344

Click image to enlarge
Paypal will not be accepted on this item. This is a rare opportunity to obtain a very rare Confederate Broadside that is not being offered in an auction. The consignor has agreed to drop the price from what it was originally available for.  Note: Returned to consignor

This broadside was discovered in a Tennessee estate. There are only four public holdings on the web.  It is headed the Headquarters Army of Tennessee, October 14, 1863 and addressed to the Soldiers. Here is just some of the content:

"A grateful country has recognized your arduous service, and rejoiced over your glorious victory on the field of Chickamauga.  When your countrymen shall more fully learn the adverse circumstances under which you attacked the enemy--though they cannot be more thankful--they may admire more the gallantry and patriotic devotion which secured your success."...."your steps have been followed with affectionate solicitude by friends in every portion of the country.  Defenders of the heart of our territory, your movements have been the object of intensest anxiety.  The hopes of our cause greatly depend upon you...Though you have done much, very much, very much remains to be done. Behind you is a people providing your support and depending on you for protection.  Before you is a country devastated by your ruthless invader, where gentle woman, feeble and helpless infancy have been subjected to outrages without parallel in the warfare of civilized nations.  With eager eyes they watch for your coming to their deliverance...."  Such effusive content continues.

  The broadside measures 11 by 8 and one half inches.  Folds, age toning and stains which could be improved by a paper restorer.  Issued by George Wm Bent and printed by John H Seals Power Press Print, Atlanta Georgia. 
 

(Sold)
Email to a friend

1883 Great ALS-Charles Todd Quintard-Chaplain-First Tn Regiment
Item #: NEW-0012343

Click image to enlarge
Three plus page letter all in hand of Charles Todd Quintard, Chaplain of the First Tennessee Regiment on the letterhead of The General Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church, House of Bishops, dated October 5the 1883 from Philadelphia Pa.  Address to "General” Wheless, formerly of the First Tennessee Regiment.  Cover is present but has been defaced by someone cutting the stamp off.  

My Dear General,  

It is to me a matter of profound regret that I am unable to attend the Re-Union of the First Tennessee Regiment on the 8th October.  If there were only the ordinary duties connected with a meeting of the House of Bishops, I might be tempted to steal away for a few days-but the gravest questions are to be considered in which I & the Episcopal Church in Tennessee are very deeply interested.  I want to ask you therefore, to convey to all who come to the meeting my most cordial salutations.  I have so many ? Memories connected to the First Tennessee Regiment from those days when we were dreaming of all the pomp and circumstances of war at Camp Cheatham-to the sad realities of Perryville and Chickamauga & Franklin  ? and other fields of blood that my heart clings to the glorious First with the liveliest emotions & with the sincerest friendships- "The boys.”  Thanks God, have always been true to the high principles, which they espoused, when they first enlisted-& as I think it all over.  I am free to say that under similar circumstances I would walk over the same path, though it is marked with blood-I willingly accept what seems ?defeat knowing that in God’s good providence-though our sweat was as blood-we are being purified to a higher, to a better & a truer civilization.  I beg you to salute each member of the Regiment and implore them that I count my intercourse with them, always the happiest of my life and that my prayers go up for each and all of them.

I trust that arrangements will be made to preserve the records of the Regiment.  I am yours very truly

Charles Todd Quintard, Chaplain of the First Tennessee Regiment.

See a war time view of Quintard under Images-Confederate and his book under CW Tennessee Books


Charles Todd Quintard was the second bishop of Episcopal Diocese of Tennessee and the first Vice-Chancellor of the University of the South at Sewanee. He was born in Connecticut, studied medicine at the University Medical College New York University and Bellevue Hospital, and moved to Memphis to teach physiology and pathological anatomy at Memphis Medical College. Under the influence of Bishop James Hervey Otey, Quintard studied for holy orders and entered the priesthood in the 1850's. During the Civil War he was a chaplain and a surgeon in the Confederate Army of Tennessee. He is the author of a highly sought Tennessee Civil War Regimental History-



(Sold)
Email to a friend

Manassas Letter-Samuel J C Moore-Officer-Stonewall Brigade
Item #: NEW-0012317W

Click image to enlarge
Paypal will not be accepted on this item though payment plans can be arranged.
 
Four page letter written on July 27, 1861 by a soldier of the 2nd Virginia Infantry, more famously known as the Stonewall Brigade to his wife.  The letter is quite legible and in good condition. I have show the front and last page in the scans.

I have selected the most interesting content to give in this listing though a complete transcript was made and will be sent to the buyer. 

The letter is written a few days after the Battle of Manassas I, otherwise known as the Battle of Bull Run, which was a victory for the Confederate forces.

"Never was a poor country so completely stripped of everything as this is-no stores-no houses of entertainment-houses all deserted of their inhabitants and occupied by troops, very many since the battle, as hospitals for the wounded of both-our own and the Federal armies-fences destroyed-fields laid waste-crops such as they had, very poor at best, destroyed and trampled in all there present but a portion of the dreaded effects of war.”

The enemy, with less humanity than ordinarily is found with savage tribes, ran away from the battlefield on Sunday last, leaving many of their wounded and the dead upon the ground, to whom they have since paid no attention.  Their wounded have been gathered up by our men, and are cared for like our own-our soldiers too buried many of their killed until their bodies became so offensive as to sicken all who approached them, since which they have left them alone, and many bodies now lie on the field where they fell, a sad spectacle of mortality.  It is usual to send a flag of truce to the battlefield after a fight is over, for the purpose of taking care of the wounded and the bodies of the dead.  But the Yankees, either from excessive fright or from wont of regard for the fallen, have failed to conform to this custom-hence this state of affairs of which I have spoken.”

"The whole condition of affairs has completely changed since we came here-at first no man dared to put his nose outside of our lines, for fear of being shot or captured by the federal pickets-now our men can roam at large over the country, without the danger of meeting a yankee, unless it be a dead corpse in the fence corner  or a half starved refugee begging for quarter or a mouthful to ear-these last they take prisoner and send them to Richmond to swell the trophies of our glorious victory.”

"You can form no idea of the terrific grandeur of the affair of Sunday last-cannons booming, muskets rattling, shells bursting around us in every direction-troops marching, and at last gallant bayonet charges from our brave Southern troops, all tended to excite and stir up our men to brave deeds.  Our regiment for nearly, if not quite 3 hours, stood under a raging fire of shots & shells without a falter, animated by the promise that at the proper time they should fire upon the enemy & follow this to be done, instead of ordering us to fire and advance, the Col gave the order to fall back.”

"I regret to say that Col Allen ( Colonel James Walkinson Allen-killed at Gaines Mill) did not display courage or self possession on  the battlefield, whether he professes these qualities or not and also that in his official report of the battle, which I have read, he does, to my certain knowledge, make an erroneous statement to screen himself from censure for his course on the field.  These facts, of course, destroy all confidence in him, with every true man in his Regiment who knows them, and there is consequently great disaffection in the Regiment, amounting almost to disorganization.  I doubt not too, that many trifling men among us, who are not attracted by principle in the war, are taking advantage of the present state of affiars hoping to get out of service entirely-so that altogether we are in an indifferent state-what will be the result of this I know not, but it may end in my throwing up my commission and shouldering a musket as a private in the ranks of some other regiment.  After regimenitials on Sunday, I went into the battle with another Regiment, the 18th Virginia Regiment and flatter myself I did some pretty good fighting-but I was among strangers, and had I shown the courage of Julius Caesar, I would not have advanced the object I had in view; my intention has always been at the first battle; if I found I could stand it, to endeavor to do something which would give me an honorable mention of my name in the Colonel’s official report, so that I could make it the basis of an application for a commission in the Confederate States Army.  Circumstances, which I have related, prevented this and although I have proof from several individuals that I did not play the coward in the fight, yet I am no nearer my commission that I was before….”

"I hope it may not be long before I get to see you again,  The enemy were so completely routed on Sunday that we now have no fears of an attack from them, and our troops are everyday drawing their lines nearer & nearer to Alexandria, without molestation.  Soon will come the storming of Arlington Heights and then I think we will pause unless Maryland joins us, when we will whip the Yankees from her border.  Some part of our army I think will be forced to the valley to drive the enemy from there…..Yours fondly, Samuel J C Moore.    

Moore got his wish and served with another unit with Jubal Early, serving as his adjutant general, whom he did not approve of due to his use of profanity.  

The majority of Moore’s letters are housed with the University of North Carolina. Post war Moore was a lawyer and planter of Berryville, Clarke County Virginia. 


(Sold)
Email to a friend

Celluloid Tar Heel-UCV 1907 Richmond Reunion-North Carolina
Item #: NEW-0012271

Click image to enlarge
This is one of my favorite UCV Reunion items.  Roll of Honor for the State of North Carolina which furnished 127,000 soldiers for the Confederacy.  This celluloid item measures four and a half inches long.  Some celluloid scratches, including one long one. Still looks great.

(Sold)
Email to a friend

Studio Card-Partisan Ranger John Mosby
Item #: NEW-0012255

Click image to enlarge
Here's one for the Gray Ghost fans.  This studio card was made by an unknown photographer probably in the late 1800's.  It was not made from the original negative although the clarity is very sharp.  Measures 8 by 5 and a half inches. Slightly bowed with some wear to the corners of the board with one missing tip and one small crease.  Back of the board shows the age of this great photograph. Never seen this one before in this large format.  No paypal on this image.

(Sold)
Email to a friend

1916-ALS-Confederate General Felix H Robertson
Item #: NEW-0012194

Click image to enlarge
This is a four page letter written by Felix Robertson from Crawford Texas, addressed to the wife of a former Confederate James Koger.  She had written inquiring as to whether or not he was related to the famous Tennessee family of the same name.  His response is negative and he presents some of his geneological information including how his father named him after one of his heroes General Felix Huston.  His own father led a command of men from Kentucky to join the Texas Revolution and was very active in the War between the States as well.  The rest of the letter is more detailed information about his family.   

I have shown only two pages of the letter.  Note the stain on the first page.  

General Robertson had a controversial career and when he died he was the last Confederate General.  He was quite active in Confederate reunions over the years.

(Sold)
Email to a friend

Studio Card-Partisan Ranger-John Mosby
Item #: NEW-0012120

Click image to enlarge
No paypal on this item, though payment plans can be arranged. 

Here's one for the Gray Ghost fans.  This studio card was made by an unknown photographer probably in the late 1800's.  It was not made from the original negative although the clarity is very sharp.  Measures 8 by 5 and a half inches. Slightly bowed with some wear to the corners of the board with one missing tip and one small crease.  Back of the board shows the age of this great photograph. Never seen this one before in this large format.

(Sold)
Email to a friend

Confederate General Zollicoffer Free Frank War Time Cover
Item #: NEW-0012112

Click image to enlarge
Paypal will not be accepted on this item though payment plays can be arranged.

This listing includes a manuscript Confederate document accepting the resignation of 2nd Lt. E D Hicks of the 1st Bat Tennessee Cavalry, Company A  Hicks was Zollicoffer's nephew by marriage.  Special Order No 184, dated Oct 19th 1861.  Hicks served briefly as Zollicoffer's adjutant general.  It was sent in a badly stained cover and note the same stains on some portions of the letter.  I am a little confused about the postal markings.  I'm wondering why the "paid 5" was required when signed by Zollicoffer.  I have verified with a noted autograph dealer that this is indeed Zollicoffer's signature.  Zollicoffer was killed very early in the war so I'm sure his signature must be fairly rare during war time. See scans to view the condition of these items.  

(Sold)
Email to a friend

ALS-UCV Letterhead-Confederate General Felix H Robertson
Item #: NEW-0012101

Click image to enlarge
This lettersheet of General Felix H Robertson, "Formerly Chief of Staff to Gen. Joe Wheeler, Confederate Army of Tennessee" is dated Dec 24, 192? and was written from Waco Texas.  The letter is addressed to Col James Koger of Paduch Ky, a former Confederate.  Robertson is thinking him for his Christmas card and mentions some family connections that they share.  

Felix Huston Robertson had a checkered career as a Confederate General. In 1864 a group of guerrillas associated with Robertson's troops slaughtered more than one hundred black Union soldiers who  had been wounded in battle and were defenseless. One of his officers, Champ Ferguson was hung after the war for his part in what later became known as the "Saltville Massacre."  The noted historian, William C Davis reported in a book that Robertson had participated in the massacre, though he was not prosecuted.  Robertson was severely wounded in a skirmish along Buckhead Creek in Georgia and never was able to return to duty. He retired to Texas as a lawyer and at the time of his death he was the last surviving Confederate general officer.

(Sold)
Email to a friend

Civil War Recruiting Broadside-Westbrook-Portland Maine
Item #: NEW-0012052

Click image to enlarge
No paypal on this item but payment plans can be arranged. 

This great broadside measures 23 by 19 inches.  It is in poor condition but the content trumps the condition.  First to address the condition, 1. numerous folds, 2. creases and crumpling, 3. holes, tears and separations, and 4. stains.  A previous owner has inserted by hand pencil notations filling in three words that were missing. The item has been encapsulated to protect it from further damage.  This can be easily removed, if desired.    

Here is the content:

ALL HANDS ON DECK

The time has arrived when every one is called upon to DO something in the work of 

WHIPPINGS THE REBELS!

THERE IS but a single choice left to us, 
WHIP! OR BE WHIPPED!

And we must decide quickly or we may be too late to make a choice.  Private business must be sacrificed and only the public good considered until the crisis is passed.

The Union cause Victorious and ALL IS SAVED ! Defeated all is Lost 

Every man of Westbook from 18 to 75 years, are called upon to meet at the TOWN HOUSE, WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON, To consider how we may best ACT to help our Government in this great struggle for national life and salvation.

The old must pay, the young FIGHT

August 24th 1862.  Address at bottom is Portland.


(Sold)
Email to a friend

Sixth Plate Cased-Armed Soldier.
Item #: NEW-0012049

Click image to enlarge
No paypal on this item though payment plans can be arranged. I purchased this interesting image in an antique mall in 1998.  The only information that the manager could give me is that it was found in a family estate in Franklin Tennessee.  This rugged looking guy is dressed in the interesting Confederate way.  His kepi has a white band and a large six point star on it.  The top button surrounded by a cockade like decoration was not gilded and it looks like it might be a star as well.  He is holding a sword.  There is some wear to the ambrotype including some scratches which hopefully can be in the scan.  I will send a high resolution scan upon request. The circular area just near his hand is a defect in the ambrotype.  The case is not the original case but is a nice leather one. The spine needs to be repaired as the old repair has not held up.  The clasps are there but I can't seem to work them.

Note: Recent feedback from other Civil War specialists have suggested that this may be a Union Missouri soldier.  Research is on-going.

(Sold)
Email to a friend

Sheet Music UCV March-Robert E Lee-Nathan Bedford Forrest
Item #: NEW-0012039

Click image to enlarge
This is the nicest example of this great sheet which I have seen as most are in very poor condition.  This sheet, however, also has some condition problems. multiple right edge tears, Long tear that goes into the medallion just under the sword.  Someone in the past has taped the whole left side in the border.  The tape is not archival tape.  Some other general wear plus ink signature of a previous owner.  On the plus side the colors are very strong, not faded at all. The sheet is complete.   

(Sold)
Email to a friend

CDV Lot-Lt Col-Gustavus A Bull-KIA-Seven Pines-35th Georgia
Item #: NEW-0011894

Click image to enlarge
This lot consists of three CDV's of Confederate Lt. Col Gustavus Bull of LaGrange Georgia who was killed at Seven Pines.  One CDV show Bull in his uniform in a studio pose.  No back mark but was found in an estate containing images by J M Tomlinson of Le Grange.  Note that the CDV has been trimmed at the top.  Period ID of Bull at the bottom and a stain on the bottom right corner.  The second CDV is also of Bull in uniform.  The little scattered white spots are a defect in the photo.  Finally, there is a third CDV with a back mark of photographer Tomlinson.  I think this may be a photograph of a painting of Bull, probably made by the family after his death. This CDV has been unevenly trimmed at the bottom. Note there is a cast in Bull's eye in the first two images. The following information was taken from the book History of the Doles-Cook Brigade and was available on the web at the following link http://people.virginia.edu/~mmd5f/humane.html 

Lieutenant Colonel Gustavus A. Bull was mustered into service as junior second Lieutenant in the LaGrange Light Guards, Company B, Fourth Georgia Regiment,April 26, 1861. Resigned and was promoted lieutenant-colonel of theThirty-fifth Georgia, October 15, 1861. He was born in LaGrange, Ga., 1835, entered Franklin College and was graduated with the first honor in 1854. After teaching school for several years, read law, and located in Newnan, Ga. He soon won a high reputation in his chosen profession, and in 1860 was one of the Breckinridge electors. Senator B.H. Hill pronounced him the most promising young man in the South. He was a strict disciplinarian, but always courteous and kind to his men and thoughtful to their comfort. On the 31st of May, 1862, on the battle-field of Seven Pines, this bright star went down in blood. Early in the engagement General Pettigrew was badly wounded and the command of the brigade devolved upon Colonel E.L. Thomas. Lieutenant-Colonel Bull then assumed command of his regiment and led it in a desperate charge upon a battery which was pouring upon them a murderous fire of grape and cannister. The column halted and began to waver, when, riding in front of it, Colonel Bull gave the command, "forward," and appealed to the men to follow him. At that moment he fell mortally wounded .He died the following day and was buried by the enemy and fills an unknown grave. The whole regiment admired and loved him. One of the members expressed the sentiments of all when he wrote to Colonel Bull's father: "The crushed and broken hearts that mourn the loss of the hero of the Thirty-fifth Georgia are not confined to your family circle." General Pettigrew, commanding the brigade, said: "If there was a better officer in the army than Colonel Bull, and one to whom the prospect of distinction in any department of life was brighter, I did not know him. He was indeed a  loss to his country." The soil of the Old Dominion will forever be sacred because in it rests in their bloody gray so many of the hero martyrs of the South. As long as the South is trod by men worthy to be free, all honor will be accorded her sons of the sixties, and heroism and devotion will be an example and inspiration for all time to come."


(Sold)
Email to a friend

Clipped Signature-Confederate-John S Mosby
Item #: NEW-0011637

Click image to enlarge
Nice example of a John Mosby autograph that I have on consignment.  Looks like it may have been cut from a scrapbook as the paper is similar.   Mosby signed this about five years before his death.  Mosby was known as the Gray Ghost and was a cavalry battalion commander of the 43rd Battalion, 1st Virginia Cavalry, known as Mosby's Rangers.  He was known for his quick raids on the Union Army and an uncanny ability to elude his would be captors.  



(Sold)
Email to a friend

Sixth Plate Ambrotype-Southern Militia Man-What A Hat!
Item #: NEW-0011527

Click image to enlarge
This is one of the most interesting images I have picked up over the years. As can be seen in the scan, it has great content and great clarity.  I was told that it was found in a family estate in the 1970's in Bamberg South Carolina.  The person I purchased it from had some hunches about the outfit he might have been with but I have been unable to verify it with my internet research.  It was purchased with the sixth plate ambrotype of what is thought to have been the wife.  The image has been tinted and unfortunately gilded.  I have never seen a shako with such a long plume.  He is wearing leather gloves which indicates he was with the cavalry or mounted infantry. When I purchased this image it was in a thermoplastic case and I replaced it with a leather case (mended spine) since I think it is unwise to combine ambrotypes with hard cases. If anyone has any thoughts about the uniform I would be interested.   Paypal will not be accepted on this item though payment plans will be accepted.  

(Sold)
Email to a friend

Rare 1910 Staff UCV Ribbon-Mobile Alabama-General George Harrison
Item #: NEW-0011447

Click image to enlarge
No paypal on this item though payment plans are welcome.  This magnificent ribbon was found in General George Harrison's estate. At the time of this reunion Harrison was in his staff, thus the ribbon is headed Department Staff, George W Gordon Lieutenant General Commanding the Army of Tennessee. The ribbon measures eight and a half inches long.  Celluloid bar has a few small brown spots.


(Sold)
Email to a friend

Rare CDV-Bishop Charles Todd Quintard-Army of Tennessee-Giers
Item #: NEW-0011381

Click image to enlarge
Paypal will not be accepted on this item, though payment plans are available. This is the second example that I have had of this rare pose of Bishop Quintard, recently found in a Tennessee estate. Charles Todd Quintard was the second bishop of Episcopal Diocese of Tennessee and the first Vice-Chancellor of the University of the South at Sewanee. He was born in Connecticut, studied medicine at the University Medical College New York University and Bellevue Hospital, and moved to Memphis to teach physiology and pathological anatomy at Memphis Medical College. Under the influence of Bishop James Hervey Otey, Quintard studied for holy orders and entered the priesthood in the 1850's. During the Civil War he was a chaplain and a surgeon in the Confederate Army of Tennessee. He was the author of a scarce Tennessee regimental history, currently on my site. The CDV is quite clean with the front and backmark of C C Giers, famous Civil War photographer from Nashville.  

This item was sold on eBay for 442.09  Consignment Faye

(Sold)
Email to a friend

Commander-Badge-Ribbon-UCV-1913 Reunion-Chattanooga
Item #: NEW-0011377

Click image to enlarge
This item came out of General George Harrison's estate who was the Commander of the Army of Tennessee.  The gilt is so fresh it looks like it was made yesterday.  The white ribbon shows the most wear.  I can't tell if it is slightly dingy or is just creme colored.  Engraved on the top bar is "Commander".  No pay pal on this item but payment plans can be arranged.

(Sold)
Email to a friend

Post War ALS-Confederate General-Thomas Benton Smith
Item #: NEW-0011354

Click image to enlarge
This two page letter, front to back is on a small lettersheet. Edge separations at the folds. Please keep in mind as you read the letter, that it reflects his mental confusion due to the devestating head injuries that he received at the Battle of Nashville, attacked by a Union Officer while he was attempting to surrender. The following is the transcript.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       March 25, 190?

Miss Nellie Grant Sartoris (General U S Grant's daughter)

The time has come for you and I put our heads together and move Roosevelt (Teddy) and Negro equality out of the White House. (undoubtedly referring to Teddy Roosevelt inviting Booker T Washington to dine with him in the White House).  When you married Sartoris General U S Grant and I fought four years to keep the negroes in slavery.

General Washington owned 100 Negro slaves and Jeff Davis owed some 350. 1862 When the Confederate States constitution was adopted.

Archbishop ? can be court martialed or shot for advocating the marriage of negroes and whites the daughters of the Confederated States have issued...  Most of the rest is too difficult to read  so I'll just note what I could read "the armies of the North & South the Catholic church so fallen? Is rotten the only negroes that are ?are those who have left the United States year 1865 the Catholics must force the United States to go to Africa when they co marry negroes and ? the race  we don't wish the legal mixtures under our flag. 

Signed by Tom Benton Smith
President

F D Grant (Grant's son)
Vice President

Note: This note was written while General Smith was in the "insane” asylum” in Nashville Tennessee.

 Smith was born in Mechanicsville Tennessee in 1838. A bright young man with a gift of mechanical inventiveness, he received a patent for a locomotive pilot at the age of 15. He enrolled in the Nashville Military Academy (Western Military Institute) He was working for the Nashville & Decatur Railroad when the war broke out. He gave up that job to help raise a company of volunteers in and around Triune. That company merged with a group raised by Joel A Battle and eventually became Company B of the 20th Tennessee Infantry.  Saw combat action in the Battle of Mill Springs and Shiloh. Later promoted to Colonel at the age of 22. Wounded seriously in the Battle of Murfreesboro-Stones River and was out of action for much of 1863. He resumed field duties and led his troops at Baton Rouge, Hoover's Gap & Chickamauga when he was again wounded. He was promoted to Brigadier General on July 29,1864 becoming the youngest General in the Army of Tennessee. At the battle of Franklin, his staff officer Tod Carter was killed within sight of his home and Smith informed the parents and searched the battlefield for his body. During the battle of Nashville, Smith surrendered and was captured by Union Colonel William L McMillan who beat Smith about the head with Smith's own sword, leaving his brain exposed and in a comma. Smith was not expected to live but recovered only to become a prisoner at Fort Warren. Released July 24th, 1865. Smith did some railroad work after the Civil War and ran for a seat in the U S Congress in 1870, but lost. Struggling with the permanent damage he suffered to his brain, Smith spent his last 47 years in an insane asylum in Nashville, appearing occasionally at UCV reunions.

(Sold)
Email to a friend

1904 UCV Ribbon-Nashville Reunion-North Carolina Tar Heels
Item #: NEW-0011325

Click image to enlarge
Silk ribbon which measures about seven inches long. Some wear to the ribbon with the biggest being a fly away area at the bottom right hand side.  There are a few other separations and weaknesses. The color is nice and the ribbon presents well.  Please view the scans.

(Sold)
Email to a friend

1916-UCV Reunion Badge-Ribbon-Adjutant General-Chief of Staff-Army of Tn
Item #: NEW-0011320

Click image to enlarge
Magnificent badge which belonged  General George P Harrison and purchased by me many years ago. George Harrison is listed in " More Generals in Gray". Two Celluloid Bars reading Army of Tenn-Adjutant General & Chief of Staff. The drop is pristine but both ribbons are stained.  The white ribbon is dingy in appearance.. The whole badge measures nine inches.  The reunion was held in 1916.  The Adjutant General for this reunion  was Bennent Young.  George P Harrison succeeded Young in 1917 which accounts for him being allowed to wear this badge in the 1916 reunion.


(Sold)
Email to a friend

1916 Ribbon-Badge-Birmingham UCV Reunion-Adjutant General
Item #: NEW-0011276

Click image to enlarge
This item was included in a lot of reunion items from General Richard Harrison's and his brother, General George P Harrison's estate that I purchased many years ago. Both Harrisons are listed in " More Generals in Gray". Two Celluloid Bars reading Army of Tenn-Adjutant General & Chief of Staff.  Some small dots on the celluloid.  The drop is pristine but the ribbons has some light stains. The whole badge measures a little less than five inches.  The reunion was held in 1916.  The Adjutant General for this reunion  was Bennent Young.  George P Harrison succeeded Young in 1917 which accounts for him being allowed to wear this badge in the 1916 reunion.

(Sold)
Email to a friend

CDV-Andelia Bull-Nancy Harts Member- LaGrange Georgia
Item #: NEW-0011209

Click image to enlarge
This CDV of Andelia Bull was found in a La Grange Georgia family estate. I was able to identify this image through David Wiggins's great book, Georgia's Confederate Sons, Vol. 1, Page 118 which shows some of the members of the Nancy Harts an all female militia group. There is much on the web about this famous group from La Grange. There is a back mark Of J M Tomlinson, photographer  La Grange.  Andelia Bull was the sister of Lt. Col Augustus Bull of the 35th Ga, who died from wounds received in battle.

Even though General Robert E Lee had surrendered on April 12, 1865, 13,000 troops under General James Wilson were still striking at targets in Alabama and Georgia.  Fresh from victory over General Forrest at Selma Alabama, part of Wilson's force entered LaGrange, Georgia, a town they believed to be virtually defenseless.  But upon entering the city, the column was stopped by a roadblock of some 40 women armed with rifles and muskets.  This group of women had decided earlier that since most of the men in the town were off fighting that they were defenseless.  They decided to protect themselves by forming a military company of women.  Forty women met to organize at an old schoolhouse.  Nancy Morgan was elected captain; Andelia Bull, Mary Heard and Aley Smith Lieutenants; Augusta Hill and M E Colquitt Sergeants Sally Bull, Leila Pullen and Caroline Poythress Corporals, and Ella Key Treasurer. The company named itself the Nancy Harts after the Revolutionary War heroine who single-handedly defended her home against a group of invading British soldiers by shooting one and holding the rest hostage until help arrived.

The little militia company met twice a week for drills and target practice with the left over guns and old flintlocks.  Most had a habit of closing their eyes before they shot, often missing targets completely.  One bull even got in the way of one of the errant shots.  With time however, they improved in their marksmanship and even excelled in their marching by frequent drills through the town's streets to the beat of a tattered drum.

After the fall of West Point Ga the federals moved on to LaGrange.  The Nancy Harts assembled and formed a line to confront the marching union force.  The women where shocked to see that at the front of the column there were many Confederate prisoners.  They could not fire without endangering their loved ones.  The Federal Colonel, coincidentally named Oscar H LaGrange addressed the brave women and told them that no homes or peaceful citizens would be harmed if they would disarm.  Despite this promise many of the local homes and businesses were looted and they torched the local tannery, cotton warehouses, the train depot and other buildings around the town square.  The Harts' homes were spared and the Nancy Harts had prevailed to some degree in their only confrontation.


(Sold)
Email to a friend

Beautiful Celluloid with Bar-1910 Mobile Alabama UCV Reunion-General George Harrison
Item #: NEW-0011208

Click image to enlarge
One and a half inch celluloid attached by a celluloid bar showing Robert E Lee and Ralph Semnes.  Great eye appeal but under 10X magnification you can view clear spotting along the edges of the button. This item was purchased in a lot I bought over twenty years ago from the estate of General (More Generals In Gray) Richard or George Harrison.

(Sold)
Email to a friend

1887 Stunning Color Lithographed Item-New Orleans Army of Tennessee
Item #: NEW-0011194

Click image to enlarge
I was told that this was a place mat for a dinner held by the Association of the Army of Tennessee Veterans celebrating their 10th Anniversary held in New Orleans on April 6th & 7th in 1887.There are a couple of diagonal  creases that are pretty much lost in all the graphics.  There are three folds which unfortunately has been reinforced with scotch tape on the back.  To date there has been no bleed through as the paper is rather thick.  The tape could possibly be removed but I haven't tried.  Measures thirteen by eight and a half inches.  Litho was done by G Koeckert in New Orleans.

(Sold)
Email to a friend

1905 Postal Card-Reminder of UCV Meeting-N B Forrest Camp
Item #: NEW-0011081

Click image to enlarge
Neat card from the hand of L T Dickinson who was the adjutant of the Nathan Bedford Forrest UCV Camp in Chattanooga Tennessee. Good condition with the exception to a small tip crease. This particular card features Teddy Roosevelt petting a bear and a vet in the background.

This is one of the unique cards which was issued between the years of 1886-1923.  This card was sent as a monthly meeting reminder for the Nathan Bedford Forrest chapter
of the United Confederate Veteran in Chattanooga Tennessee. The President L T Dickinson embellished the cards with his point of view on national  
issues, international and political issues, local, state, and Federal. His pen and ink drawings were reproduced in mimeographs and are prized among Civil War collectors and
postcard collectors.


(Sold)
Email to a friend

Sixth Plate Tintype-Union Soldier-Hand Colored Flag
Item #: NEW-0011026

Click image to enlarge
Very good condition on this image of a union soldier prominently displaying the flag.  Encased in patriotic thermoplastic case.  Chips out of one corner and an accompanying crack, Otherwise in nice condition.  

(Sold)
Email to a friend

Gen John B Gordon-CSA-Brady-Signed
Item #: NEW-0010983

Click image to enlarge
This photograph measures 8 and a half by 4 inches.  Signed at the bottom by Gordon.  Though unmarked, I was told and believe it to be by Brady.  Exceptional clarity and great condition, other than an indentation line just above his right shoulder.  I don't know what caused the white line running across his coat under his shoulder but it is in the photograph, not on it.  I bought this over twenty years ago in Nashville from a dealer handling a great Civil War Collection.  I passed on a war time signed General Nathan Bedford Forrest document-things like that you never forget. No paypal on this item but payment plans can be arranged. 

(Sold)
Email to a friend

Confederate Letter-Bombing of Ft Sumter-18th Ga Infantry
Item #: NEW-0010919

Click image to enlarge
Three pages on small note paper with folds, some stains and over all wear. The scanner cut off a little on the left hand side. The writer is Henry A Snider of the 18th Battalion, Georgia Infantry.  The Eighteenth was also known as the Savannah Volunteer Guards which was stationed on the islands off the coast of Charleston and distinguished itself at Battery Wagner.

Battery Marion
Sullivan Island
May 2nd 1864

Dear Albert

Your kind letter of April 25th instant came to hand on friday last.  I should have answered it before now, but we have (been) so busy in preparing for muster on the last of the month that I really have not had the opportunity of doing so.  But just as you say better late than never,.  I am glad to hear of your good health and all the family as these few lines leave me enjoying the same.  We have had beautiful weather here lately.   The water will soon be warm enough to go in swimming here in fact some of the boys are pitching in already.  We have first rate times here in catching fish & crabs but the provisions we get from government I cannot speak so favorably.  sometimes for a week perhaps we would not get a grain of meal, nothing but meal rice & corn bread sometimes maybe a little wheat flour.  If it were not for the little snacks we get from home now & then I don't know what we do for it is certainly a great accommodation to the men in the Battallion.  There is no news I believe worthy of not to write you this time with the exception that the Yankees are as busy as ever on Morris Island in building additional fortification and planting more guns and mortard.  About threea weeks ago they had but three mortars on that Island.  But today there is no less than twenty bearing on this island and Fort Sumpter.  You can judge what a grand sight it is to behold to hear twenty mortars fired as quick as they can be touched off and in about 7 or 10 seconds afterwards see the same number of shells explode about fifty or hundred feet in the air right over old Fort Sumpter.  One our men was in Charleston yesterday on a visit to the city and while there some of the Yankee prisoners taken at Plymouth were passing through the city to the railroad depot on their way to Americus Ga.  He says that while they were marching through the streets that the Ladies of Charleston presented them with flowers & beautiful bouquets.  and gave the nice eatables while they stopped there, a rather mysterious affair this I think.  What do you think about it?  The Confederates are busy building additional work on this Island, they are building a mortar battery almost right in front of our shanty door.  I expected to be in Savannah on furlough long before this and perhaps I would but for the furloughs were so suddenly and unexpectedly stopped that I have lost the chance at present until they are resumed again.  I expect they may commence giving furloughs again before long.  I hope and I know that I am in for one then certain.  Closing remarks.  Signed Henry A Snider.


(Sold)
Email to a friend

Short History-General Robert E Lee
Item #: NEW-0010855

Click image to enlarge
Pristine example of one of the little inserts from Duke's cigarettes. This company put out a series of little biographies of all the Civil War Generals and it is a challenge to get a complete set. Illustrated in beautiful color lithography and contains an example of his autograph and a short biography of General Lee. Measures two and 3/4 inches by one and a half inch.

(Sold)
Email to a friend

Sixth Plate Tintype-Union Soldier All Geared Up
Item #: NEW-0010832

Click image to enlarge
Nice clarity on this tintype of a Union soldier armed with a rifle and pistol and equipped with a cartridge box and cap box.  With a magnifying glass you can read the letter U S and some of the details on the breast plate.  Tinted cheeks and pants in a studio scene.  There is a rub to the left of the hand holding the rifle and extending to the edge. There is also a very slight bend which you can see only when you rotate it under a light. You can't see this face on, only when turning the image.  Half case only.  The second scan reflects the image better than the first one which makes it look darker than it is. 

(Sold)
Email to a friend

Confederate Homemade Fighting Knife
Item #: NEW-0010814

Click image to enlarge
Great look to this knife which came out of a Virginia estate along with a double armed Confederate soldier now on my site and a Confederate holster, also on the site.  I took this knife to the Dalton show where a knife dealer appraised it between $600 and $800.  He said it was a homemade knife probably made by a black smith.  It measures fourteen and a quarter inches long.  Please view the scan to see the condition. 

(Sold)
Email to a friend

Additional Pages
[Previous Page]  1  2  3   4   5  [Next Page]
Catalog Updated
10/30/2020 11:39:00 AM
Andrew Jackson Litho-A Grand Functionary-Clay

$2,000.00

Copyright © 2020 TennRebGirl.com All rights reserved.
Powered by Web-Cat Copyright © 1996-2020 GrayCat Systems