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Civil War
Georgia's Confederate Sons-Vol I-Wiggins
Item #: NEW-0017257

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This is a soft bound book which is in demand. I have priced it lower than the few I found on the web. Assembled by David Wiggins, the book has 176 pages mostly photos of Georgia Confederate soldiers. Some minor wear.

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POW Letter-Johnson's Island-1st Lt. 8th La Inf
Item #: NEW-0017140

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This is the best POW letter I have ever had.  It is written on one page as required and addressed to John B Lindsey, Esquire in Frankfort Kentucky. It is dated June 8, 1865. April 9th was the date that Robert E Lee surrendered so the war was clearly at end.  The letter as written by Robert S Perry.1st Lt 8th Louisiana Infantry. Perry was struggling with his future as to whether or not he should sign the Loyalty Oath to the US 

 Dear Johnnie, Yours May 2nd answered 14th same month.  Enclosed is a likeness of myself.  I then, answered, as near as I could your questions as to my instructions for the future.  Since that time grave events vitally affecting that future have happened, and today I find myself without a government, nay without a country, for I shall not indulge in hypocritical ?.  The Confederacy has ceased to exist and I presume I must now submit to an inevitable conclusion, and ask for amnesty.  In this matter I think I have gone as far as honor and duty expected of me.  I now regard myself as at liberty, if I choose, to give my allegiance to the U.S.

     As to the moral propriety of my doing so I have no doubt.  The sacrifice of political principle involved is such as has been made, without crime by some peoples, at different stages the the world’s great history, as such a sacrifice as thousands of republicans living under monarchies and taking oaths to support them & vice versa.  Were I not convinced of the morality of the course I should remain here a long time yet.  There is a question of duress.  But for that I am not responsible nor do I have any ? upon it.  

This being my conclusion, I desire you to get my release at once, and by any means in your power.  But very few are being liberated, and those only upon representations specially made by funds at Washington.  You will be able, without difficulty, to learn how to proceed in the processes.  I hope you will write me at once on this subject and that you will not allow the grass to grow under your feet.  I remain your friend Robert S Perry. 1st Lt.  8th La Infantry.  

The photo shows Perry and a comrade.  He is the one on the right hand side.  I don't have the photo.

        

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Samuel Griswold- Civil War Receipt
Item #: NEW-0016599

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Here is a nice go with for someone who has a sword made by Samuel Griswold of Griswoldville Georgia.  It is a Confederate imprint dated 10-7-1861.  This receipt is for $112/50 for one saw ?.  Signed by Griswold's agent R. Johnson.  Writing on the back shows that the purchase was made by William Daniel.

Here is a wikipedia link to Griswold's history:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samuel_Griswold



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Camden Ark Confederate Veterans Parade Postcard
Item #: NEW-0016593

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Pristine card which was not mailed.  This gathering was for Decoration Day in Arkansas.  Clearly one of the most beautiful UCV cards made.  

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Virginia Secession Cockade
Item #: NEW-0016572

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This rare item is mounted on a velvet board.  It is not pasted down and the shank is sticking out the other side of the tiny button.  The velvet ribbon is somewhat worn as to be be expected.  The whole item measures about two and a quarter inches.  You don't get an opportunity to buy an authentic cockade ribbon very often. Paypal will not be accepted on this item though payment plans can be arranged.

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Seven Pines-Inscribed Stick From Battlefield
Item #: NEW-0016225

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This stick was purchased by me from a dealer who had sold me three Confederate images from a family member in Lithonia Georgia.  He found this stick and spent time cleaning it to find the ink writing which he deciphered to read "cut in the center of 7 pines battlefield where 1500 soldiers were killed May 31, 186- that fought by Lee & McClellan and field officer J E Lyne"  I can agree with some of the translation but not all. My research can not find a likely person by that name.   Better eyes and research may be able to do better.

The woman who sold the images was a direct descendant of only one of the soldiers, who was Elijah Lazarus Anderson.  She also had a powder flask belonging to him so I am guessing that this also belonged to him.  All three images have been sold. 

Note: I am relisting this item as someone has provided me information about the stick.

http://canequest.com/seven-pines-malvern-hill-battlefield-twig-canes-carved-by-captain-james-e-lyne/ 

and 

http://www.saverichmondbattlefields.org/pdf/v10_n1_2011_Winter.pdf  



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John Breckinridge-John Hunt Morgan Celluloid-Ribbon-1901 UCV
Item #: NEW-0016193

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Paypal will not be accepted on this item though payment plans may be arranged.

I consider this the most magnificent item in my United Confederate Veterans Reunion collection.  This item is from the Louisville Ky convention which was held in October 22-23 in  1901. Nice condition on this two and a quarter inch celluloid. With the ribbon, the total length is seven and a half inches.  The top of the ribbon is dingy or it may be ink.  There also is a small dark area of the ribbon on the left side of the ribbon just above the top of the button, which also may be ink.  Finally there is a slit separation on the right side of the ribbon at the bottom and two tiny spots on the right edge.  I'm listing all these small defects but they hardly detract from the overall impression   

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Macon Ga UCV Reunion-Colorful Poster
Item #: NEW-0016172

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This great display item measures 33 by 10 inches.  Despite heavy folds, this item looks great.  It was issued by the Cotton Belt Route to entice veterans and others to attend this United Confederate Veteran National Reunion which was held in Macon Georgia in 1912.  It will not be mailed in the frame but folded along the original folds for easy and economic mailing. 

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Triple Armed Confederate Soldier-Ninth Plate
Item #: NEW-0016121

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This is a ninth plate which packs a mighty wallop due to the pose which fills the whole frame.  It was found in Texas and really I think it probably is a Texan.  Note the color decorated hearts on the shirt which was probably home made by a Mother or wife.  Other areas are tinted pink as well.  This is a ruby ambrotype.  It was published in Military Images in the march/april 2008 issue.  There are two revolvers and a huge knife.  The thermoplastic case is also in very good condition.

No pay pal on this item though payment plans can be arranged.  

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Stonewall Song Book-Fifth Edition
Item #: NEW-0016110

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This is an incredibility rare songster.  It was printed in 1864 by West & Johnson in Richmond, Virginia.  It is small, measuring six by three and a half inches. The back end paper is missing but with 72 pages, it is complete and intact.  Stains and foxing, as can be seen in the scan. Reference, Parrish and Willingham
  
Paypal will not be accepted on this item, though payment plans can be arranged.

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UCV Reunion-Macon Ga-Gorgeous Envelope
Item #: NEW-0016083

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Legal sized envelope with beautiful graphics.  Confederate Veterans Reunion-1912.  They don't make them like this anymore.  Creasing on top right hand side and smaller one on bottom left corner.

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Here's Your Mule-Early War Nashville Imprint
Item #: NEW-0015983

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This is a rare camp song printed in 1862 by C D Benson in the District Court of Middle Tennessee.  This is not a Confederate imprint since Nashville was occupied by 1862.  Despite this, Nashville sheet music publishers continued to print pro Confederate sheet music.  This is an off shoot of a well known camp song which has several interpretations as to the meaning of the song.  This was believed to be removed from an unknown book as evidenced by part of the book stuck on the back.  Someone in the past tried to remove it by pulling at it, leaving some bad places in the rag paper.  The graphics are unique to the song and inspires much interpretation.  The song is supposed to be about a farmer who lost his horse but the fashionably dressed subject on this sheet is clearly not a farmer. I feel the man has a strong resemblance to Andrew Jackson, who faced the first threat to the Union in his administration with the South Carolina nullification issue.  Of course Andrew Jackson had died 16 years earlier and someone who knows more than me pointed out that it would be more likely Andrew Johnson even though he stated that folk art drawings are not reliable as to identifying subjects. The donkey kicking would represent the Democratic Party in my view.  Of note also is the overturned basket of eleven eggs.  Tennessee was the eleventh state to secede.  Anyway I believe this song was more complex than a farmer wandering around civil war camp sites looking for his mule.  The item measures 14 and a half by 9 inches.  The last chorus mentions John (Hunt) Morgan so this identifies the sheet as having Confederate leanings. Other sheets were published leaving the last Chorus off.  Thanks to Ashley McAnulty and Robert Curtis for their thoughts on this item.

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Gen Charles Dahlgren-Patriotic Cover Lot-Rare
Item #: NEW-0015897

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This is a lot of three Confederate patriotic covers, all three addressed and hand delivered to General Dahlgren of the 3rd Mississippi Brigade.  All of the backs are absent so the price has been adjusted accordingly. 

 The first cover is addressed to Genl C G Dahlgren with the rare and desirable graphic of Camp C G Dahlgren which was hand carried to him there.  This specific cover is not listed in Confederate States of America Catalog and Handbook by Kaufmann although similar graphic images are shown. 
 The second image shows a rare and desirable Our Flag sticker cover.  Seven stars.  It is on page 442 and is titled ST-1. This letter was hand delivered to the General in New Orleans "Care of Foley Avery?”

 The final cover is listed as FM-1 Page 437.  It is the Mississippi Confederate State Seal with "Mississippi" on top. This one was addressed to the General and hand carried to his headquarters at Natchez Mississippi.  

Please view the scans to see the additional wear, especially on the Our Flag cover.  

Here is information on General Dahlgren, who is listed in Generals in Gray. He evidently had a short career after being put in charge of the Mississippi State troops.  He led the Third Brigade which protected the Mississippi coast line and resigned after another General was put in charge of his troops by Davis.

ttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_G._Dahlgren

Charles Gustavus Ulrich Dahlgren (August 13, 1811 – December 18, 1888) was a Confederate brigadier general during the American Civil War. He commanded the 3rd Brigade, Army of Mississippi, before a dispute with the President of the Confederate States of America, Jefferson Davis, cost him his career.

Following Mississippi's passage of the ordinance of secession and the subsequent outbreak of the Civil War, Dahlgren raised two regiments of state-sponsored volunteer infantry (the 3rd and 7th Mississippi Infantry) by his own means. When his brigade was transferred from state service to the Provisional Army of the Confederate States, he lost his command. Dahlgren was known for a short temper and strong opinions, and strongly opposed this transfer. His outspoken opposition to the nationalization of his men cost him his command and sparked a feud with the family of Jefferson Davis.

ttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_G._Dahlgren 

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Unveiling of Confederate Monument-La Grange Ga Postcard
Item #: NEW-0015493

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Rare card from Lagrange Georgia.  Mailed with LaGrange cancel, I believe the year is 1907. Minor wear


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Confederate Soldier-Colt Dragoon Ambrotype
Item #: NEW-0015380

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This is a sixth plate ambrotype  featuring a soldier holding a 3rd generation Colt Dragoon pistol.  The image was found in Tazewell Virginia.  Some loss of the image on the bottom right hand corner and a little on the top right hand corner.

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Robert E Lee Signature-Washington College Report Card
Item #: NEW-0015335

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Paypal will not be accepted on this item, though payment plans can be arranged.

This is a report card for Hardy B Branner dated May 31, 1867.  At the time Robert E Lee was President of Washington College in Virginia, later to be known as Washington and Lee.  Hardy B Branner was the Mayor in Knoxville Tennessee.  Please view the scan to see the condition of the report card-rough left edge, folds and light staining on the folds except for the top and bottom which is more prominent. 

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Color-Confederate Sheet-Never Surrender Quick Step
Item #: NEW-0015201

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Beautiful Confederate imprint by Edward O Eaton and published by Blackmar in Augusta Ga in 1863.  Complete sheet.  See scan

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Confederates Grand March-1862 Sheet Music
Item #: NEW-0015200

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Complete Confederate imprint by Wm H Hartwell Augusta Ga.  Published by Blackmar.  4th Edition is meaningless.  Sheet music publishers made the sheet seem more popular by putting higher numbers on the Edition. Listed in Parrish & Willingham.  Color in the scan is not true.  It is light tan not gray.

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Presentation Box-Embossed Confederate Note-Memminger
Item #: NEW-0015132

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Paypal will not be accepted on this item though payment plans can be arranged.

This item is believed to possibly be an item presented to the first Confederate Secretary of Treasury, Christopher Gustavus Memminger.  The box is small measuring five by 3 and a half inches, possibly made to fit a small New Testament bible.  It is too small to fit most of the Confederate notes, which one would assume might have be made for that purpose.   

The box is wrapped in light tan leather and is constructed of a light sturdy wood.  There is some staining as can be seen in the scan.  There is a separation at the fold but the cover is not loose.  The box bears the impression "Confederate States of America  Richmond  December 2nd 1862” and followed by the embossed signature of Christopher Memminger, Secretary of Treasury” which is a match for most of the Confederate Bank Notes. Across the bottom is the bible verse Hebrews 11.1 "Now faith is the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen.”  The inside of the box is lined with the kind of paper seen in early Civil War books. 

The box was originally acquired in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia from a noted antique dealer between Staunton & Harrisonburg, Virginia.  

Extensive research might reveal that this box was presented to Memminger thanking him for the time of his service in the Confederate White House at Richmond.  If it did not belong to him, it is hard to imagine what other purpose such a box might have been created.  At any rate, it is clearly a one of the kind Confederate item made during the Civil War. The paper that came with the item shows a small box in the photograph.


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Nathan Bedford Forrest-Gadsden Al UCV Ribbon
Item #: NEW-0015123

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This item measures about six and a half inches long.  The celluloid drop measures almost 2 inches in diameter and has foxing.  See scan.  This reunion was held in Gadsden in 1922 and it was the 22nd Annual Reunion of the Alabama Division of the United Confederate Veterans.  The Delegate bar has come off a third of the pin due to fraying and there is a small tear at the bottom of the ribbon across from the year. These State Reunion souvenirs are more scarce than items from the National reunions.  

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Calling Card-Confederate Flag-Bradford Nicol-Cheatham Bivouac
Item #: NEW-0015118

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Neat calling card for Bradford Nicol.  Here is his history found on the web on a family site:

At the outbreak of the Civil War he joined Company A, 1st Tennessee Light Artillery (Rutledge Battery) as a Corporal. He was newly promoted to platoon sergeant when his platoon leader disappeared just before the Battle of Shiloh, leaving him in command. He so distinguished himself commanding the rear guard artillery of his division's (Bate's) withdrawal from Shiloh, that General Polk gave him a battlefield commission. When the battery's twelve month enlistment period ran out just after Shiloh, Bradford transferred to the Ordnance Corps. He subsequently took part in over thirty battles or engagements including Chickamauga, Atlanta, Nashville, Murfreesboro and Missionary Ridge. In none of these was he wounded or captured in spite of having two horses killed beneath him. He was commissioned a Major of Artillery in the Regular Army 3 April 1865, and was serving as Chief Ordnance Officer of Bate's Division near Bentonville, North Carolina, at war's end. 

Upon his return to Nashville after the war, he returned to school, and later opened the Bradford Nichol Furniture Company. This business was very successful and made him quite a wealthy man for a time until a general business depression in Nashville forced him to close its doors. Nichol had a distinguished career in Nashville and was Grand Master of the General Grand Council of the United States. He wrote a memoir of his service in the Civil War and was very active in Confederate veteran affairs, and a member of the Frank Cheatham Bivouac. Nichol died in 1913 having been struck by a street card while crossing the street. 

      


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Southern Recorder-Milledgeville Ga-1861 Confederate Paper
Item #: NEW-0015111

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This is a large format paper which measures 19 by 25 and a half inches and opens up.  It was published on 8/13/1861.  R M Orme & son were the editors.  Volume XLII.    Four pages of war content. There are proclamations by Governor Joseph Brown. a list of the Georgia Volunteer Regiments, "in the service of the Confederacy, a speech by John Breckinridge, a run- away slave ad, To Arms! notice with James Grubbs trying to raise a unit in Summerville, and that's just the first page. There is much more interesting content in the rest of the paper.  

Condition:  Some glue residue on the left side where the paper was no doubt removed from a binding.  There are tears in  both margins which extends somewhat into the content.  The right edge has the most tears, see the scan. Wear along the middle fold and a small tear at the middle of the middle fold.  Light to moderate foxing.

Southern Recorder Milledgeville Georgia newspaper

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Sixth Plate-Confederate Soldier-Ringgold Georgia,
Item #: NEW-0015078

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Paypal may not be used on this image, though payment plans are welcom.

I purchased this image along with another image in a antique mall in Ringgold Ga in 2000.  The image of two brothers, only identified as "Williams brothers” sold recently.  This image came from the same dealer who said it was a cousin to the Williams brothers.  These images were published in the Confederate Calendar in 2002.  The research was done by Keith Bohannon and I did no further research.  There were four men named Williams who enlisted in Confederate Army units from Catoosa County, Ga, Lewis C Williams, joined Company F, 39th Ga Infantry on March 4, 1862 and was surrendered at Greensboro.  The other three enlisted on the same day and I tend to believe that it was the two brothers and their cousin.  Their unit was 2nd Company D, 1st Confederate Infantry.  Amos Williams compiled service record shows him present on Feb 29, 1864, although Henderson’s Roster of Georgia Soldiers claims that he died of disease after that time on an unknown date.  George W Williams deserted at Fort Gaines, Alabama on Nov 26,1862.  William N Williams received a wound on Aug 8, 1864 during the siege of Atlanta and there is no further record of him.  

This image is a sixth plate ambrotype.  He was found in a half case and I provided this case for the image.  The pillow is a beautiful dark green, though the scan did not capture that.  The soldier wears a shell type jacket with extensive colored cloth trim.  He is armed with a sword and revolver.  His sash was tinted red by the photographer, and the buttons on his hat and jacked were tinted gold.  Please view the scan to show the condition of the ambrotype.  

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Nathan Bedford Forrest-Double Signature-$1000 Bond
Item #: NEW-0014950

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This double sided bond measures 20 X 17 inches and bears the signature of General Nathan Bedford Forrest on both sides.  The complete bonds are becoming more scarce as many have been cut up to sell Forrest's signatures.  After the war Forrest became President of the Selma, Marion, and Memphis Railroad. No paypal on this item although payment plans can be arranged. The bond is framed but will be removed and mailed without the frame.

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Nathan Bedford Forrest-Memphis UCV Program-11th Reunion
Item #: NEW-0014935

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Nice condition on the 1901 Program featuring Nathan Bedford Forrest, Robert E Lee, and Stonewall Jackson on the cover. Numerous illustrations including buildings in Memphis Tennessee. This is a must have for the Forrest collector.

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Nathan Bedford Forrest Cavalry Corps Badge
Item #: NEW-0014934

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This item is now available due to a failed payment plan. Near perfect specimen of this highly sought badge.  There is a little bit of the blue paint missing from the middle part of the badge.  See scans.  Hate to part with this one from my collection. No paypal on this item though payment plans can be arranged.

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Congressional Medal of Honor Paper Lot-Signed Gideon Welles
Item #: NEW-0014828

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No paypal on this item though payment plans can be arranged. 

This lot consists of two items related to the Medal of Honor award to John H Farrell, a civilian who was the pilot of the U S Monitor Neosho during the Civil War.  This paper work was separated from the actual medal which, of course is illegal to sell and I have no knowledge of the whereabouts of the medal.  I have determined through my research that there are no restrictions to the selling of the paper work. The items consists of the transmittal letter which was signed by Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy.  The second page is blank and is separated through most of one fold.  There is a small separation at this same fold on the cover page.  Some stains of the back.  The letter explaining the heroic act is also on two hand written pages, with the last page mostly showing the signature of S P Lee, who was Samuel Phillips Lee who was the acting rear admiral.  Lee was related to Robert E Lee.  Short separations on the edge of the folds and stains, especially on the last page.    

This can be verified by many sites on the web but this Find-A-Grave entry gives a short summary of the events and provides a photograph of Ferrell.   http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=8085241 Here is the content of the entry:


Birth: Apr. 15, 1829
Death: Apr. 17, 1900

Civil War Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient. He served as a Pilot (Captain) in the Union Navy. His citation reads "Served on board the USS Monitor Neosho during the engagement with enemy batteries at Bells Mills, Cumberland River, near Nashville, Tenn., 6 December 1864. Carrying out his duties courageously during the engagement, Ferrell gallantly left the pilothouse after the flag and signal staffs of that vessel had been shot away and, taking the flag which was drooping over the wheelhouse, made it fast to the stump of the highest mast remaining, although the ship was still under a heavy fire from the enemy." (bio by: Don Morfe) 

Here are the transcripts of the two paper items:

The letter of Dec. 19 1864 is headed Mississippi Squadron, Flag Ship, Cincinnati Cumberland River and signed by S P Lee,  AR admiral (Acting Rear Admiral)  (Lee was related to Robert E Lee)

Here is the content of the letter:

Sir, My attention has been called by your divisional commander to the gallantry displayed by you in the action of the 6th inst when the "Neosho’s” flag and signal staffs being shot away, and the flag lying drooping over the wheel house, you with sr master Jno Dietzenbach, left the pilot house of that vessel while she was yet under fire of the enemys artillery and musketry and displayed the flag from the stump of the main signal staff, the highest mast remaining.

Your conduct in thus promptly displaying the national flag in the face of the enemy is worthy of high commendation and I will take pleasure in bringing it to the notice of the navy department, Respectfully yours, S P Lee (written in a different hand) aR admiral, commanding Miss Squadron

The second item is the actual transmittal notice, an official form from the Navy Department Washington, date given as Aug 21, 1865. (presumed) 

Sir, I have the pleasure of transmitting herewith the MEDAL OF HONOR awarded to you by the Secretary of the Navy, in General Order, No 59, dated June 22 1864, for gallant and meritorious conduct whilst serving on board the U S Monitor Neosho, during an engagement at Bell’s Mills, on the Cumberland River, Dec 6, 1864, please acknowledge its receipt, Very Respectfully, Gideon Welles (actual autograph)   
 

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UCV Sheet Music-Nathan B Forrest-Robert E Lee-1901
Item #: NEW-0014342

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This is a rare sheet and this is the best example I have ever had or seen for that matter despite the condition problems.  It is titled the United Confederate Veterans UCV March.  The color lithography is very vivid but there are condition problems. It is complete with five pages.  Old use of Scotch Tape to hold it together and it was not assembled correctly so the pages are not even.   There is some chipping to the edges and tears as well on the edges. There is a long tear that extends into the Memphis UCV emblem.  There is a split in the surface at the bottom of the large C in UCV.  There is a tear from the spine almost to the sword. Inked signature of  previous owner. The sheet was produced by O K Houck in Memphis and Little Rock. Date MCMI or 1901 which was the date of the convention in Memphis

Excessive postage paid will be refunded.

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Rare UCV Reunion Postcard-Memphis Tn-1924
Item #: NEW-0014340

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This is quite a rare card.  Beautiful graphics but dark spots and lighter ones are scattered.  See scan.  Some corner tip wear but no creases.  It was not mailed and says on the back, Confederate Veterans' Reunion at Memphis Tenn, June 4, 5, 6. 1924.

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Program-First Annual UCV Convention-1890 Chattanooga Tn
Item #: NEW-0014328

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This beautiful UCV program is from my collection.  It features  General John B Gordon on the cover.  The United Confederate Veteran reunion was held in 1890.  The program has 36 pages.  Complete with minor wear to the covers.  Lithographs of several of the generals in the slightly acidic pages. See scans. Note:  This program has been reproduced but no modern printing can equal the beauty of color lithography.  

Shipping Weight: 0.13 lb
Price: $420.50 USD
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Sam Davis Statue-Photo of Unveiling-Nashville
Item #: NEW-0014272

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This wonderful mounted albumen has many condition problems but falls in the category of try to find another one.  The board has been trimmed to fit the photograph which has chipped corner and edge wear.  Someone way back when wrote in ink "Unveiling Sam Davis Statue State Capitol-Nashville Tenn June 1909."  Someone in later years added May or.  The family members were pointed out by ink additions.  1. Palmer D (Davis) 2 Elizabeth D (little girl standing on the statue base, and 3 Ida D.  Palmer's number can't be seen but he may be the one standing by the ladies with the hats.  Note the policeman standing near Elizabeth.  I was informed that this was originally in the hands of the family which donated it to the UDC, who gave it to a treasured volunteer.  That's as far as I could trace it. The photo measures 9 and a half by 7 and a half inches. 

Davis was captured near Minor Hill, Tennessee, on November 20, 1863, wearing a makeshift Confederate uniform and in possession of Union battle plans. He would not give the name of who gave him the items. For this reason, he was arrested as a spy, and was seen as ineligible for the privileges of a prisoner of war. Instead, he was sentenced by a drumhead military court to die by hanging unless he was willing to divulge the name of his contact. He is purported to have said, "I would rather die a thousand deaths than betray a friend." Another famous quote, reminiscent of Nathan Hale, was, "If I had a thousand lives to live, I would give them all rather than betray a friend or the confidence of my informer.

He was hanged by Union forces in Pulaski, Tennessee on November 27, 1863. As he was trundled along to the hanging site atop his own coffin, Union soldiers alongside the bumpy wagon road shouted out their entreaties for his cooperation, lest they have to watch the grim execution. Supposedly the officer in charge of the execution was discomfited by Davis' youth and calm demeanor and had trouble carrying out his orders. Davis is alleged to have said to him, "Officer, I did my duty. Now, you do yours."
 


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Southern Rights-Jefferson Davis Paper Item
Item #: NEW-0014271

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This broadside measures 8 by 6+ inches and is from the Civil War period.  Some condition problems including a tack hole on  left side, some staining and someone has partially tried to copy Jefferson's name under his name.  The graphics were created by a stamp.  It was taken from an album as can be seen by the back. Likely this was made to hang in Southern homes.    

Price reduction                 

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Rare CDV-Reconstruction-Ku Klux Klan Costumes
Item #: NEW-0014245

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This CDV has an interesting story behind it.  After the Civil War ended, laws were passed to extinguish the KKK.  This particular image is documented to be Federal soldiers posing as KKK members with the costumes seized by them that were worn in a defiant parade in Huntsville Alabama.   The back verifies this by the writing on the back, "Ku Klux captured at this point by "US" forces Huntsville Alabama."  I have only seen one other image of this and it went quite a bit higher than I have priced it here.  Paypal will not be accepted on this items but payment plans can be arranged. 

See the following link http://www.gutenberg.org/files/31819/31819-h/31819-h.htm  This has a history of the event and an illustration of the types of costumes worn.  Page 7 of the Illustrations.

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The Champion of the South-Hon: Jefferson Davis-Color Graphics
Item #: NEW-0014244

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This stamped item measures 5 by 3 and a half inches.  Made on heavy paper.  Back shows it was in an album.  Nice Confederate patriotic theme that was made during the Civil War.

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Racist-Offensive-Rare Confederate Patriotic Cover
Item #: NEW-0014211

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I wouldn't be surprised if this is the only example of this unmailed cover.  This was included in a very large collection of covers that I purchased and paid too much for. Small cover which measures 4 and 1/4 by 2 1/2 inches.  "Proceeding of the U S Congress for '61 and 62'.  The Nigger, the Whole Nigger, and nothing but the Nigger." See second scan to see that it has glue residue on the back.

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Confederate Patriotic Cover-Unlisted-Unused-Texas
Item #: NEW-0014201

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This cover was in a Confederate Cover album that I paid a fortune for. just to get two of the covers. Bold, defiant message which portrays the attitude of most Texans. Texas! Our Lone Star Flag has been flung to the breeze, and now bids defiance to the enemies of the South."

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Confederate Letter-Cover-Ft Harris Memphis
Item #: NEW-0014135

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Both items in this lot are in poor condition.  The letter has separations at the folds, including one which extends a fourth of the way through.  There are also holes.  The letter is written from Fort Harris, a fort which was abandoned early in the war but during the time of the letter was being fortified. The fort was in Memphis Tennessee and named after the Governor Isham Harris.  The cover is missing the back, quite faded and ragged and the provisional stamp was removed by some eager stamp collector.  Here is the content of the letter.  Not sure of the writer's name but it may be D Winters and addressed to Misters Woods & Perot (I think).  Here is the content of the letter:

Gents  I am just building an (sic) fortification for our defence (sic)..I am sorry, that I canot (sic) do anything for you but am bound to do everything against you--whenever peace will be closed  I shall do everything for you--but in these times I am against you

The letter was written before the formal secession of Tennessee from the union. Davis was named president of the Confederate States of America on February 18, 1861 so this is any early use of a rare Confederate cover.

Here is a little information on Fort Harris found on the web. 

Governor Harris ordered fortifications to be made to protect Memphis and the river. A fort bearing his name was built just north of the city on Mill's Plantation. Civil engineers WD Pickett and Montgomery Lynch were enlisted to build the fort. The soldiers and their artillery were ordered north to Forts Randolph, Pillow and Donelson. The fort was located near the mouth of the Looshatchie River, on Chickasaw Bluff Number Three. 

price adjustment
  

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Soldier Letter-4th Ga Brigade-Phillips Legion-Camp Brown-Marietta
Item #: NEW-0014108

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Two and a half page letter on Confederate patriotic stationary and cover.  The letter is from Camp Brown-4th Brigade-Camp Brown which was in Marietta Tennessee.  The soldier is R A Jones whom I was able to find in the Civil War Data Base.  His record is not complete as he was in what was a camp of instruction. He later enrolled as a Lt. in "B" Co. GA 15th Infantry.  His military career ended early due to his hospitalization.  The letter is interesting as he is telling his wife that Brown wanted to keep the Georgia troops in Georgia which was a continuing controversy between Brown and Jefferson Davis.

The rare seven star cover was mailed with a U S Stamp (though upside down) and through no date is visible it clearly belonged to some other correspondence which was later than the letter in this listing.  It is addressed to Mrs. M E Jones of Carnesville- Franklin County Georgia.  The R A Jones in the record attached was from Franklin County so I feel certain it is one and the same soldier.  Here is a transcript of the eight star Confederate stationary letter.

Camp Brown
Head Quarters "4" Brigade

Dear Wife,

I embrace this opportunity of writing (sic) you a few lines.  I am in good health and hope that you are enjoying (sic) the same blessings of Providence.  ( will correct words from now on) I think that the Longato (Lougoto ?) blues are advancing in military tactics as fast as any company in the camp.  I never saw as much union in as large a crowd as there is here in my life.  They are as a band of Brothers.

I have not saw but one drunk man since I came here and he was in the guard house in five minutes.  Joseph E Brownn was here on the 30th and spent a day and night-he is the man for the times in my judgment.  The ladies of Marietta gave a fine dinner to the officers of the fourth Brigade  it was a nice treat.  I do not know what day we will start for home.  General Phillips intends that we shall be drilled throughly and I think that it is one of the best things that Georgia can do.  Brown stated in his speech here that this Brigade should be kept for the defense of Georgia until he was satisfied that she would not be invaded and if called in to service that we should go as a Brigade which is in my judgment the best organization in the state and men trained under God fearing men such as we have need not fear.  I would love to be a home at my farm and enjoy your presence but this is not a time to count dollars & cents.  I have no doubt but that you are conducting that as well as you can.  I have not received no letter from you write soon..  Closing comment May 3rd 1861 Your obedient husband R A Jones

Residence Franklin County GA; 
Enlisted on 7/14/1861 as a 1st Lieutenant.

On 7/14/1861 he was commissioned into "B" Co. GA 15th Infantry 
He Resigned on 11/6/1861





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Appomattox Parole-Mobile Steamer-Hugh P Davis-12th Mississippi Inf
Item #: NEW-0013733

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This lot consists of two items:  The first item is parole for Pvt. Hugh P Davis of the 12th Miss Infantry, (Co I Satartin Rifles) which was executed at Appomattox on April 10th 1865.  Also included in the lot is a form from the Office Provost Marshal in Mobile Alabama dated May 3rd, 1865, which gave permission for Davis to return home by steamer.  This was the day before the official surrender of the Confederate departments of Alabama, Mississippi and East Louisiana regiments. This grouping was under the command of General Richard Taylor but his subordinate Col. J Q. Chenowith surrendered the Department in Mobile on May 4th at Citronelle Alabama. Davis also served in F Co according to his records.
 

I have given a great deal of thought as to why one paper was issued at Appomattox and why the transportation form is from Mobile, almost a month later.  My best guess is that the Office of Provost Marshall form was used as it was available and that the main purpose was to transport the soldiers back to their homes. I believe the steamers arrived with forms on hand.  There was a delay between the dates the parole was issued, possibility due to the confusion over the Union Army's responsibility in helping the soldiers get home.  General Lee felt that he had a side agreement with Grant to transport the soldiers home but Grant did not always approve such plans.  The soldiers in prison camps were all provided transportation but the policy relating to soldiers in the field was more murky. At any rate, in this case the steamers arrived to transport them to Mobile or possibly New Orleans to take some of the soldiers up the Mississippi.  See this link which describes some of the issues involved in the transportation of soldiers home: http://www.history-sites.com/cgi-bin/bbs62x/alcwmb/arch_config.pl?md=read;id=35993 

Both documents have some wear as can be seen in the scans.  The Mobile form has been mended with archival tape on the back. The body of the document reads that H P Davis "has permission to proceed by steamer to his home is Holmes Mississippi."    

Here is Davis's  record.  I also have his complete record which will be sent with the paroles. It does show that he was wounded on June 7, 1864, likely at Cold Harbor.

Hugh P. Davis

Residence was not listed; 
Enlisted on 4/1/1861 as a Private.

On 4/1/1861 he mustered into "I" Co. MS 12th Infantry 
He was Surrendered on 4/9/1865 at Appomattox Court House, VA
 (Estimated date of enlistment)

 Historical Data Systems, Inc.

The 12th Mississippi was a very active regiment, engaging in many major battles at great overall loss of lives.  A cursory web check has not turned up any post war information about Davis.

 
   








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Fort Delaware POW-Cover-Maj John T Carson-”First Fifty”
Item #: NEW-0013684

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One page letter relating to A W (Aretus William) Hicks & Rufus ( Presumed to be William R) Hicks 4th Georgia Infantry.  Letter was written by their commanding officer,  Major John T Carson of the 12th Ga

Officer Barracks Division 22
Fort Delaware
May 30 1864

Dear Sir, (Edward Hicks)

Mr Jones Hicks of Macon Co, Georgia & myself married sisters his eldest for A W Hicks also married my sister last December.  This I hope is sufficient introduction at present.  I am a prisoner of war away from my family and friends without means or even a change of clothing.  I trust this simple announcement is all that will be necessary to your generous nature if in the scope of your ability, I know I shall receive help, judging you from those of your relatives I am acquainted with  Capt McMichael, a nephew of Jones Hicks is also here with me in destitute  circumstances.  Any favour shown us will be highly appreciated and repaid whenever circumstances permit.  Yours with high esteem 12th Ga Regiment.  J T ( Major John Thomas) Carson May 12th. See his soldier history at the end of this listing and his sad end)

Note the holes at the very top and bottom. Condition is apparent from the scan.

The letter was mailed in a cover with a Delaware City cancel but stamp torn off.  There is also a faint stamp which reads prisoner letter.  See scan. 

Here is some further information on John Thomas Carson, provided by the Fort Delaware Society which updates and corrects some of the information given in his Confederate records, that I have furnished below.

Major Carson was among the "First Fifty” officers sent from Fort Delaware on 26 JUN 1864 down to Hilton Head, South Carolina for a special exchange for fifty Union officers of equal rank beging held under fire in Charleston. This "First Fifty” group predates the Immortal 600 by one month. These 50 officers were held aboard the Steamer Dragoon at Hilton Head in July 1864 while negotiations were under way. The First Fifty were handed over to Confederate authorities and declared exchanged in Charleston Harbor, SC on 3 AUG 1864.

Major Carson was furloughed home on 3 AUG 1864 and rejoined the 12th Georgia Infantry for duty on 5 SEP 1864. He suffered a gunshot wound to the abdomen on 19 SEP 1864 at Winchester, VA and was evacuated to Lynchburg, VA where he was admitted to the Confederate General Hospital No. 3 on 26 SEP 1864. He died at the Lynchburg hospital from his wounds on 1 OCT 1864.  

John Thomas Carson

Residence Macon County GA; 
Enlisted on 6/15/1861 as a 1st Lieutenant.

On 6/15/1861 he was commissioned into "C" Co. GA 12th Infantry 
He died of wounds on 9/30/1864


He was listed as:
* POW 3/15/1864 (place not stated) (Or May 1864; est. day)
* Exchanged 7/15/1864 (place not stated) (Estimated day)
* Wounded 9/19/1864 Winchester, VA


Promotions:
* Capt 5/8/1862 
* Major 6/9/1863 


Intra Regimental Company Transfers:
* 6/9/1863 from company C to Field & Staff 


Other Information:

Buried: Carson Family Cemetery, Macon Co., GA

(Buried in Carson Family Cemetery, south of Reynolds,
 Macon Co., GA)

Sources used by Historical Data Systems, Inc.:

 - Roster of Confederate Soldiers of Georgia 1861-1865
 - Information provided by HDS subscribers

Aretus William Hicks

Residence Macon County GA; 
Enlisted on 4/29/1861 as a Private.

On 4/29/1861 he mustered into "I" Co. GA 4th Infantry 
He was discharged for disability on 10/19/1861 at Camp Jackson, Richmond, VA

On 3/20/1864 he mustered into "I" Co. GA 4th Infantry 
(date and method of discharge not given)


He was listed as:
* Wounded (date and place not stated) (1864)
* Furloughed 8/31/1864 (place not stated) (Home, wounds, no further record.)


Sources used by Historical Data Systems, Inc.:

 - Roster of Confederate Soldiers of Georgia 1861-1865
(c) Historical Data Systems, Inc. @ www.civilwardata.com

William R. Hicks

Residence Macon County GA; 
Enlisted on 4/29/1861 as a Private.

On 4/29/1861 he mustered into "I" Co. GA 4th Infantry 
(date and method of discharge not given)


He was listed as:
* Wounded 9/19/1864 Winchester, VA (No further record)


Promotions:
* 1st Sergt 


Other Information:

Buried: Hicks Cemty, Macon Co, GA

Sources used by Historical Data Systems, Inc.:

 - Roster of Confederate Soldiers of Georgia 1861-1865
 - Various Cemetery listings on the internet
(c) Historical Data Systems, Inc. @ www.civilwardata.com

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Daily Huntsville Confederate-Rare Traveling Newspaper-Marietta Ga
Item #: NEW-0013668

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This is an example of a rare paper which started in Huntsville Alabama but ended up on the run from federal occupation.  The history of this paper is very murky although it is clear that specimens published on the run are quite rare.  This paper has numerous problems as can be seen in the scans so I'm not going to list them all.   It appears to have been handled by a wanna-be restorer who ended up causing more damage due to excessive bleaching and improper pressing.  Clearly as can be seen in the scan, there are multiple stains and a large hole which is probably a cigarette burn.

This is a single sheet, printed on both sides. dated September 3, 1863 and published in Marietta Georgia.  Editor J Withers Clay.  There is a lengthy report of the President to the Soldiers of the Confederate States.  There are areas so light that you cannot read the text.  More visible on the reverse page are a run away slave ad, notices to Conscripts, and rewards for reporting deserters.    

The historical significance of this paper trumps the poor condition, in my opinion.  I found another example of this paper in one of Gary Hendershot's catalogue from 1999, listed for $3,500.  This paper was printed in Chattanooga in August 11, 1863,  After the occupation of the federal army, the paper probably moved on to Georgia. It would be a worthy project to attempt to make a historical account of this paper.  Am selling this paper, as is.

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17th Texas Vol Infantry Regiment-Letters-Theodore A Supple
Item #: NEW-0013665

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This lot consists of five items, though only partial scans are shown. 

 The very small note sized letter is from Supple to his wife, Mary Supple and is two pages long. This letter is dated November 25th, 1863 from Alexandria Louisiana. The cover is addressed to Mrs. Mary F Supple Belton, Bell County Texas.  Also written on the over is 17th Regiment, T V I, Lowrey's Brigade Walker's Division. There are two confederate stamps on the cover with no signs of cancellation. Here is some of the content:

Letter opens with instructions to his wife on how to make a sack coat.  Some further husband talk. " We are still post guard at this place.  Our division is on the Miss about 90 miles from here, firing on gun boats, transport and with about 30 pieces of artillery we sunk one transport and fired into two others which run back.  The groans of the wounded on those two was horrible.  They are now paroling about 670 prisoners 3 miles from this place.  They were so delighted at the thoughts of being paroled that they slept none the first night they heard it and not much since, about half of them say if they could ever get home they would never return to their army any more.  They say they would be protected at home.  I don't like to talk to them.  They are so ? that there is no satisfaction in conversing with them.  It is a matter of wonder to the boys to see their ignorance, even Captains knowing comparatively nothing.  One or two of them say they will kill me if they ever have an opportunity.  I told them I would not own a negro who had not more intelligence than the average of them"  rest is family talk.  Signed T A Supple.

The second item is a blue rag legal sized paper with writing on both sides.  "My dear  husband" and signed Mrs. F Supple, no doubt another family member.  Date but no year given.  "I received a letter from Ma yesterday.." James (?) was drafted will leave soon.  They did no know where they would go.  Captain Pratt gave him a fine horse.  Ma had an Indian Squaw  there these days.  She had been taken prisoner and ran away from them and came to Ma's in the night.  More but very difficult to read so I give up.  James she referred to is probably JJ Supple who was also with the 17th.

The third item is as a three page letter written on rag paper to Mary from her Mother.  This letter is badly stained and the misspellings and phonetic words makes it difficult to read.  She does mention that the "Lampasas Company is to be mustered out today and then James will be home."  The letter was mailed as a stampless cover but there are no postal markings on it.  The letter was roughly opened causing a strip of lost content toward the end.   

Additional items are a  cover addressed to Mary Supple in Belton, Bell Country Texas.  It has a confederate stamp on it. There is a date written on it October 15th 1862 in another hand. I don't know if the postmaster would have written that or not but there are no cancels on the cover.

The last item is an envelope relating to Mary Supple's husband's confederate pension.  Hard fold and almost separated. 

Clearly all these items came from some one's estate and I've done the best I can to sort it out.

Here is a link which gives the history of the Seventeenth Texas Infantry: http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/qks12

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Orphan Brigade-CSA-1915 Postcard-32nd Reunion
Item #: NEW-0013596

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I believe this postcard to be very rare. The card was addressed to Judge Emory Speer, a very important man who joined the 5th Ky Regiment at the age of 16 and went on to become a prominent lawyer, judge, and politician in Georgia.  

The card is in poor condition with numerous creases but is still striking in the graphics.  Features General Breckenridge, Hanson, Hewitt, Helm, Lew, Wright and Buckner.  The reunion was held in Harrodsburg Kentucky.  Thos D Osborne Sec'y Louisville Ky.    

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Ambrotype-Confederate Soldier-Heavily Armed
Item #: NEW-0013314

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Great sixth plate ambrotype in a worn and separated case.  There is some damage to the image which can be seen in the scans. He is holding one gun and has another in the same area probably stuck in his belt.  He has a dagger stuck in his belt as well and he appears to be holding the hilt of a sword, the rest of which cannot be seen. The soldier has the stare of a man that has seen battle.  I can provide no history on this soldier. No paypal on this item though payment plans can be arranged.

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9th Michigan Inf Soldier letters-Nathan Bedford Forrest Raid-More
Item #: NEW-0013162

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This lot consists of five letters written by James H Smails who enrolled in the beginning of the war as a Sgt with the 9th Michigan Infantry, G Company.  At some point he later had service with the U S Army 11th Infantry. I will begin with the most important letter (though it is out of order) in which he describes the furious surprise raid of Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest during the first Battle of Murfreesboro.   

The letter is four pages, possibly incomplete.  It is written from Camp Chase in Columbus Ohio, dated July 31st with no year but would be 1862.  It is written to Jennie Livingston from Saline Michigan who was his cousin.  I am skipping the personal content. I have scanned only one page. There is wear to the mid folds with one small and one larger hole.

.."You will be anxious to hear from me as you have probably seen my name on the list of the wounded. I am getting along fne and expect to be in Michigan in a few weeks.  I was wounded in the early part of the engagement .  The ball striking me in the left side and passing through to the right side where it lodged and was afterwards cut out.

We were completely surprised about day light on the morning of July 13th by three thousand five hundred cavalry under command of the Rebel General Forrest of Georgia. part of our Regiment being on detached service there were five companys (250 men) in camp.  The 3rd Minnesota Regt was encamped on the other side of town nearly 200 miles distant and they could render us little assistance, the attack was first made upon our camp  they came upon us before we were hardly out of our beds.  but the boys fought bravely and repulsed and drove them from the field twice.  they then returned to the town to destroy our commissary stores. our skirmishes continued fighting until noon when it was perceived that it was useless to hold out any longer against such overwhelming numbers.  the Rebels then came into our camp and after taking every thing noticeable set fire to our tents and clothing and started with the prisoners in the direction of Chattanooga.  I do not wish to criticize the officers of the 3rd Minn Regt but I think they were scared into a surrender.  They had four pieces of artillery and nearly a full regiment of infantry and in the opinion of a great many could have defeated the enemy had they fought like the 9th Michigan.  We are now prisoners of war having been all paroled and for my part we shall never be exchanged."  Letter is not signed and may be incomplete possibly due to being a POW. The letter was written in the hand of James H Smails as can be seen by examining the other letters in this lot. The letter has one edge tear and some stains.  The smudge in two areas is where someone, most probably a child penciled over the word but I was able to erase a lot of it.    

The second listing is a two page legal sized blue rag letter, sent from Muldraugh Hill, Camp Blair which was a Union encampment and training facility.   The letter is dated January 8th 1862 shortly before the first Battle of Murfreesboro. Some breaks at the folds and a couple of stains.  You can see small holes when held to the light not affecting the content.  Signed by J M Smails. I am furnishing a partial transcript of the letter, giving the most interesting content.

The letter is addressed to My Cousin 

"I am pleased with the life of a soldier.  I have been the least sick so far and if you could see me I guess you would think there was no danger of my being so very soon for I never was so busy in my life.  The health of the Regiment has improved very much since I wrote last.  On Saturday six companies left this camp and marched to a place called Nolin which is about thirty miles from West Point-as soon as another Regiment comes here we expect to follow.  At present our camps looks desolate... I can tell you it will be with pleasure that we join the regiment.” 

The third letter is a three page letter dated June 20th 1862 and is written from Murfreesboro, Camp Park??, again written to his cousin.

"I have been completely tired out with our recent long marches...I have had my first initiation into the hardship of a soldiers life...Our Regiment left camp on the 29th of May and little did we think we were to have forced marches for the next sixteen days over mountains, through valleys and under the heat of a burning Southern sun.  A distance of four hundred miles before we returned to it again. but we did it and in my opinion accomplished comparatively little.  although we had the satisfaction of a few shots at the Secesh and the pleasure of seeing them get out of the city as fast as they could comfortably and I think a little faster than was agreeable to the most of them."

"The Brigade to which our Regmt is attached arrived at Chattanooga on Saturday night June 7th and on Sunday Morning the 9th Mich was ordered forward and at fifteen minutes past here we commenced firing upon the enemy which were upon the opposite side of the River but as the distance was almost to great for our small arms the fire was not very effective and the fighting was done principally with artillery.Our cannons soon silenced the Artillery of the Rebels and in the afternoon they evacuated the city we expected to go over and occupy it but the General Commanding said the objective for which we came had been accomplished and we immediately commenced our homeward march we reached Murfreesboro just sixteen days from the time we started. having crossed the Cumberland Mountains four times since our return we have removed our camp and I think we have if anything a pleasanter one than before." The rest of the content is personal lamenting the marriage of his girl friend.  Signed by J M Smails, Murfreesboro Tennessee.

The last letter of substance is three and a half pages and is written from Fort Independence, Boston Harbor, dated May 12th 1863.  Fairly large separation at one of the center folds, along with a small edge tear.  It is also addressed to his cousin.  Full signature but the gremlin with a pencil has blackened his initial and last name.
   
Smiles begins his letter explaining why he had not written sooner.  "...I have several times been within a few miles of your home, while the 27th infantry was at Cincinnati.  I was there twice, looking for deserters, but did not have time to visit you.  I was stationed at Detroit for some months on recruiting service for the regular army...”I have been in the field but little since I was taken prisoners, luckily for me I was detached from the Regiment and ordered to report at this post for duty.  It is really a delightful place only a mile and a half out in the Harbor and but a few rods from the main channel, and we have such a fine view of all vessels from our ocean steamship down to the pleasure yacht, some of which are passing continually.... The Regiment is now in Virginia and participated in the late Battle at Fredericksburg.  A good many from my company were killed and sounded, some of them very intimate friends, how fortunate that I am so far from the fields of slaughter...Rest in personal.  Signed James H Smiles with the initial and last name blotted out with pencil. 

As noted I have not scanned all of the pages of the letters.  Only one of the covers appears to belong to a letter, the Forrest raid one.  The dealer I purchased this lot from found them in her Aunt's estate but clearly some were lost over the years.

The last scans show all of the covers which came with the lot.  The first one shown may belong to the Forrest Raid letter, The second one has a faint cancel from Boston Mass with the stamp cut off and only part of the Paid showing.  The third is from Cincinnati Ohio with a clear and fancy cancel.  The next has a clear cancel from Boston and a fancy cancel over the stamp.  It is separated on three sides and nearly separated at the bottom.  Finally there is the back of one letter with a stamp and his finger print pressed in it.


Shipping Weight: 2 lbs
Price: $858.00 USD
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Confederate Diary-Tintype-Letters-Crenshaw Battery-Gettysburg
Item #: NEW-0013101

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The listing includes the diary of James F Newman, a tintype of him in his uniform, and a collection of letters written to his wife. Newman fought at Fredericksburg, Gettysburg, Chancellorsville and was involved in several  skirmishes.  

The first scan shows a sixth plate tintype of Newman in his uniform.  Complete case but detached.  Good condition except for the partial outline from a previous case preserver.     

The next item is the diary of Newman who enlisted on March 14 1862 in Crenshaw’s Battery-Pegram’s Artillery Battalion- 3rd Corps-Army of Northern Virginia. He was enrolled as a corporal but was reduced to a private after an illness. At some point, he joined Captain Fry’s Virginia Light Artillery.  Newman served until his capture at Five Forks when he was imprisoned at Point Lookout until Lee’s surrender. Newman was a policeman before his enlistment and after the war served as an assembly member.   


The diary is small as can be seen in the scan and is battered from being carried in the war.  It is confusing as with most old diaries it was also used by children scribbling, in this case drawings as well as notations prior to and after the war.  

There are 45 pages of his war entries in the first part of the book and it continues after non relevant pages toward the back of the book for a few pages.  Strangely these are not entries later in the war, but earlier.  The handwriting was difficult at times but mostly legible. 

 The diary covers the dates Oct 12 1862 through December 25, 1863.  Much of the diary is taken up with the difficult marches, lack of food, camp and personal news but there is battle content, including  Fredericksburg and Gettysburg. 

Content of diary was deleted. 



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General John B Gordon Post War ALS-Great Content
Item #: NEW-0013097

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This is this a four page letter addressed to "My Dear Col:”  The letter is dated June 15th, 1871. Two pages (3 + of content) on the graphic letterhead of Nashville’s most famous hotel, The Maxwell House.  The Maxwell House was the gathering place for the national leaders visiting Nashville. My best guess is that Gordon and Nathan Bedford Forrest were meeting there to discuss their upcoming appearance before a Congressional Committee investigating the activities of the KKK.   Gordon was known to be the titular leader of the early organization of the KKK but he denied this charge. Forrest, of course, also denied that he was the founder of the Ku Klux Klan before the committee.    

The letter is actually a summation of Gordon’s activities during the Civil War.  He was, of course, known for his ferocious leadership of the men who served with him.

Here is the complete transcript:  I have not scanned the entire letter in which he is responding to a request from the "Col” to summarize his Civil War service.

"Yours directed to Atlanta has been forwarded to me here and I give you as nearly I can remember the dates of my commissions.

I was promoted to the rank of Col in April 1862.  To Brig Gen after the battle of Sharpsburg in Maryland-in which battle I was shot 5 times .I do not remember the precise date of this commission.  

My promotion to Maj General was in consequence of my repulse of Hancock at Spotsylvania C H.-when he broke our lines & captured Gen Ed Johnson 7 command-12th May 1864,

I was then place in command of the 2nd Corps in December 1864 & commanded it until the end of the war & after the retreat from Petersburg & Richmond .  I commanded one half of the Army of Longstreet ??at the surrender.  Should you desire any further information, you will find the most correct acct in Pollard’s book-”Lee & His Lieutenants”-  I think it is called.  While not correct as I learn in many respects his acct of my services are more accurate than any I have seen any where else.  

With the hope that the delay consequence of my absence from my house may not inconvenience you, I am truly yours, J B Gordon.

Gordon then adds this P.S.

My Brigade was composed of 6 Ga Regts-13th-26th-31st-60th.

My Div was composed at first of my old Brigade, afterwards commanded by Brig Gen C A Evans of GA-the Va Brigade formerly commanded by Gen Pegram, then by Gen Terry of Va-and Johnson’s N Carolina Brig-caused by Brig Gen Robt Johnson of N. C. to which was added the La Brigade of Hayes & Stafford consolidated & commanded by Brig Gen York.

My Corps was Jackson’s-the 2nd Army Corps-composed of my old Div, just given above commanded by Gen Evans-of the Div formerly commanded by Gen Rodes and the old "Stonewall” Div of Virginians, commanded by Gen Jno Pegram & after his death by Gen Ramseur of  N.C. & afterwards by Gen Bryan Grimes-N.C.

To my corps were added on the retreat from Petersburg the remnants of several divisions-giving me nearly half of the army.

Condition:  One small tear at mid edge.  Both pages are slightly tacked to another sheet of paper at the left edge.


  

     


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ALS-John Mosby-Partisan Ranger-Great Content-Post War
Item #: NEW-0013094

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Five pages of content on a letter to "Gaston", dated July 19,1904, signed by Jno S Mosby. The letter is on the letterhead of the Department of Justice, Washington D C. Here is a partial transcription. I have omitted the personal content. Included in the listing is the circular announcing "Recollections of a Mosby Guerrilla" for the September issue of the periodical Munsey written by John W Munson, including a letter from Col. Mosby to Munson." Of course Munson later published a book with the title of Recollections of a Mosby Guerrilla.  Some edge tears.

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Dear Gaston,

     As I write the date of this I am reminded that on this date, 43 years ago I was a private in the First Va Cavalry marching with Joe Johnston from the Shenandoah Valley to join Beauregard at Mannassas.  How little I then thought that I would ever hold an office under the U S Government.  I enclose a circular which I want you to give to my friend ? Freeman...I suppose of course the South will be solid for Parker  (Alton)T.  She is joined to her idols.  I think our friend Teddy (Roosevelt) did some injustice in connection with my appointment.  I told you that in my presence he dictated a letter to the Attorney General  that he desired my appointment.  It was not made.  I was sent to Alabama.  I then doubted his sincerity.  I do not not doubt it now.  The hitch was at the Dept of Justice-not at the White House.  why I do not know.  I had no idea when I left Montgomery that I was not to be returning in a few weeks.  I had no intention of making any attempt to get a transfer but some of my friends here-without my knowledge saw the President and got it done. (there is more on this issue of him being transferred that I have omitted).

"I have just received a most urgent invitation to a great reunion of the Blue and Gray in Boston on August 13.  The President is expected and they expect 25 Confederates....In reply I have given a very indefinite answer.  The truth is I have no idea of going.  My old battalion also has a reunion on August 12th at Berryville in the Shenandoah Valley.  I will not go to it.  You know my aversion to such things...personal content and closing with his signature on the last page.

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UCV Ribbon-Morgan's Cavalry-John Hunt Morgan
Item #: NEW-0013090

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Handsome and scarce silk ribbon for General John Hunt Morgan's men.  Ribbon measures 8 by 3 inches. A couple to teeny spots.  No pay pal on this item though payment plans can be arranged. 

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Rare CDV-Confederate General Frank C Armstrong
Item #: NEW-0013066

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CDV's of General Frank Armstrong are quite rare.  This one is post war.  The notation "Frank C Armstrong  Brig Gen. Cavalry Division, Army of Tennessee, C S A." was made on the original image.  This is not a modern copy and there are no little dots in the image.  

Here is a history of Armstrong taken from Wikipedia:

Armstrong was born on the Choctaw Agency in the Indian Territory, where his army officer father had been stationed. Armstrong's father, Francis Wells Armstrong, died three months before his son's birth. In 1854, Armstrong's mother married Mexican-American War General Persifor Smith. In 1854, Armstrong accompanied his stepfather on an expedition of the United States Army troops into the New Mexico Territory. His gallantry in a battle against Indians near Eagle Spring gained him a commission as a lieutenant in 1855, following his graduation from Holy Cross Academy in Massachusetts. Armstrong then fought with Albert Sidney Johnston against the Mormons during the Utah War.

Civil War service

By the time of the Civil War, Armstrong was a captain in the regular army. He led a company of Union cavalry at the First Battle of Bull Run. However, Armstrong resigned his commission and on August 10, 1861, he joined the Confederate Army. As Armstrong's Union resignation did not go into effect until August 13, he was technically on both sides at the same time. He served as a staff officer under Confederate generals James M. McIntosh and Benjamin McCulloch before their deaths at the Battle of Pea Ridge, and was standing only feet away as McCulloch was killed.

In 1863 Armstrong was elected as colonel of the 3rd Louisiana Infantry Regiment, and was soon given command of the cavalry of Major General Sterling Price. Two months later, he was promoted to brigadier general and commanded a cavalry division under Nathan Bedford Forrest at the Battle of Chickamauga.

In February 1864, Armstrong requested a transfer to the command of Maj. Gen. Stephen D. Lee. He was assigned command of a brigade of Mississippi cavalry previously led by Colonel Peter B. Starke. Armstrong and his men accompanied Lt. Gen. Leonidas Polk's corps to Georgia and served in the Atlanta Campaign, before participating in Lt. Gen. John B. Hood's disastrous campaign. He saw action during the campaign against Murfreesboro, and led much of Forrest's rear guard after the Hood's defeat at the Battle of Nashville.

On March 23, Armstrong was assigned to the defenses of Selma, Alabama, one of the Confederacy's last remaining industrial centers. On April 2, 1865, his troops participated in efforts to defend the town against a much larger Union force under Maj. Gen James H Wilson and was captured later that day.

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Catalog Updated
11/30/2019 12:12:00 PM
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