Civil War
Letters-Documents-Confederate
40th Tn Confederate Rgt-Fort Pillow Camp Letters
Item #: NEW-0016643

Click image to enlarge
This lot consists of two letters written from Fort Pillow Camp.  This site later became notorious for the massacre of more than 300 African American soldiers by the Confederate Army.  The 40th Tennessee had a brief and confusing history.  It was also known as the 5th Confederate Infantry Regiment.   Company E was known as the Alabama Hickorys and even later became the 15th Arkansas Infantry Regiment.  

The 40th was organized in October 1861, was captured at Island No 10, released on parole at Vicksburg September 1862.  It was disbanded and companies distributed to other regiments in September 1862.

This is as complete a transcript as I was able to do.  I have corrected some of the spelling but left others as an examples.  The spelling of the names were corrected by the use of the Civil War Data System.

                                                                                                          Fort Pillow Tenn Nov 21 1861

Dear Father & Mother Brother & Sister

I set myself down this morning to drop you a few lines to let you now  I am well & very well satisfied.  We left Memphis past Tuesday and landed here. Seen a great many new sites to me since I left home.  Memphis is one of the finest looking places perhaps is very near & large as Somerville as we came through their streets lined with people.  I seen more people there than I have seen in all my life before.  Their was 15 steam boats some of them was 500 feet long as we came up it rained and blowed  in on me & some more of the boys got wet their Several of our boys sick with the measles  We left John Tunsill, Will Draper, Peyton Cryer, Bill & Dick Draper,  (Richard E Draper William G Draper) and E G Denton  (all members of E company-matched with the official roster) in Memphis at the Southern mothers til they get well.  They are waited on by women.  Their M T Chunn, John Smith, Frank , and two more I couldn't match but they had measles.  Three of them are in the hospital here  We have got to the highest mountain I ever seen  We are on top of it we can see for 5 miles up the river blockaded  Below us our cannons are planted on the edge of the bluff next to the river  The river is about four or five miles wide  hear this is a ditch all around us that no yankey can cross  Their is three thousand negroes working on the fort this is one of the best forts hear that is in the Southern Confederacy on the side of us is the ditch that no one can cross if they come over our cannons
we can whip fifty thousand men with our regiment  Their is some of the steepest hollers you ever seen the ? guard is a mile and a half from the camp.  I have not stud gard(stood guard) but one twenty for hours yet we have five tents  Theyre floored with planks.  The floor is about 2 feet off the ground  I have two of the finest blankets you ever seen and I hate to lie them down on the floor to get them dirty  if I had any way of sending them home I would have done it.  We have plenty to eat here and nothing to do  I want you to right we all the news  How are getting along with your cotton and write what John Stuart is doing whether he is making a camp or not.  Tell Bill ? he had better come to us  We have fine officers Bill is one of the finest little fellow I ever seen  The boys are all very well pleased   Closing comments and signed W H H Hagy

The second letter is headed Fort Pillow, December 5th 1861

I take the present opportunity of droping (sic) you a few lines this evening as I have an answer? yet  I am not more than able to wright this.  I have had the measels again but I am getting tolerable stout again.  I staying in the hospitale from Sunday til to day as I would not stay any longer   They would not gives me anything to eat  I think I will be able to help the boys about our horses.  We wish to stay hear this winter  we are all buillding us a cabin to winter in very near all of the boys that came from Morgan has had to get the mesales.  I can not wright very much this eaving as I am very weak but I will give you one of the letters in short time  I have a grate deal to wright you  There is not any more illness in camp but measels  You have no idea how I would like to see you all for a short time if I can keep my health I can do finely  I have not stood gard but once since I left home but it has not been on the account of sickness. This is a tolerable fine place hear out guns came hear last night  Their is more cannons and more balls of grape shot and blank shells than a few our men are practicing every day with the cannon   Their was one of our boats tried to pass without landing and we fired a blank cartridge at her and she did not notice it and then we turned lose a ball just before her   you ought to have seen her begin to make her way back to shore  The order here is not to let no boat pass withou landing  I believe that is all i can wright you.  How are your hogs getting along and cotten and wheather  it is worth anything or not matter.  I will tink of what you told me as long as I live  I can not wright nay more  tell all the boys howdy  tell marther and brother I will wright to them soon  give my love to John B Stuart thir is something els I have to tel you if I can not pay postage hear for letters as their is no post office hear and letters are passed by hand to us you must wright soon without fail...  Signed W H. H. Hagy  Direct your letter to t Pillow Tenn in the care of Capt. Whitfield, L M Walker Regiment 

W. H. H. Hagy

Residence was not listed; 
Enlisted on 10/1/1861 as a Private.

On 10/1/1861 he mustered into "E" Co. TN 40th Infantry 
(date and method of discharge not given)
 (Estimated date of enlistment)


Sources used by Historical Data Systems, Inc.:

 

Shipping Weight: 2 lbs
Price: $535.00 USD
Email to a friend

Samuel Griswold- Civil War Receipt
Item #: NEW-0016599

Click image to enlarge
Here is a nice go with for someone who has a sword made by Samuel Griswold of Griswoldville Georgia.  It is a Confederate imprint dated 10-7-1861.  This receipt is for $112/50 for one saw ?.  Signed by Griswold's agent R. Johnson.  Writing on the back shows that the purchase was made by William Daniel.

Here is a wikipedia link to Griswold's history:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samuel_Griswold



Shipping Weight: 0.13 lb
Price: $550.50 USD
Email to a friend

Document-Court Martial-Army of Tennessee-Officer Cowardice
Item #: NEW-0016307

Click image to enlarge
This is an interesting document of a trial being held with 2nd Lt. J (John) W Butler of Company F, 9th Mississippi Regiment involving four charges.  The first charge was that he "absented himself when his company engaged in the Battle of Murfreesboro.  The second charge was that on the second day when his brigade was ordered to take the lead that he "carry with him a spade to entrench himself".  The third charge was when his company halted, and before his company did commence that "he did commence to dig a hole in the ground in rear of his company for his own protection." resulting in some of his troops remarking "Look out boys, Butler is entrenching; there is going to be a fight."  The last charge is that he carried his spade with him and when the company again halted that he commenced building another hole.  During the trial he was found guilty on the first and fourth charge.  Consequently he was cashiered for cowardice on the battle field and that it be posted in the newspapers in and about camps in the State of Mississippi.

The document is on light rag paper with a stain that runs down the right hand side of the paper, caused by a strip of paper that it was glued to.  The document measures nine and a half by five and a half inches.  The heading reads Head Quarters, Army of Tennessee, General Orders No 66, Tullahoma Tennessee, March 29, 1863,

John W. Butler

Residence was not listed; 
Enlisted as a 2nd Lieutenant (date unknown).




He also had service in:
"A" Co. MS 9th Infantry 


Sources used by Historical Data Systems, Inc.:

 - Index to Compiled Confederate Military Service Records
(c) Historical Data Systems, Inc. @ www.civilwardata.com




Shipping Weight: 0.13 lb
Price: $317.50 USD
Email to a friend

Confederate Broadside-Kirby Smith-1862-Kentucky
Item #: NEW-0016289

Click image to enlarge
Neat little broadside that is listed as 1091 in Confederate Imprints, by Parrish and Willingham.  Wording by General Kirby Smith to warn and placate the citizens of Kentucky, promising that they have come as liberators rather than invaders.  Four of these are identified in the holdings of institutions.  Presumed to be scarce.  It was framed when I bought it and it was not a surprise to find that it had not been framed to archival standards.  The top was affixed with some kind of very sticky substance.  I had no choice but to trim a half inch off the top border.  The original measurements are given as 21 X 22 cm, which being old means nothing to me.  I still deal in inches.  I should have measured it when I removed it from the frame but I didn't.  It is six inches by six and a half inches showing in the frame and you can compare it to the second scan as to how much of the border is present.  There is some foxing and quite a few folds which can be seen better in the last scan.  I encapsulated the broadside between mylar and affixed it at the top with a removable strip so that it is fully protected now.  The third scan shows the frame but of course some of the frame was too large for the scanner.

Paypal will not be accepted for this item though payment plans can be arranged. It will be mailed in the frame, with proper care given.

Shipping Weight: 3 lbs
Price: $3,000.00 USD
Email to a friend

War Tax Receipt-1862-H P Davis
Item #: NEW-0016272

Click image to enlarge
This little receipt is in poor condition as can be seen in the scan.  Seven dollars and fifty cents. It seems unfair that this tax was levied against soldiers as well. This item came with a lot of documents relating to Hugh P Davis of the 12th Miss Infantry, (Co I Satartin Rifles) 

Shipping Weight: 0.2 lb
Price: $17.50 USD
Email to a friend

Letter-Wild Cat Battle Content-19th Tn Regiment
Item #: NEW-0015392

Click image to enlarge
This is a two plus page letter from Peter E Roberts mentioning the Battle of Wildcat. Folds, wear and difficult reading.  See scans.  

The letter is dated November 6. 1861. Campbell County.  Camp Zollicoffer,  Jacksborough (Jacksboro Tn).

"I recon you have herd all a bout the the fight at the Wild Cat den.  We lef camp buckner on the 29 of Sept drived here on the 5 of November and is now fortying this place  I don’t no how long we will stay her we may stay her all winter and we may leave her in a few days.” "it is interesting that we got her on saterday and one Sunday the ? was to cum on sunday the people of N. Jacksboro was looking for them but I guess they did not com  We will see them and help them thrue with it but I don’t think they will try it   We has ? 8 of them since we have been here  We coat (caught) one yesterday he was up on the mountin looken down at us  he was going home on a furlow from Wildcat but did not get go home .  I her your old friend Smith is ded  I was sory to her it  We has lost 2 out of our company John Burden (?) and S George  a good many are home sick  ther is right smart sickness her at this time but it is cold from them measels  We hav 6 in our mess and 3 of them is sick .... more camp news follows but it is either not that interesting or I can’t read.  

Direct your letters to Jacksborough Campbell Count Tenn by the care of Capten Snapp col Cumines 19 regiment Tenn Vol from Peter E Roberts.   

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Camp_Wildcat

The Battle of Camp Wildcat (also known as Wildcat Mountain and Camp Wild Cat) was one of the early engagements of the American Civil War (Civil War). It occurred October 21, 1861, in northern Laurel County, Kentucky during the campaign known as the Kentucky Confederate Offensive or Operations in Eastern Kentucky (1861).[note 1] The battle is considered one of the first Union victories of the Civil War, and marked the second engagement of troops in the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

Peter E. Roberts

Residence was not listed; 
Enlisted on 6/1/1861 as a Private.

On 6/1/1861 he mustered into "C" Co. TN 19th Infantry 
(date and method of discharge not given)
 (Estimated date of enlistment)


Sources used by Historical Data Systems, Inc.:

 - Index to Compiled Confederate Military Service Records
(c) Historical Data Systems, Inc. @ www.civilwardata.com
pbell Count Tenn by the care of Capten Snapp col 






Shipping Weight: 0.13 lb
Price: $257.50 USD
Email to a friend

Confederate Imprint-BH-Intelligencer Office-Macon Ga
Item #: NEW-0015333

Click image to enlarge
The Daily Intelligencer was an Atlanta paper dated was begun in 1849.  Toward the end of the Civil War the paper moved to Macon Ga due to the limited paper supply. Jared Whitaker was the proprietor. Once the war was over the paper moved back to Atlanta making it the only paper to survive the war.  This billhead is dated October 24, 1864.  The billhead has folds and is brown, due to staining or cheap paper that was available at the time.  The ink writing is faint.

Shipping Weight: 0.13 lb
Price: $157.50 USD
Email to a friend

Constitutionalist Newspaper-Augusta Ga Cover-Black Jack Stamp
Item #: NEW-0015266

Click image to enlarge
Embossed stamp of this famous newspaper which reads Constitutionalist, Proprietors  Stockton & Co. Augusta Ga.  Faint cancel but you can read the letters S, T, and A.  Andrew Jackson 2 cent stamp.  Back is clean with no tears, pencil writing which reads 6-6-42 c SPA, This may be an example of a US stamp being used by a Confederate State.  I believe that this is the tri-weekly paper.  See my Confederate Constitutionalist newspaper on site.

Shipping Weight: 0.13 lb
Price: $157.50 USD
Email to a friend

Confederate Patriotic Letter Sheet-1861-Civilian
Item #: NEW-0015248

Click image to enlarge
This was a civilian letter which has business content.  Writing is very faint but who cares.  Pictured is a firing cannon and a 12 sar Confederate flag.  Grey, perhaps faded blue rag paper.  Sold by Starke & Cardonzo.  See scan to view the condition.  Rugh left edge, tear at top left corner.

Shipping Weight: 0.13 lb
Price: $310.50 USD
Email to a friend

Scarce Certificate-Confederate States of America-1864
Item #: NEW-0015139

Click image to enlarge
This certificate was issued in Atlanta  in March of 1864.  N L Davis was paid one thousand dollars, interest on a bond he had purchased.  I think his payment may have been reduced by the "Act to reduce the Currency and to authorize a new issue of Notes and Bonds," approved February 17, 1864, upon the surrender of this certificate at this office. This was done when the Confederacy was running out of funds.  The certificate is signed by John N Duncan.  

The certificate appears to have been cancelled on the left hand side.  Stain on the bottom

Shipping Weight: 0.13 lb
Price: $68.50 USD
Email to a friend

CSA Soldier Letter-Turned Cover-1st SC Rifles
Item #: NEW-0014894

Click image to enlarge
This is a confederate cover addressed to D Wardlaw in Abbeville South Carolina.  Due 5 stamp and hand written note that it was a soldier’s letter, Co B Orr Rifles.  I cut the side to show the letter which was sent back to Sgt L A Woodlaw, Capt Pereins Co Willtown Bluff, Adams Run PO S C  "Care of Col Black”  Lewis  A Wardlaw was  assigned to SC 1st Orr’s Rifles Infantry. Five cent stamp with cancel for Charleston, S C. 

Shipping Weight: 0.13 lb
Price: $300.50 USD
Email to a friend

1863 Confederate Special Order No 8-Petersburg Virginia
Item #: NEW-0014779

Click image to enlarge
Brief Special Order dated March 7, 1863, issued by Major General S G French and signed by his Asst Adjutant General Captain Charles D Myers.  The order revokes Order No 7 which relieved Capt H A Cannon from duty at the Camp of Paroled Prisoners.  This was a copy for Captain N March Co "F" 27th Va Regt.

The Paroled Prisoner camp referred to was Camp Castle Thunder #1, VA. Petersburg City, VA.,  a converted tobacco warehouse.which held Federal POWs. It was named by the prisoners for the sound of artillery fire during the long siege. 

CDV's of Castle Thunder are also available on my site.
 

Shipping Weight: 0.2 lb
Price: $35.50 USD
Email to a friend

Stonewall’s Farewell Speech to Troops-Officer Letter-11/7/1861
Item #: NEW-0014520

Click image to enlarge
Paypal will not be accepted on this item though payment plans can be arranged. 
  
Two and 3/4 of a page on legal sized letter written in a legible hand by by Samuel J C Moore, an officer with the 2nd Virginia Infantry, more famously known as the Stonewall Brigade.  Please view the scans of the letter to see the condition.  It has been encapsulated but it can be cut off if desired. My scanner is not legal sized so it cuts off the end of each page.  I am showing the end of the first page in the second scan which does show some condition problems. 

Due to the length of the letter, I have selected the most interesting content to give in this listing.  A complete transcript was made and will be sent to the buyer. 

The letter is dated November 7, 1861 from a Camp near Centreville. He is writing his wife.

He opens with a description of a terrible storm which threatened to blow the tents away and his efforts to prevent that.

"Our great hope and expectation is that the the Federal fleet on the seas, has been scattered and destroyed.  If this has occurred, I should think it would go very far towards ending the war; so many men would be lost, and so large an amount that has been spent in fitting out the fleet wasted, that it would doubtless greatly discourage the Lincoln administration, and have a tendency to rest on their long lost senses.  I trust we may hear that their boasted armament has shared the fate of the famous Spanish Armada which was to conquer England and seep the seas, but which was rendered powerless by the blasting of the breath of the Almighty.”

 "General Jackson left us to day for Winchester, but took no troops with him, so that we may for the present at least, give up our hopes of Winchester for winter quarters." Moore then quotes Jackson’s famous speech as he remembers it.

The General made our Brigade a stirring little speech at parting, in which he paid it a great compliment.  He ended by saying in substance as follows:  "In the Army of the Shenandoah, you were the first Brigade.  On the bloody plains of Manassas, you were the first Brigade and I trust that you will continue to deport yourselves, so that I shall hear when the conflict is over that you were always the first brigade in our second War of Independence.”   "He is succeeded in the command of the Brigade by Genl Ewell ...”

"I missed quite a grand affair which came off here the day I left Berryville; Gov Letcher was here and presented to each Virginia Regiment in the field a banner, inscribed with Virginia's proud motto and her coat of arms.  He made a presentation speech, which was briefly responded to by each Colonel as the flag was place in his hands by the Governor, the Regiments meanwhile stand in line before them.  I got here in time Thursday to be present in command of the Company at a review by the Governor of the Virginia Army, and a noble looking Army it is.  It looks when all in the field together as though it might be alone a match for Lincoln's Army of Yankees.  The only state is surely up and a doing and has thus far acquitted herself nobly.  I trust she may never weary in well doing until the last insolent invader has been driven from her borders, or put under her soil, or into the broad Potomac."

Moore then speaks of the upcoming election for Captain and his concerns over a possible rival.  Moore was elected Captain. Content that follows is loving words to his wife.

"General Jackson is anxious to have the first Brigade with him, and as soon as it is ascertained we ware to have no jight here, which point will soon be settled, as the roads here will in a few weeks be impassable.  I think we will go over the mountains for the Winter, at any rate we hope so."  Closes with loving words to his wife and signs, Saml J. C. Moore. 

Note: I have other letters from Moore on my site:

Samuel Johnson Cramer Moore

Residence Berryville VA; a 34 year-old Lawyer.

Enlisted on 4/18/1861 at Berryville, VA as a 1st Lieutenant.

On 4/18/1861 he was commissioned into "I" Co. VA 2nd Infantry 
He was Surrendered on 4/9/1865 at Appomattox Court House, VA


He was listed as:
* Served 2nd Corps, Army Of Northern VA (date not stated) (As Asst Inspector Gen, dates not given)
* Detailed 8/25/1862 Army Of Northern VA (As Judge Advocate)
* Wounded 8/28/1862 2nd Manassas, VA
* Hospitalized 5/13/1863 Charlottesville, VA (Hemorrhoid)
* Returned 7/25/1863 (place not stated)
* Hospitalized 5/9/1864 Charlottesville, VA
* Hospitalized 6/27/1864 Front Royal, VA
* Assigned 7/29/1864 General Early And The Valley Army


Promotions:
* Capt 11/19/1861 (Elected)


Other Information:
born 6/29/1826 in Charlestown, VA
died 12/19/1908 in Berryville, VA 
Buried: Greenhill Cemetery, Berryville, VA

(Married Ellen Kownstar. Postwar, Lawyer and Judge in 
 Clarke Co, WV)

After the War he lived in Berryville, VA

Sources used by Historical Data Systems, Inc.:


Shipping Weight: 2 lbs
Price: $2,000.00 USD
Email to a friend

Death Payment-Confederate Soldier-2nd SC Volunteers
Item #: NEW-0014396

Click image to enlarge
Official form from the Treasury Department of the Confederate States, Richmond Virginia, dated December 18,1863.  Payment was made to Jane E. Chamblin, mother of the soldier J T Chamblin who was a Pvt. Co E, 2nd South Carolina Volunteers who died on July 1, 1862.  His death was worth $62.76. Slight crumpling and folds.

Note:  Scan has magnified the color of the slight bleaching on the light blue rag paper. It doesn't look like the scan.

Excessive postage paid by paypal will be refunded.

Shipping Weight: 1 lb
Price: $157.60 USD
Email to a friend

Confederate Letter-Greensborough NC-Letter-J Henry Smith
Item #: NEW-0014364

Click image to enlarge
There are two items in this lot.  There is a Confederate cover hand stamped "Paid 5" Greensborough North Carolina.  The cover is worn with ragged edges.  There is a letter from a prominent minister who preached to the troops and counseled the civilians.  His papers were preserved and cover his entire career.

A full transcript of the two page letter will be provided but I have omitted the personal content.

                                                                                                                                                                                     Greensboro, N C
                                                     June 24, 1862

Dear Hayly, 

He begins this letter discussing the stormy weather on his way to High Point N C:  

…the best winter we have had yet…in the nick of time for the "Burnside Expedition” against the Easter part of our state.  The news today are unfavorable from Kentucky.  The death of Zollicoffer , the defeat of his command and the loss of several hundred killed, with baggage, provisions, camp equipment.  But it will all come right, Jackson is doing favorable and successfully in he Northern part of the valley…personal, family content follows…plans to preach, funeral.  Love from us to all affectionately yours J Henry Smith.  Please view the scan to see the condition.  Some stains.


   

Shipping Weight: 0.13 lb
Price: $555.50 USD
Email to a friend

Va 26th Cavalry-1861 Letter-John William Jordan-Confederate
Item #: NEW-0014358

Click image to enlarge
This letter was difficult to research but I think I've got the right soldier.  Four page letter on notepaper and signed Jno W Jordan.  He writes from his camp near Germantown (Maryland) on Sept 5th 1861 to his Mother.  I have left out some of the personal content. (note in the soldier history than follows that the soldier was a recruiter which this soldier mentions.  The letter tells of his illness and the fact that relatives were allowed to take him from camp to be cared for by family members. He mentions a skirmish that Col Micha Jenkins was involved in a a comment about General Longstreet.  

Dear Ma.  ...I now writing in the country about 3 1/2 miles from out camp.  Uncle J has been waiting on me for 3 or 4 days.  I haven't much fever nor haven't had much except at first-it would raise very high in the nights & sometimes noon & evening.  You must not get alarmed for I could get no rest in the little hot tents.  I got here at this place safe the same evening I got your letters.  Mr Jas Calwell from Cheston Dist was at our camp with a little wagon and Uncle ..got him to bring me. Uncle couldn't come but Wm came with me.  Wm is down again today just leaving he bought some ? and mixture for me  Uncle will be hear tomorrow.  I suppose when he writes he can tell more about it than I can.  The surgeon can visit me also for I'm just on the road to the Hospital where they spoke of taking me but I said I would sty in my tent first of course Uncle J didn't want me to go to the Hospital.  William went in the country engaged this place for me and several days ago but I couldn't get off.  Uncle John says if it necessary for me to go to Charlottesville he'll get me off to W. B. C. says he will take me, but I don’t' think it will be necessary.  The Col would not consent for me to come her but Uncle John got me off.  All I want is a place to recruit.  I'll not be sick long...Some of the men asked the Col to let me go to Charlottesville and he consented.   So if I don't mend up I will go to Aunt Maria. ( More about how he is feeling)...Dr. Bryce is better I think his father is hear attending.  He is not our surgeon.  They spoke of making him our Camp Surgeon.  I wonder why Pa don't write to what he has done .  Col Jenkins Reg left camp the night of the 4th and sent to the Potomac with some Artillery company & fired from this side upon them & put them to fight.  Jenkins (Micha) Regt had to march about 16 or 18 miles so you see the Yankees are not very thick this side of river.  I suppose you have heard that Genl Longstreet has take a position call "Munson's Hills" or some such a name. Closing remarks, Your son Jno W Jordan.    


Residence was not listed; 
Enlisted as a Private (date unknown).




He was listed as:
* Recruiting 11/7/1863 Millboro Depot (For 60 days)


He also had service in:
"A" Co. VA 26th Cavalry 


Other Information:
born in 1813
died 2/14/1883 in Lexington, VA 
Buried: Stonewall Jackson Cemetery, Lexington, VA

(Died age 70.)

Sources used by Historical Data Systems, Inc.:

 - The Virginia Regimental Histories Series
(c) Historical Data Systems, Inc. @ www.civilwardata.com



Shipping Weight: 0.13 lb
Price: $127.50 USD
Email to a friend

Southern Rights-Jefferson Davis Paper Item
Item #: NEW-0014271

Click image to enlarge
This broadside measures 8 by 6+ inches and is from the Civil War period.  Some condition problems including a tack hole on  left side, some staining and someone has partially tried to copy Jefferson's name under his name.  The graphics were created by a stamp.  It was taken from an album as can be seen by the back. Likely this was made to hang in Southern homes.     

Shipping Weight: 2 lbs
Price: $757.60 USD
Email to a friend

Marshall T Polk-Signed Confederate Requisition-Whiskey
Item #: NEW-0014196

Click image to enlarge
This "Special Requisition" was made in the field for "good whiskey" to treat the sick and wounded.  Dated April 30,1863, from Shelbyville Tn. Marshall T Polk was the nephew of James K Polk and was related to General Leonidas Polk as well.  His career came to an ignoble end when he was found guilty of embezzling funds from the State of Tennessee when he was the treasurer and he served time in prison.  The requisition is signed on the back by Marshall T Polk, Lt Col Commanding.  

Shipping Weight: 0.13 lb
Price: $275.00 USD
Email to a friend

9th Tennessee Infantry-Confederate Soldier Letter-1861
Item #: NEW-0014193

Click image to enlarge
One + page letter dated November 16,1861 from Columbus.  Written by A D Chandler to his sister A E Chandler.  Letter is worn with multiple folds, small holes and some separations.  Blue, laid paper.  "cutting all the timber from one regiment to another and you must work all the time for I was on guard last night and I feel very drowsy and sleepy".  Letter is difficult to read but he reinterates that it is hard for him to be working on the battery and guard duty as well.  Back of the letter has all the sending information identifying the soldier and his Regiment.  

Shipping Weight: 0.13 lb
Price: $127.50 USD
Email to a friend

POW Letter-Cover-Camp Douglas
Item #: NEW-0014160

Click image to enlarge
This listing includes a letter and cover from W S Penny who was with the 2nd Kentucky Cavalry.  The bottom half of the letter is very faint but you can barely make out his name.  I have had other letters from this soldier or I would not have been able to read it. The letter is dated December 15, 1864 and the cover is dated December 17.  The cover has some condition problems but has a desirable Camp Douglas Examined Prisoner Letter stamp.  Not a clear stamp as can be seen.  The cancel is from Chicago Illinois and there is a fancy cancel on the Government Stamped Envelope. Trimmed at the right hand side as can be seen in the scan.

As mentioned the letter is hard to read but he speaks of the cold weather and the death of a mutual acquaintance (can't read the name). He asks if she can give him news of his brother.  I just can't read the rest but feel sure that someone with better eyes and more patience can make it out.  See another letter by this soldier on my site.

Shipping Weight: 0.13 lb
Price: $357.50 USD
Email to a friend

Early Confederate Letter-Patriotic Cover-Ft Harris Memphis Tennessee
Item #: NEW-0014135

Click image to enlarge
Both items in this lot are in poor condition.  The letter has separations at the folds, including one which extends a fourth of the way through.  There are also holes.  The letter is written from Fort Harris, a fort which was abandoned early in the war but during the time of the letter was being fortified. The fort was in Memphis Tennessee and named after the Governor Isham Harris.  The cover is missing the back, quite faded and ragged and the provisional stamp was removed by some eager stamp collector.  Here is the content of the letter.  Not sure of the writer's name but it may be D Winters and addressed to Misters Woods & Perot (I think).  Here is the content of the letter:

Gents  I am just building an (sic) fortification for our defence (sic)..I am sorry, that I canot (sic) do anything for you but am bound to do everything against you--whenever peace will be closed  I shall do everything for you--but in these times I am against you

The letter was written before the formal secession of Tennessee from the union. Davis was named president of the Confederate States of America on February 18, 1861 so this is any early use of a rare Confederate cover.

Here is a little information on Fort Harris found on the web. 

Governor Harris ordered fortifications to be made to protect Memphis and the river. A fort bearing his name was built just north of the city on Mill's Plantation. Civil engineers WD Pickett and Montgomery Lynch were enlisted to build the fort. The soldiers and their artillery were ordered north to Forts Randolph, Pillow and Donelson. The fort was located near the mouth of the Looshatchie River, on Chickasaw Bluff Number Three. 
  

Shipping Weight: 0.13 lb
Price: $650.00 USD
Email to a friend

1863 Confederate POW Letter-Camp Chase Prison-Good Content
Item #: NEW-0013955

Click image to enlarge
Two page letter on note paper written from an unknown soldier since his name was born out.  It is likely that this was done by a censor.  This letter, however came with a lot of other POW letters from a Williamson County Tennessee family.

Miss Lizzie, Nothing is so unfortunate as to be captured by your enemys (sic) and confined in prison: and nothing else would have induced me to "boldness sufficient” to address you by letter only that same misfortune.  I am a prisoner now at Camp Chase, that delightful little village of white houses constructed purposely for a temporary residence of southern gentlemen traveling in the north. And Oh! who is it that would not forego their liberty to be in so charming a place as prison.,,,but delightful as I would have you believe this place to be, it will not compare very favorably to a residence in Tenn, and especially to one in old Williamson or Davidson, even though your board here is gratis.  You have seen me laugh good humoredly and content ? the girls on the Harpeth (river) but..Large tear.(if I get back there?) you will think being a prisoner has not, or did not sour my temper much for I never intend to frown again, unless some one says I wish you were "a prisoner at Camp Chase.”  Miss Lizzie it is the loneliest place that I have ever seen or hope to see.  And tell your sisters  Fannie, Cassie, and Mollie, in mercy’s name  to remember B. H. and write to him 1st.  Tell Leidia that I would like to hear from her but that I can hardly have the gall to ask her to write after giving her a horse and then letting the Yankees get it before she ever saw it.  Oh to be confined is horrible ! there is men here that so restless they have walked around this pen until they are right ? and present the appearance of wild animals instead of men, they get plenty to eat too, and good enough.  I am limited to two pages, you are not, write immediately, all of you.  I was very unwell last night but am better today..I remain as ever your friend.  The next page has a huge tear out of it and you can only read Camp Chase Ohio, Prison No. B ?17  Pen scratching and finally Be Certain to write all of you.      

Shipping Weight: 0.13 lb
Price: $210.50 USD
Email to a friend

Fort Delaware POW-Cover-Maj John T Carson-”First Fifty”
Item #: NEW-0013684

Click image to enlarge
One page letter relating to A W (Aretus William) Hicks & Rufus ( Presumed to be William R) Hicks 4th Georgia Infantry.  Letter was written by their commanding officer,  Major John T Carson of the 12th Ga

Officer Barracks Division 22
Fort Delaware
May 30 1864

Dear Sir, (Edward Hicks)

Mr Jones Hicks of Macon Co, Georgia & myself married sisters his eldest for A W Hicks also married my sister last December.  This I hope is sufficient introduction at present.  I am a prisoner of war away from my family and friends without means or even a change of clothing.  I trust this simple announcement is all that will be necessary to your generous nature if in the scope of your ability, I know I shall receive help, judging you from those of your relatives I am acquainted with  Capt McMichael, a nephew of Jones Hicks is also here with me in destitute  circumstances.  Any favour shown us will be highly appreciated and repaid whenever circumstances permit.  Yours with high esteem 12th Ga Regiment.  J T ( Major John Thomas) Carson May 12th. See his soldier history at the end of this listing and his sad end)

Note the holes at the very top and bottom. Condition is apparent from the scan.

The letter was mailed in a cover with a Delaware City cancel but stamp torn off.  There is also a faint stamp which reads prisoner letter.  See scan. 

Here is some further information on John Thomas Carson, provided by the Fort Delaware Society which updates and corrects some of the information given in his Confederate records, that I have furnished below.

Major Carson was among the "First Fifty” officers sent from Fort Delaware on 26 JUN 1864 down to Hilton Head, South Carolina for a special exchange for fifty Union officers of equal rank beging held under fire in Charleston. This "First Fifty” group predates the Immortal 600 by one month. These 50 officers were held aboard the Steamer Dragoon at Hilton Head in July 1864 while negotiations were under way. The First Fifty were handed over to Confederate authorities and declared exchanged in Charleston Harbor, SC on 3 AUG 1864.

Major Carson was furloughed home on 3 AUG 1864 and rejoined the 12th Georgia Infantry for duty on 5 SEP 1864. He suffered a gunshot wound to the abdomen on 19 SEP 1864 at Winchester, VA and was evacuated to Lynchburg, VA where he was admitted to the Confederate General Hospital No. 3 on 26 SEP 1864. He died at the Lynchburg hospital from his wounds on 1 OCT 1864.  

John Thomas Carson

Residence Macon County GA; 
Enlisted on 6/15/1861 as a 1st Lieutenant.

On 6/15/1861 he was commissioned into "C" Co. GA 12th Infantry 
He died of wounds on 9/30/1864


He was listed as:
* POW 3/15/1864 (place not stated) (Or May 1864; est. day)
* Exchanged 7/15/1864 (place not stated) (Estimated day)
* Wounded 9/19/1864 Winchester, VA


Promotions:
* Capt 5/8/1862 
* Major 6/9/1863 


Intra Regimental Company Transfers:
* 6/9/1863 from company C to Field & Staff 


Other Information:

Buried: Carson Family Cemetery, Macon Co., GA

(Buried in Carson Family Cemetery, south of Reynolds,
 Macon Co., GA)

Sources used by Historical Data Systems, Inc.:

 - Roster of Confederate Soldiers of Georgia 1861-1865
 - Information provided by HDS subscribers

Aretus William Hicks

Residence Macon County GA; 
Enlisted on 4/29/1861 as a Private.

On 4/29/1861 he mustered into "I" Co. GA 4th Infantry 
He was discharged for disability on 10/19/1861 at Camp Jackson, Richmond, VA

On 3/20/1864 he mustered into "I" Co. GA 4th Infantry 
(date and method of discharge not given)


He was listed as:
* Wounded (date and place not stated) (1864)
* Furloughed 8/31/1864 (place not stated) (Home, wounds, no further record.)


Sources used by Historical Data Systems, Inc.:

 - Roster of Confederate Soldiers of Georgia 1861-1865
(c) Historical Data Systems, Inc. @ www.civilwardata.com

William R. Hicks

Residence Macon County GA; 
Enlisted on 4/29/1861 as a Private.

On 4/29/1861 he mustered into "I" Co. GA 4th Infantry 
(date and method of discharge not given)


He was listed as:
* Wounded 9/19/1864 Winchester, VA (No further record)


Promotions:
* 1st Sergt 


Other Information:

Buried: Hicks Cemty, Macon Co, GA

Sources used by Historical Data Systems, Inc.:

 - Roster of Confederate Soldiers of Georgia 1861-1865
 - Various Cemetery listings on the internet
(c) Historical Data Systems, Inc. @ www.civilwardata.com

Shipping Weight: 0.13 lb
Price: $457.70 USD
Email to a friend

Camp Zollicoffer Soldier Letter-Confederate Cover-Cancel-Due Stamp
Item #: NEW-0013672

Click image to enlarge
One + page letter with some stains, especially at the top.  The letter is headed Sulivan Tennessee (Sullivan County) Camp near Carter (Carter County) September 28th 1863 (I think) 

I am still in a muddle as to who the soldier is and what unit he was in.  There are some clues but nothing has come together.

Dear Sister Fannie,

According to promise I embrace the present opportunity of writing you a few lines to inform you that I am well & hoping that these few lines may find you all enjoying the same great blessings.  I stood the march much better than expected I could   the Yankees left here the night before we got here  it is thought that we will follow ? them.  We had a little fight with them at Zolicoffer  (Zollicoffer) as we came on here the boys are all in good health & seem anxious to keep forward  I think the time is near at a hand when we will drive the Yankees all out of Tennessee again  thus many of us fall yet before it is done   the 29 lost two killed and five of her brave wounded at Zolicoffer  I saw Adelphus ? Morehead & brother James Morehead & a great many of my relations & friends at Zolicoffer they were all well  the report is in camp that Bragg has whipped the yanks very badly which I hope is true.  Tell Ma if she has any clover seed to sell please to save me one hushel and I will pay as much as any body. closing comments  Signed   J L ? Capell

The cover has a cancel from Petersburg Va and is addressed to Fannie Yance, Wytheville Va.  There is a large year on the right edge which can be seen in the scan.  One of the side flaps is missing on the back.  Carried by John Jones 11 Virginia ?  Due 10 cents stamp.


Shipping Weight: 0.13 lb
Price: $317.50 USD
Email to a friend

20th Tn Regiment-Dyer's Co Document-Samuel Stalcup
Item #: NEW-0013671

Click image to enlarge
This is a manuscript document signed by John H Morton, Asst Surgeon who certified Samuel "Stallcup" as temporarily unfit for duty,  The spelling of the name is different from the listing  listed in "Tennesseans in the War"  which is Stalcup. There is also a little receipt that came with it is a coffin receipt in 1873 by William Stallcup.  

There are condition problems to the document as can be seen in the scan.  Stains, folds, a punched hole and archival tape repair on back for the separations. The document is quite difficult to read but there is something at the end about rejoining his regiment or be regarded as a deserter.  I'll leave it up to someone with better eyes to decipher it.

Samuel Stalcup

Residence Smith County TN; 24 years old.

Enlisted on 6/15/1861 as a Sergeant.

On 6/15/1861 he mustered into "K" Co. TN 20th Infantry 
He was Surrendered on 4/26/1865 at Durham Station, NC
 (Estimated day of enlistment)


He was listed as:
* Oath Allegiance 5/1/1865 Greensboro, NC (Estimated day)


Other Information:
born 1/10/1837 in Smith County, TN
died 8/5/1917 in Union City, TN

(Married Nannie Byrn in October, 1869)

After the War he lived in Union City, TN

Sources used by Historical Data Systems, Inc.:

 - Index to Compiled Confederate Military Service Records
 - Confederate Veteran Magazine
(c) Historical Data Systems, Inc. @ www.civilwardata.com



Shipping Weight: 0.13 lb
Price: $37.50 USD
Email to a friend

Gen Thomas Benton Smith ALS-Rendered Senseless by Own Sword
Item #: NEW-0013349

Click image to enlarge
No paypal on this item through payment plans can be arranged.

This is the most significant of the letters of Smith that I have offered as he mentions his sword which was used to bash in his head at the Battle of Nashville, causing him to spend 47 years of his life in an "insane asylum."  Following the transcription there is a history of Smith, one of the youngest and most promising Confederate Generals and his sad end.

 This is a two page letter on note sized paper, front to back address to Will Carter dated March 25th 1903.  The content of the letter reflects his mental condition.

Here is the content of the letter:

Will Carter

"You weighed me and Ludy Woodord on your patent scales in the store built by James Turbiville a soldier of the 20th and 81st Tennessee."

"Wounded at the Battle of Nashville when I left my horse bridle saddle sword and side arms with General W B Bate Dec 16 1864.  When I went north to make peace between the Confederate soldiers of American and the United States of America as printed on all Confederate bills and President Jeff Davis the Democrat, served 2 years in Fortress Monroe and was release a hero by ? Bend while I was conductor N & C RR I order Thomas Dickerson to take my"... (rest is impossible to read)

Signed Tom Benton Smith President SA Cunningham Vice President March 25th 1903

Smith was born in Mechanicsville Tennessee in 1838. A bright young man with a gift of mechanical inventiveness, he received a patent for a locomotive pilot at the age of 15. He enrolled in the Nashville Military Academy (Western Military Institute) He was working for the Nashville & Decatur Railroad when the war broke out. He gave up that job to help raise a company of volunteers in and around Triune. That company merged with a group raised by Joel A Battle and eventually became Company B of the 20th Tennessee Infantry. 

Smith saw combat action in the Battle of Mill Springs and Shiloh. Smith was promoted to Colonel at the age of 22. Wounded seriously in the Battle of Murfreesboro-Stones River and was out of action for much of 1863. He resumed field duties and led his troops at Baton Rouge, Hoover's Gap & Chickamauga when he was again wounded. He was promoted to Brigadier General on July 29,1864 becoming the youngest General in the Army of Tennessee. At the battle of Franklin, his staff officer Tod Carter was killed within sight of his home and Smith informed the parents and searched the battlefield for his body. During the battle of Nashville, Smith surrendered and was captured by Union Colonel William L McMillan who beat Smith about the head with Smith's own sword, leaving his brain exposed and in a comma. Smith was not expected to live but recovered only to become a prisoner at Fort Warren. Released July 24th, 1865. Smith did some railroad work after the Civil War and ran for a seat in the U S Congress in 1870, but lost. Struggling with the permanent damage he suffered to his brain, Smith spent his last 47 years in an insane asylum in Nashville, appearing occasionally at UCV reunions.

Shipping Weight: 0.13 lb
Price: $880.50 USD
Email to a friend

13th Ga Infantry-Troup Factory Ga-Confederate Letter-Evans Guard
Item #: NEW-0013335

Click image to enlarge
This is a two page letter on legal sized paper.  It has multiple folds and couple of small separations at the folds. The writing is very legible.  The letter is headed Troup Factory Georgia, which does not exist today.  The letter is signed by Robert Leslie, who is probably a descendant of the early 
Manager of the factory.  Robert was a 2nd Sergeant. 

The letter is dated November 9th 1862, shortly after the Battle of Sharpsburg-Antietam in which Leslie’s unit, the 13th Georgia Infantry participated.  It is likely at this time that Leslie was wounded and later discharged from the army. At the time of this letter he was recuperating.  

Here is the content of the letter:

Dear friend, I have not received a letter from you since the regiment left Savannah last summer.  I suppose that it was with those letters of mine which were burnt in Maryland while I was at home discharged.  I went back to the army a short time ago… (Records show that a Robert Leslie enlisted on 1/15/63 and was mustered into "E” Co. Ga 46th Infantry.  He became a POW after the Battle of Franklin or the Battle of Nashville and was released on 6/19/65 from Camp Douglas in Chicago.  I believe it is likely that this was the Robert of this letter. )

"Owing to my physical debility I did not reenlist on my return from Winchester to Staunton”…" I should have come to spend some time with you during my trip, but for fear of being taken up by the military authorities. The boys were all right when I left them.  At the battle of Sharpsburg our company had one killed, and thirty two wounded, among the latter were Capt Long (James A Long), severely and Lieut (B F) Curtwright ( in the left arm also.  I shall remain home this winter, hence I trust that our correspondence will be interrupted…”  "Every man young man from this immediate neighborhood is either represented or is himself in the army.  We must provide for solders, many of whom are now barefooted, without clothes, or blankets.  A more self denying set of men never existed, never played their part upon the world’s broad stage of action.  A braver, mere patriotic, more daring, and unyielding army never were mustered together under such men as Lee, Jackson, Johnston, Beauregard, Bragg, who can doubt of success, but on the coast we are to severely tied this winter.  We are prepared to defend the coast.  A few months will determine, I’m disposed to think that Charleston and Savannah are both safe and do ardently hope that all the other places are securely fortified…"Your friend Robert Leslie Troup Factory Ga.

In the margins are notes  "My dear Jammie I received your letter yesterday Late in the evening Capt Carpenter is worse this evening and his father has been sent for." More notes.  

Note:  I was able to find a Captain James A Long who was wounded and a Lieut. B F Curtright in the Evans Guard, Company K.      


Shipping Weight: 0.13 lb
Price: $275.50 USD
Email to a friend

Greensboro Parole-A B Cone First Consolidated Ga Reg't Vols
Item #: NEW-0013224

Click image to enlarge
This is an end of the war parole for Private A B Cone, Co F in the 1st Consolidated Georgia Regiment Volunteers.  He formerly was in the Georgia 57th Infantry, enrolling in Thomas County.  Some wear and stains to the folds. One tear at the top fold. No paypal on this items though payment plans can be arranged.

Shipping Weight: 0.13 lb
Price: $1,200.00 USD
Email to a friend

1862 Invoice-Confederate Columbus Ga-Sending Cotton to North
Item #: NEW-0013210

Click image to enlarge
This establishment was originally based in Alabama but evidently relocated to Columbus Ga.  Blue rag paper and dated March 8th, 1862. The invoice was for 17 bales of  cotton and the total was $529.53. The cotton was sold for another person but I can't read the names.  The agents were King, Allen, & Camak. One has to wonder whether or not the cottom got through the Union blockade.

Shipping Weight: 0.13 lb
Price: $77.50 USD
Email to a friend

8th Georgia-End of the War Parole-J S Humphries
Item #: NEW-0012925

Click image to enlarge
This parole is dated May 17th, 1865 and issued by the Head-Quarters Cavalry Corps, Mississippi Division.  See scan to view the condition. 

Shipping Weight: 0.13 lb
Price: $557.50 USD
Email to a friend

ALS General Stephen D Lee
Item #: NEW-0012907

Click image to enlarge
This is a two page letter on the masthead of The Mississippi Historical Society, Columbus which Lee headed. The letter is dated Dec. 16, 1901 and is addressed to Judge J P Young (7th Tennessee Cavalry) Lee is unhappy with mistakes he feels were made in a recent article by Young.

My Dear Comrade,

     I enclose a letter from Cap’t Dinkins, it appears he wrote me and misdirected the letter to Columbus, Ohio.  My paper will be in Picayune (newspaper) next Sunday (Dec 21).  

While it is true, your 1892 article in the Scimitar may have been written to ascertain where Gen Cleburne fell, still it states specifically that such troops were engaged and that Lee’s (S D) Corps was not and ? division was omitted.  I had hoped thought that the correction would have been made  in the Scimitar and although I never doubted your intention to do full justice, I feel you have done in your book (unpublished); still it has been 10 years since the omission was made and I feel since Capt Dinkins fiasco (he is referring to Dinkins book,-"By an Old Johnnie") has resulted from the correction not being made at the time, so my dear friend I feel you should exert yourself in ( writing is a little jumbled but he is anxious over the correction being made and the rest of the content is about this)

The letter is signed Stephen D Lee


Shipping Weight: 0.13 lb
Price: $427.50 USD
Email to a friend

ALS Gen Stephen D Lee-Great War Content-Post War
Item #: NEW-0012898

Click image to enlarge
Two and a half pages on the masthead of the Agricultural and Mechanical College in Mississippi, of which Lee was President. The letter is addressed to J P Young who fought with the Seventh Tennessee Cavalry and wrote a regimental history of the Seventh along with other books.  This letter is the first in a series of letters between the two old soldiers recalling the events that they were both engaged in.

"I am in receipt of your letter of Jan 18th and can readily see and understand how you overlooked the night charge of Johnson’s division of my Corps.” (Ed Johnson) "as you had in your mind the grand charge of Stewart’s Corps, and two divisions of Cheatham’s Corps, in the afternoon.  It was a grand sight, and was a glorious and a gallant a charge as ever was made in any field of my troops-the bringing in a general description of the battle, to compare with Gettysburg & for that purpose only, it was a natural error, if it was an error. I really think now, you should write an account of the battle in detail-from your research, you are better prepared to complete the description more than any one I know, and I think you should do it.”
"About 12 years ago or longer, I wrote a description of the charge of Johnson’s division but never published it.  It was about the time Cheatham wrote his defense of Spring Hill, after Hood published his book. I thought I would possibly be drawn into the discussion & partially prepared to meet the issue-but I did not go into print-I have hopes, I might not have to write about that campaign as I was most friendly both with Hood and Cheatham.  They are both gone and could make no reply now-I am of opinion however, that the real cause of the failure at Spring Hill, has not come to light yet, it probably never will now but the one who blundered there and the ones who failed there are responsible for the lives lost at Franklin-and the failure of the campaign of Hood.”

I have written Marcus Wright for "data” about that campaign. If I get what I want I may at least write a partial account of Franklin as you did, and mainly describe the charge of Johnson’s division and explain why my corps was not in the battle.  There are several reasons why I should do this, but is with reluctance I write any thing about the war, as I firmly believe no participants can write a perfectly fair and unprejudiced account of battles in which he was engaged.”   Closing comments. Signed S D Lee.   

Here is a link giving information about Lee on the website of the Stephen D Lee Institute: http://www.stephendleeinstitute.com/about-sd-lee.html

Here are some of the organizations that Lee was associated with:  The Mississippi Historical Society, President. United Confederate Veterans, General Commanding, Agricultural and Mechanical College Mississippi, President and War Department, Vicksburg National Military Park Commission.    


Shipping Weight: 2 lbs
Price: $625.50 USD
Email to a friend

General Stephen D Lee-ALS-Confederate General-Post War
Item #: NEW-0012897

Click image to enlarge
This is a two page letter written by Confederate General Stephen D Lee.  It is on the letterhead of the Mississippi Historical Society in Columbus Mississippi, which Lee was President of.  The letter is dated December24, 1902 and is addressed to J P Young, a fellow Confederate officer and author of the regimental history of his unit, "The Seventh Tennessee Cavalry.”

This is one in a series of letters exchanged between Lee and Young.  It is interesting example of commentaries between the old soldiers which continued for years following the Civil War with blame being placed, events revisited and altered by the would be historians.  

Here is the transcript of what I was able to read.  Lee’s hand writing is very difficult to read so the transcription may have some errors.

"I am glad to hear the Scimitar will print my Picayune article.  I am much disillusioned by Capt Dinkins’ (James) rejoinder; it looks to me as if he has done himself injury as a writer in charge of the Confederate column.  He even yet maintains Johnson was in reserve (?) and at times introduces additional comments to show he was & says or virtually says he made no  omissions, but (he?) did and claims  that …‘my division was in the whole thing at Franklin.’  He says of his paper ‘There is not a ? in it-every statement it contains can be verified by official records”-  That is,  that only Cheatham & Stewarts’s Corps was in reserve and were not engaged.:  I will not notice his rejoinder myself, it is not worthy of notice-is "wishy washy”  I  could not think more highly of his two corps of Cheatham & Stewart,  than in the beginning of my article.  I see the Vicksburg  Herald (25) goes for him in a delicate way in the same paper, in which June 1892 article appeared.  I feel since you will fully understand my feelings in the matter in the desire to do justice to a gallant division of my Corps and the memory of the heroic dead.  

I hope too, you will in your monograph of Spring Hill, also include Franklin and the correction you have made to Johnson’s division.  
 
Closing comments , your comrade & friend, Stephen D Lee.  

Here is a link giving information about Lee on the website of the Stephen D Lee Institute: http://www.stephendleeinstitute.com/about-sd-lee.html

Here are some of the organizations that Lee was associated with:  The Mississippi Historical Society, President. United Confederate Veterans, General Commanding, Agricultural and Mechanical College Mississippi, President and War Department, Vicksburg National Military Park Commission. 


Shipping Weight: 2 lbs
Price: $450.50 USD
Email to a friend

ALS Gen S D Lee to fellow Confederate J P Young
Item #: NEW-0012878

Click image to enlarge
Two page letter on the masthead of The Mississippi Historical Society which Lee was President of. The letter is dated December 9, 1902.  Minor wear.  See scans. The letter is addressed to J P Young, an author and officer with the Seventh Tennessee Cavalry. This is one in a series of letters to Young that I purchased. Lee was a very capable commander who had sterling reputation post war as well.

My Dear Comrade,
 In the Memphis Evening Scimitar Dec 179’ 1892, you gave your account of the Battle of Franklin,  and left out Johnson’s division of S D Lee’s Corps (referring to Ed Johnson)  In a letter May 1894 you say " to make reparations to your splendid Corps for omission in my article 2 years ago.”  I called your attention to one omission and you have intended ever since to make the reparations. If you have intended ever since to make the reparations, & no doubt have done so in your ms (manuscript) which has never been published.  I have felt you should have corrected your article in the Scimitar if you did I never heard of it.

I mail you today an article in the Daily Picayune, written by Captain James Dinkins which resembles your article very much. (omissions & all) (This is underlined) I have felt I could not wait longer for your manuscript to be published (for I see now) because you have not-the omission of my division ? has virtually  gone.  Under these circumstances, had I quote from you, would it be out of good taste for you to emphasize my article and the fact of the omission in Dinkins papers. 
…more about Dinkins whom he does not think much of and accuses him of altering his paper and other complains.  He signs with his full signature Stephen D Lee.   

Here is a link giving information about Lee on the website of the Stephen D Lee Institute: http://www.stephendleeinstitute.com/about-sd-lee.html

Here are some of the organizations that Lee was associated with:  The Mississippi Historical Society, President. United Confederate Veterans, General Commanding, Agricultural and Mechanical College Mississippi, President and War Department, Vicksburg National Military Park Commission. 

Shipping Weight: 0.13 lb
Price: $557.50 USD
Email to a friend

36th Tenn Infantry-Letter-Bradley County Confederate Soldier
Item #: NEW-0012750

Click image to enlarge
This is one of a series of letters from this soldier on my site.  Henry Cate was a Confederate soldier from a family in Cleveland Tennessee which was split in their loyalties.  Henry had a brother who fought for the Union and a father who provided a lot of provisions (possibly reluctantly) to the Union Army when they occupied Cleveland.  Henry Glaze Cate was a Captain with Company C 36th Tenn Infantry.  Here is the pertinent content of the letter which was written to his sister. Three page letter with some acidic toning and a stain which can be seen in the last scan.

                                                                Montgomery Ala
                                                                 August 8, 1863

Miss Mary E Cate,

My dear sister.  Your letters have each been duly received and read with much joy.  Since the prisoners from Vicksburg have been passing, I have been too buy to write.  The throng at the door is constant.  A few days will determine whether I go to E Tenn or not.  The Chief Quartermaster is here now and I think of asking him to transfer me to the Dept of E Tenn.  It is hardly probable that he will do it though I think if he will not and offers me a situation that I like better than the one I have in this department I will take it and may leave this post soon.  Should I remain where I am I think I will have no difficulty in getting off to town in a few days.  Everything appears quiet now.  General Evans brigade is moving through now to Savannah Ga.  I know not what the move means.  They were sent on some time since to reinforce Johnston.  There will probably be a quietness in military circles for a while when the war will break out against with new vigor.  There are a great many furloughs granted now.  The army seems to be scattering about everywhere…Mentions a shooting incident that his sister had told him about and comments ”is one to be regretted but perhaps unavoidable at least justifiable.”  Closing comments.  Signed H C (Henry Cate).    


Shipping Weight: 0.13 lb
Price: $157.50 USD
Email to a friend

36th Tn Infantry-Henry Cate-Cleveland Tn-Letter-Confederate
Item #: NEW-0012616

Click image to enlarge
Four page letter written by Henry Cate, a Confederate soldier from a family in Cleveland Tennessee which was split in their loyalties.  Henry had a brother who fought for the Union and a father who provided a lot of provisions (possibly reluctantly) to the Union Army when they occupied Cleveland.  Henry Glaze Cate was a Captain with Company C 36th Tennessee Infantry. Here is the content of the letter:

                                                                  Montgomery Ala
                                                                   July 18, 1863

My dear Father,

As this is Sunday I have nothing else to do.  I will again write you.  Every day develops new and remarkable features in terrible crisis through which we are now passing.  Our land is now ? As it were through an ordeal of fire.  The tocsin of war has been sounded and situated and no means are to be left untried to turn back the invaders.  The conscription of all between 18 & 45 is now going on and efforts are being made to organize all the old men and boys into companies & battalions for local & state defense.  The entire strength is to be marshaled in arms and then the death struggle for I am in hopes Republican Independence.  Such are my hopes but my fears are different.  Already the Richmond Enquirer is a lengthy article advocates that the entire force old & young be put into camps and the country ruled with despotic powers.  It will be observed that this paper is the organ of the administration and says that this state of things should last only for the time being but without conjecture as to whether such will as will not be the case such state of government excites my worst fears.  The history of the world shows few instances in which men who have been clothed with powers as those delegated or assumed are willing to relinquish any part of it till forced.  All the clerks in office have detected men in government works are being urged to organize and drill and be ready for a fight.  There appears to be no fighting going on at present except at Charleston.  The bombardment still continues.  There is little but the Yankees are determined upon taking the city and it is not certain they will not succeed.  Johnson has, it is stated, fallen back to Meridian.  I do not know for certain that it is so but think it is. 

General Hardee is going on now to take the place of Pemberton in the Vicksburg army while General D H Hill will take his place in the Army of Tennessee.  Confederate money I am credibly informed is selling here at ten to one.  If you have nay you had better make the best investment you can.  If it is worth so little there as here and you can buy a State Bank of Tennessee at 2, 3, or even 4 it will be as good if not better than to buy gold.  No kind of property is worth anything now except land or hard money.  State money may be worth something as yet.  I had seen men of my acquaintance from Jackson who related the destruction of property & misery among the inhabitants as indescribable.  Every Negro that will go, that last pound of meat are taken.  All or very near all the wearing apparel and every article of furniture are taken or destroyed.  All the gold that can be procured whether in coin or jewelry plated ware or other wise is taken by a wanton soldiery.  All the works of art and the various kinds of ornamental pictures are alike destroyed.  Those who were wealthy yesterday and those in modest circumstances are today alike poor and in many instances drawing rations from the Federal Commissary.  Women tat used to ride in carriages with good horses and servants to drive are seen riding on ?  Many bear and get away many are unable to leave.  Refugees from New Orleans frequently stop at my office impoverished and exiled from home and ask transportation being unable to pay their way further.  Comparatively speaking we have never felt he war in E Tenn and hope and trust that the people of my state the land of my home will never be subject to the same senseless and and inhuman pillage and devastation as has the Miss Valley.  Though I cn not expect that it will not along with other sections of the Confederacy be overrun by Federal Soldiery but its natural strength may make it about the last place.  Cross writing on a portion of the last page.  Everyone should keep cool and look well to their own interest.  J A Cate is buying Negroes.  Signed H Cate     

36th Regiment, Tennessee Infantry (Confederate)

36th Infantry Regiment was formed at Knoxville, Tennessee, during February, 1862. Men of this command were from Knoxville and Bradley, Hamilton, and Marion counties. It served in the Department of East Tennessee and took part in the Cumberland Gap operations. In June it disbanded; some of its members were then transferred to the 35th, 43rd, and 63rd Tennessee Infantry Regiments. The field officers were Colonel Robert J. Morgan, Lieutenant Colonel John A. Dunn, and Major William A. Camp.

Note:  The 36th was disbanded very early in the war due to excessive desertions.  Undoubtedly Henry joined one of the three Regiments listed but is unknown which one.



Shipping Weight: 0.13 lb
Price: $417.50 USD
Email to a friend

36th Tennessee Confederate Officer Letter-Great Content
Item #: NEW-0012584

Click image to enlarge
This letter has four pages of content written by Henry Glaze Cate who was a Captain with Company C-36th Tennessee Infantry.  The Cate family lived in Bradley County and the family was split by one brother fighting with the Confederacy and the other for the Union.

Letter is headed Montgomery Alabama, July 12th 1863

Mr Wm Cate

My dear Father, since my last writing nothing except what is of a military character, has transpired to attract attention.  There has been much excitement here about the fall of Vicksburg, some contending that it had; and some that it had not fallen.  There are some yet, I believe that contend that the garrison has not surrendered, but I believe most are convinced of the fact.  Sometime since I wrote you that the war had progressed to a period where the subsequent pending battles must be decisive of some good or bad result to our army.  We have been heretofore battling with the foe with favorable prospects of success, still both party has lost immensely and had to call for reinforcements.  We have called for reinforcement & finally conscripted our able bodied men and have now the last available additions we can make to our army.  

What a spectacle! The fall of Vicksburg, the retreat of Bragg, the weakness of Johnston and I fear the late news from Va all indicate that we are too weak.  No one thinks it improbable that Port Hudson, Mobile Miss valley may fall into the possession of our enemy in a few months. Even here, there are many who would rejoice at it, from principle, and some few even who are Southern, so tired are they of the war believing it the speediest measure of making peace would be glad.  I have been deceived to some extent about the order of the Southern states.  Tenn is no more disloyal than other states: Miss is said to contain more union men than E Tenn.  Rosecrans’s movement seems to be to flank Bragg by per McMinnville, Sparta and so on into E Tenn perhaps by way of Kingston.  There is a good road and little interruption unless met by a superior force, except in the way of moving heavy artillery in that way you can all look out.  I shall not be astonished if the valley of E Tenn is yet bleached with the bones of the slain in battle.  Should such a thing occur, I think it will be at Chattanooga or somewhere on the Tenn river between there and Kingston perchance it may be in the Sequatchie Valley: but it is more probable that Bragg will retreat judging the future by the past, than advance.  Fighting has been going on at Jackson & Charleston: but nothing is known definitely of the result.  I think Charleston will hold out, but think likely Johnston will pull back.  Gen Johnston is not to blame, as I think in any way, for the retreat of Bragg,  or the fall of Vicksburg.  He was ordered here without a command, with no power to draw troops from either Pemberton or Bragg and when the power was delegated to him it was too late, and the men at his disposal too few.  I don’t think now he has more than twenty of twenty five thousand men.  The picture at present is dark, but may get brighter.  The movements of large armies are slow and tedious, we must be patient and wait for results.  
The price of sugar has advanced forty or fifty cents per found, in the last few days.  An evening or two since I rode in the country four or five hours in the direction of the prairie I never saw such corn fields.  It is one vast landscape as for as the eye can see, covered with the finest looking corn.  Farmers say it is not so good as it would have been had not the season been so wet. ..more non war related content and closing comments. H Cate   


Shipping Weight: 0.13 lb
Price: $487.50 USD
Email to a friend

Letters-Brothers-Split Loyalties-Cleveland Tn
Item #: NEW-0012521

Click image to enlarge
This two letter lot was taken from a larger lot which contains letters from two brothers from Cleveland Tennessee-Bradley County.  The Confederate soldier was Henry Glaze Cate who was a Captain with Company C-36th Tennessee Infantry.  His brother was Gustavus A Cate who was with the 12th Tennessee Cavalry, a Union Regiment. History of the two units can be found at the end of the listing.

The listing begins with "H Cate" who writes from Knoxville on December 10th 1862 to his father, William Cate.  I have included the most interesting content.  "You seem to have quite singular notions about me having nothing to eat.  You are much mistaken, I am living very well but much obliged for your kindness.  Tell Ma that I have had a pair of pants made off of my jeans..." "We have had a couple of cases of smallpox here they are getting well.  I have vaccine matter in each of my arms now.  I will send you enough..to vaccinate all the family.  There is no panic here not half so much danger as Cleveland I expect. I have heard that salt is arriving at Cleveland.  I hop you will be able to get through.  Be sure to get your back rations and all you are allowed now"... I think E Tennessee will be held till the last should the enemy over run the entire county and Tennessee will be the last. 
Respectfully H Cate." Condition includes folds and small holes along some of the folds.

The second letter is written from Camp Griffin, 12th Tennessee Cavalry, May 10th 1864 written to his sister Morlena Cate. Letter opens with personal content.  "I have been stationed at Nashville for the last three months until the last few days we moved down to Section 51 on the Nashville and Northern ? Railroad ? from Nashville to Memphis.  We have nothing to do here but drink  We have to scout a little occasionally there is some few bushwhackers back here though not a great many..."I am sorry to hear of Father's having to go to work though the time has come when every man must do something. When I left home I did not expect to be gone but a very short time though I have had a right smart wild goose chase of it  I have waited a right smart while before I concluded to join the army  I was exposed a right smart to the weather and the danger crossing the mountain.  I did not know when I would get home.  I thought that I would be about as safe in the army as out of it  I expect you would rather I had not joined the army through taking everything in consideration I don't know as I could have done much better. We see some very jolly times and some very hard ones though I think I can stand it.  I have not had one day sickness since I left home.(goes on to discuss how Small Pox has affected the men) and closing comments.  Signed Your Brother G A Cate.   Condition is good except for the folds and writing is not as light as the scan shows.

                                                     The 12th Tennessee Cavalry (Union)
Organized at Nashville, Tenn., August 24, 1863. Attached to District of Nashville, Dept. of the Cumberland, to January, 1864. Defences of Nashville & Northwestern Railroad to April, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 4th Division, Cavalry Corps, Dept. of the Cumberland, to October, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 4th Division, Cavalry Corps, Military Division Mississippi, to December, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 5th Division, Cavalry Corps, Military Division Mississippi, to February, 1865. 1st Brigade, 5th Division, Cavalry Corps, Military Division Mississippi, to May, 1865. Dept. of the Missouri to October, 1865.

SERVICE.-Scout to Florence, Ala., July 20-25, 1863 (Detachment). Duty at Nashville and on Nashville & Northwestern Railroad at Pulaski, Tenn., till November, 1864. Duck River April 22, 1864. Scout in Hickman and Maury Counties May 2-12. Lincoln County June 14. Scout from Pulaski to Florence, Ala., July 20-25 (Detachment). Triune August 3-4. Florence August 10. Operations against Forest in North Alabama and Middle Tennessee September 16-October 10. Richland Creek, near Pulaski, September 26. Pulaski September 26-27. Nashville Campaign November-December. On line of Shoal Creek November 5-20. Campbellsville and Lynnville November 24. In front of Columbia November 24-27. FranklinNovember 30. Battle of Nashville December 15-16. Pursuit of Hood to the Tennessee River December 17-28. West Harpeth River December 17. Spring Hill December 18. Rutherford Creek December 19. Curtis Creek December 19. Lawrenceburg December 22. Lynnville and Richland Creek December 24. King's Gap, near Pulaski, December 25. At Gravelly Springs, Ala., till February, 1865. At Eastport, Miss., till May. Moved to St. Louis, Mo., May 15-17, thence to Rolla, Mo., June 20-26, and to Fort Riley, Kan., June 29-July 8. Powder River Expedition July to September. Mustered out October 7, 1865.

Regiment lost during service 5 Officers and 28 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 2 Officers and 191 Enlisted men by disease. Total 226.

36th Regiment, Tennessee Infantry (Confederate)

36th Infantry Regiment was formed at Knoxville, Tennessee, during February, 1862. Men of this command were from Knoxville and Bradley, Hamilton, and Marion counties. It served in the Department of East Tennessee and took part in the Cumberland Gap operations. In June it disbanded; some of its members were then transferred to the 35th, 43rd, and 63rd Tennessee Infantry Regiments. The field officers were Colonel Robert J. Morgan, Lieutenant Colonel John A. Dunn, and Major William A. Camp.

Note:  The 36th was disbanded very early in the war due to excessive desertions.  Undoubtedly Henry joined one of the three Regiments listed but is unknown which one.

 


Shipping Weight: 2 lbs
Price: $255.50 USD
Email to a friend

1st Va Battn Light Artillery-Confederate Court Martial Trial Statement
Item #: NEW-0012197

Click image to enlarge
This is a one page plus which is the statement of Pvt. Thomas R Dodson of Co. C 1st Va Battalion Light Artillery (Hardaway-Moseley) regarding an incident where an officer ordered a soldier to drill and the soldier charged the officer.  Here is the transcript of this undated document. The signature is on the back of the scanned front.

"I was standing close by when the hands were at work at the building and I heard Mr Saunders say to the men who were standing in the embrasure and some men around the gun, 'is that the way you all drill men?'  He then asked who was captain of that gun.  They told him that Sergeant Davis was the captain of the gun.  He then called to Mr. Davis to go into drilling and the men spoke and said that Mr. Davis was with them and then Mr. Saunders called in Mr Connor to take charge of the men and go to drilling.  Then Mr. Connor took his place at the gun and Mr. Saunders told him to go on drilling, and some of the men proceeded to drill and some others did not.  Then Mr. Saunders told them if they did not go to drilling he would put them in the guard house, and from that Mr. Connor threw off his coat and ran at Mr. Saunders and told him that no God damned words he ? should put him in the guard house.  Then Mr. Baskerville asked Mr. Saunders why did not he ask him to correct the men, and Mr. Saunders replied why should he ask him to correct the men when he was standing there looking at them.  When the men crowded around Mr. Saunders he told Mr. Baskerville then to stand off and to to drilling.  I did not see Lieut Baskerville encourage the men against Mr. Saunders, but he told them to go on with their artillery and the men obeyed him.  None of the men except Connor showed any disposition to have any ? except Conner and Lieut Baskerville stopped him as soon as he could."  Thomas R.  Dodson.   On the back of the statement someone has written "Statement of Private Dodson."    

Shipping Weight: 0.13 lb
Price: $87.50 USD
Email to a friend

1862 Military Pass-Occupied Nashville-Former Confederate Officer
Item #: NEW-0012090

Click image to enlarge
This pass is dated November 10,1862 and was granted to E D Hicks through Union lines. Issued by Headquarters Department of Ohio, Gen Rosecrans and signed by Alvan C Gillem, Colonel & Provost Marshal.  Folds, wear to the folds and a large crease.  The back of the pass was a Loyalty Oath but was unsigned by Hicks.  Presumably the Oath had already been signed as Hicks moved freely through occupied Nashville.  This fact is rather remarkable as Hicks was commissioned as a 2nd Lt. in the Provisional Army of Tennessee, was the nephew of General Felix Zollicoffer and served briefly as his adjutant General until his resignation in October of 1861.  Hicks was from a prominent pioneer family whose homestead was known as Devon Farm.  

Shipping Weight: 0.13 lb
Price: $157.50 USD
Email to a friend

11th Tennessee Officer Commission-Capt William R Green-KIA
Item #: NEW-0012030

Click image to enlarge
This great document issued and signed by Governor Isham Harris, who was later to become a Confederate General.  This commission was for Captain William R Green who was assigned to the Eleventh Regiment of the Provisional Force of Tennessee Volunteers.  It is dated May 15th of 1861.  These early documents are scarce as hen's teeth.  It is on high quality paper, folds,and  some light crumpling.  Captain, later Major, was mortally wounded at the Battle of Missionary Ridge, was captured and then died from his wounds.  The document measures thirteen and a half by 11 inches. See scans. Paypal will not be accepted on this item but payment plans can be made.

Shipping Weight: 2 lbs
Price: $857.75 USD
Email to a friend

11th Tennessee Infantry-Blank Confederate Form
Item #: NEW-0012009

Click image to enlarge
This unused form required for the "Annexed Subsistence Stores."  Lists several provisions such as fresh beef, rice,coffee.sugar, salt, etc.  At the bottom it says "I certify on honor that the above provisions are for the use of myself and family." I'm not sure what an Annexed Subsistence Store was but I'm wondering if it was a place where civilians could obtain provisions.  Folds, blue rag paper.

Shipping Weight: 0.13 lb
Price: $47.50 USD
Email to a friend

Pre Secession Receipts-Nashville Prepares for War
Item #: NEW-0011995

Click image to enlarge
This lot consists of three receipts for military supplies made by Frank H McNairy who led the Tennessee Rangers, later to become the 1st Tennessee Cavalry Battalion.  Although Tennessee had not formally seceded from the union the sentiment in Nashville was pro-secession.  The first receipt is dated April 21 1861 made out to Captain McNairy (Tenn Rangers).  Purchases of what looks like flannel shirts but not sure about that.  Also some buttons.  The dealer was A Allison, T Anderson, Matt McClung and D A Allison.  The blue rag receipt is dated Nashville May 18, 1861 and reads Tennessee Rangers to M Singleton for hire of four horses 75 per horse $3.00  Received Payment M Singleton  Pencil notation at bottom reads Capt McNairy or Sgt Harris one got the horses and must be sent to them.   Finally a small receipt dated May 14th 1861 of E D Hicks for Tennessee Rangers Two 25/100 dollars for services as trumpeter.  

On May 30, 1861 McNairy led the Tennessee Rangers in a parade through the streets of Nashville.  McNairy had previously served as a lieutenant in Benjamin Cheatham's regiment during the Mexican War.  In June 1862 the Tennessee Rangers merged with the 7th Tennessee Cavalry (Bennett) to create the 2nd Tennessee Cavalry (Barteau).  McNairy resigned and declared that he would raise a partisan ranger union.  He was still attempting to recruit men when he was found dead after joining Wheeler who attacked the garrison at Dover, near Fort Donelson.   
 

Shipping Weight: 0.13 lb
Price: $157.50 USD
Email to a friend

2nd Tennessee Infantry-Recovering from Wound-George S Clark
Item #: NEW-0011888

Click image to enlarge

Returned to consignor

This is one of four letters from the four sons of a Nashville Tennessee family who had enlisted in the Civil War.  They were found in a ledger and had been preserved by a silking process which was an early preservation method.  Although it does preserve the item it presents as though you are reading it through onion skin paper.  It is not reversible as far as I know.  
There was a note accompanying the letters written by a family member indicating that the letters were from the four brothers and that there was also a fifth one who was also involved in the war. The notes indicate the full names but not the units they were in.  This information was determined by my research.

The following is a transcript of George S Clark whom I believe was in Co C 2nd Regiment Tennessee Infantry. (Robinson’s), (Walker Legion). The wound he is referring to in the letter is a wound in the hip at the Battle of Chickamauga.  He was taken to Atlanta in a wagon to the hospital.  After recovering from the wound he was found unfit for infantry service and subsequently secured a horse and joined General John Hunt Morgan's Cavalry and was with Morgan until his capture and was imprisoned at Columbus Ohio.     

                                                                           December 96, 1863

Dear Mother,
     As Henry has left me room for a PS I avail myself of it, with but faint hope however of its ever reaching you.  I have written to you frequently and to other members of the family and yet Henry tells me that none of my letters ever turned up.  You can imagine my surprise and delight last evening when Mr Bransford handed me Mary’s letter.  It is the first word I have heard from home or from Lizzie and my dear little fellows since last June.  I felt like kissing her photograph, which she enclosed to me, for affording me the only unmixed pleasure I have had in months.  I fear that you all have suffered unnecessary uneasiness on my account.  It is outrageous that a poor fellow cannot enjoy the luxury of a slight blood letting (referring to his wounds) without being reported dangerously or mortally wounded.  I am doing very well-hope to be able to report in a week or so-send this letter to Lizzie for fear she may not get the one I wrote her-with any love to her and my children and tell her to write to me by ? Monroe often.  I may get an occasional letter from her in that way.  Tell Mollie I will answer her letter soon that I shall preserve her deal face with jealous care.  I do wish that some of you would write regularly by flag of truce.  Closing  George S Clark. 


Shipping Weight: 0.13 lb
Price: $257.50 USD
Email to a friend

46th Ga-8th Ga Regiment-Promotion-Field Document
Item #: NEW-0011864

Click image to enlarge
This worn document (see scan) is a field promotion from the 46th Regiment of the Georgia National Guard.    The following is a transcript of the manuscript.

                                                                                                                                                                            Headquarters Georgia Militia   
                                                                                                                                                                            Clinton Jones Co.  May 17, 1862
                                                                                                                                                                             46th Regiment

Calvin Broch (Broach)                                                         Greeting




Possessing special trust and confidence in your patriotism valor conduct and fidelity do by all these present consent and appoint you 1st Lt. of the 361 District of the upper Battalion 46th Reg
And you are hereby required to do and perform all and ? Your duties as such obeying all ? Officers and you are to be obeyed and respected accordingly before proceeding ? And subscribe the following oath.

                                    Robert H Barron
                                    Col Commanding
                                    46th Regiment G N G (Ga National Guard)


                                  Oath

I Calvin Broach do solemnly sear that I will bear me faith and allegiance to the State of Georgia and to the utmost of my power and ability and observe conform to and support and defend the constitution thereof without any reservation or equivocation whatsoever and the constitution of the Confederate States.  

Sworn to and subscribed before me this 17th day of May 1862.

Roland F ? Ordinary                    Signed by Calvin Broach


Rare Confederate Field Promotion

Calvin Broach entered the war with the 8th Georgia Cavalry Batallion which were State Guards.  He evidently served with the 46th Regiment National Guard during his wartime service.  He did however end the war in the 8th Georgia Cavalry.    

 

Shipping Weight: 0.13 lb
Price: $257.50 USD
Email to a friend

8th Georgia Militia-End Of War Parole-Macon-Calvin Broach
Item #: NEW-0011862

Click image to enlarge
Very rare parole dated May 17, 1865 given to C Broach (Calvin) of the 8th Milita, Co. H. Parole was given by the Headquarters Cavalry Corps, M.D.M, (Military District of Mississippi.  By order of Maj General Wilson, who was the occupation officer of Macon.  Calvin Broach was a citizen of Jones County. Wear to the pardon as is usual since they were required to always have it on their person.  Folds, edge tears and some foxing.  See scan. 

Shipping Weight: 0.13 lb
Price: $557.50 USD
Email to a friend

1863 Confederate Slave Impressment-Alabama
Item #: NEW-0011570

Click image to enlarge
Rare Confederate imprint, which is not listed in Parrish or Crandall, is on blue rag paper which measures 8 by 5 inches. Excellent condition.  This a receipt by the Impressing Agent for Henry County Abbeville paying Mrs H M Bennett thirty nine dollars for the use of her slave for thirty nine days beginning on the 18th of December in 1862 to May 4th 1863 for the "Public Defenses on the Chattahoochee River".  One dollar a day.

By legislation passed October 31, 1862, the  Governor of Alabama was empowered to impress slaves, along with other types of property, for use in the public service against the enemy.   



Shipping Weight: 0.13 lb
Price: $257.50 USD
Email to a friend

Ft Boggs-Defense of Savannah Ga-Fall of Fort Pulaski-J R Bivins
Item #: NEW-0011439

Click image to enlarge
This letter is signed by J R Bivins.  Searching the Soldier Sailor system I found only one Bivins who was involved in the defense of Savannah.  His name was John Bivins, no middle initial indicated.  He was with the 12th Regiment Georgia Cavalry.  The cover that comes with the letter was not with this particular letter but was in the grouping of the soldier's papers  Ragged left edge and note that Bivins cut off the end of the paper.  Paper was very scarce doing the war and this was a common practice.

The letter is headed Fort Boggs, April 10th 1862.  I am transcribing the battle content and other meaningful content  of the letter. I've pretty much transcribed it with spelling and grammatical error intact..

"Lieut Daniel & Private ? was sent to the hospital yesterday evening they are quite sick.  Sidney Smith is complaining has been bad several days.  TheYankees has attacked Fort Pulaski  the firing commenced this morning about 8 o clock and is still going as we can hear the roar of the cannons but can't see any thing from this place  I have just returned from ? Bluff about two miles below here  I could see from this the smoke from the canons and see some of the shells burst some of them wold burst several hundred fet high some say that they cant take the fort 

Joseph E (probably Johnson)  is still here trying to get the soldiers to reinlist he now offers 30 days furlough & $50. I don't think he will get many they have not forgotten general jacksons laws refusing a friend to go home with the dead body of his friend  the governor tells us we can go home 30 days with $50 dollars and make our famileys comfortable & return to our post  he must think we are all fools fifty dollars would buy one hundred lbs of bacon and mabey ten bushels of corn  he says if we don't enlist we are cowards  it is now about two o clock the cannons is still to be heard  they are firing ? sundown  the firing still continues  it appears to be more frequent & heavens I am afrade the Fort will have to ? under it is hard that so many friends have to stand and  look on & can't help their friends.  I expect to start home on the 21st or 22 nd if I live to see that time you may have us all before that time if they don't I will let you know where to send to Milledgeville for the  canon still continues to rour in thunder ?  Closing J R Bivins. 


Shipping Weight: 0.13 lb
Price: $257.50 USD
Email to a friend

Andrew Johnson-Pardon-True Signature
Item #: NEW-0011405

Click image to enlarge
Paypal will not be accepted on this item although payment plans can be arranged.  

This wonderful document on vellum bears the personal signature of Andrew Johnson who was known to have used a stamp for many documents due to an injury to his hand.  This is not a stamped signature and I guarantee it's authenticity.  Some separations at the folds, the worst being near Johnson's signature which can be seen in the scan.  Large edge tears on the right edge with the document being folded back in two places.  

The pardon was issued to John Miller of Petersburg Virginia who "by taking part in the late rebellion against the Government of the United States" was pardoned on the twentieth-sixth day of June 1865. Note that the document does not contain the signature of Secretary of State Seward as usual as he was still recuperating from his assassination attempt wounds from April 14th. 

There are over 100 John Millers in Virginia Confederate Regiments.

Shipping Weight: 2.3 lbs
Price: $2,500.00 USD
Email to a friend

10th Texas Regiment Calvary-Battle of Murfreesboro-Confederate Letter
Item #: NEW-0010977

Click image to enlarge
This is a two page letter.  Wear to the folds with some holes, not affecting the content which mentions the fight at the second battle at Murfreesboro (Stones River) earlier and names soldiers who were killed or wounded.  Although he did not mention his unit it was easily discovered by research through the Soldier and Sailor system. I could read his letter easily except for some of the names which were a challenge probably due to his spelling or my inability to read old cursive styles.  Those names that I have a question mark after means I couldn't read or may have been misspelled.  I have left his writing pretty much as he wrote it.

                                                                  State of Tenn Shelbyville
                                                                   March 8 1863


Dear Brother  This morning I write you lines in answer to your letter which cam to hand yesterday dated Jan the 4  It gave me great satisfaction to hear from you before getting this letter  I did not know whether you was living or dead   I am sorry that we cannot be together though maby it is the best for us  We had a very hard fight at Murfreesboro the 31 day of December 7 wounded and one killed in our company Joel Reynolds killed  Thomas Dement wounded  Thomas Holloway ? William Waggoner and myself wounded  John Goodson and James Moncoss (?) missing  We drove the enemy back from the word go about 4 miles  halted staying there 4 days  The enemy reinforced and we fell back.  We expect a fight here before long.  General Van Doren captured a brigade of yanks yesterday and our infantry pickets were drove in by the enemy a few days a go.  Uncle Will  Wiley Ben Calodom ? John Vanger ? and myself are all in the same mess.  The boys send you there best respects  Uncle Will says he would like to see you  I have no more to write that would interest you and want you to write to me as often as you can and I will do the same.  Let’s try to live so that if we meet no more in this world we may meet where parting is no more  There is but a few who gamble in our Company  gambaling ? and swaring I don’t think I will ever do   I had better close for the present Write soon and often   

                                                                    J (James) W Scurlock
                                               To his Brother
                                                                      M V Scurlock 

James W. Scurlock was born 7 Dec 1839 in Jackson, Alabama and died 22 Mar 1896 in Cherokee Co., Tx.  He was married to 8 Mar 1874 in Cherokee Co., Tx. to Mattie E. Priestly (1854-1897) and they had a son William Scurlock (1875-1925).    He was a Private in Co. I, 10th Regiment, Texas Confederate Cavalry (Locke's).    He is buried in Jones Cemetery, County Road 1605,  Rusk, Tx. 


Here is a history of his very active Regiment::

Tenth Regiment  Texas Cavalry (Locke's)

10th Cavalry Regiment was organized with about 900 men during the late summer of 1861. Many of its members were recruited in the towns of Quitman and Tyler, and the counties of Upshur, Rusk, and Cherokee. For the first few months it served in Texas, Arkansas, and Louisiana, then was dismounted after crossing the Mississippi River. After fighting at Richmond, the unit was assigned to General Ector's Brigade in the Army of Tennessee. It participated in numerous battles from Murfreesboro to Atlanta, endured Hood's winter operations in Tennessee, and aided in the defense of Mobile. This regiment totalled 565 effectives during the spring of 1862 and lost thirty-four percent of the 350 engaged at Murfreesboro. Very few surrendered on May 4, 1865. The field officers were Colonels James M. Barton and W.D. Craig, and Majors Wiley B. Ector and Hulum D. E. Redwine.      





Shipping Weight: 0.13 lb
Price: $457.50 USD
Email to a friend

Additional Pages
1  2  [Next Page]
Catalog Updated
12/13/2017 2:54:00 PM
Harry S Truman for Judge-Eastern District Celluloid

$2,000.00

Copyright © 2017 TennRebGirl.com All rights reserved.
Site
Powered by Web-Cat Copyright © 1996-2017 GrayCat Systems