Civil War
Letters-Documents-Newspapers-Union
Military Pass-Provost Marshal's Office-Nashville
Item #: NEW-0016297

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Worn slip of paper allowing James Peacock, dated November 22nd 1864, The pass was to allow him to go 5 miles on any pike and return.  Citizens of Occupied Nashville were required to get a pass to move about the city. This pass was good for 60 days.  I did find a James Peacock who got in some trouble for smuggling, no doubt in this travels but I was unable to get the details.  This is a worn pass as can be seen in the scan.  There is a tear in the middle that runs almost half way and a small tear on the right hand side. Other condition problems that can be seen in the scan.

Shipping Weight: 0.13 lb
Price: $67.50 USD
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Civil War Letters-Cover-Written In German
Item #: NEW-0016235

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I found these letters and cover in an estate in Nashville.  One letter is dated August 10, 1863.  It was written from Louisville Kentucky legible only if you can read German.  There are some words in English-Clarksville (Tn), Cumberland, Union Landing, Fort Donelson.  The second letter is in the same hand but signed by Peter Em Studer and written to P F Tavel in Nashville.  The interesting cover mailed from Louisville on Dec 31, a clear cancel.  Stamp pasted on the cover, "United We Stand Divided we Fall". Advertised stamp. The second letter is on blue rag but has multiple tears on the folds. Three pages in German.    

This is what I found on P F Tavel or Paul F Tavel. Reference www2.lib.unc.edu/.
 Paul F. Tavel was probably a native of western Switzerland. He arrived in the United States in 1844. He was apparently interested in agriculture, particularly viticulture, and meteorology; he was also a bookbinder. The collection includes letters, account books, weather observation Records, and other items relating chiefly to Paul F. Tavel's vineyards in Stewart and Davidson counties, Tenn., and to other agricultural efforts and studies; meteorological observations of Tavel and a Mr. Flowers in Stewart County and in Nashville, Tenn.; and items relating to Tavel's bookbinding business. 

There were four Peter Studers in the Union reference base.  Here is the one that I think is most likely since this Unit fought in Tennessee.

Peter Studer

Residence was not listed; 
Enlisted on 9/3/1862 as a Private.

On 9/3/1862 he mustered into "I" Co. PA 75th Infantry 
He was discharged on 7/4/1865


Sources used by Historical Data Systems, Inc.:

 - History of Pennsylvania Volunteers, 1861-1865
(c) Historical Data Systems, Inc. @ www.civilwardata.com

Shipping Weight: 0.13 lb
Price: $42.50 USD
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17th Ohio Inf-Soldier Letter-Blood Soaked Item-Gen Zollicoffer
Item #: NEW-0016087

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No paypal on this item but payment plans can be arranged.

This is a soldier letter from the 17th Ohio Infantry.  The soldier was James T Parsons who enlisted as a private on 9/23/1861 as a private.  He was discharged for disability on 9/28/1862.  

The letter is a legal sized blue rag paper which continues on the back.  Folds, pinholes at the folds, but quite legible. My scanner cut off a small portion of the letter. 

Letter is headed Somerset Pulaski County, Kentucky, January 30th the 30th, 1862. 

Dear Parents,

I am well this morning notwithstanding it rained on me all last night.  We expected to leave here last week but have been waiting for new clothes & tents  they arrived last night our old tents were low inconvenient things and got to leaking   a man could not stand straight in them.  The new ones are good ones  We have the prisoners here yet and three Secesh Surgeons  they tend on their own wounded but we keep a guard at the hospital door  They are amputating yet  I seen them throwing arms and legs into the yard the other day  I am still well satisfied and contented  The saying that privates were mistreated by officers is a base falsehood  They treat us as equals  I have never seen an officer abuse a private yet and I have visited several regiments besides my own General Schoeff   He never passes any of us without speaking and giving his best bow while Major St Coland ? often pitch ? with the boys  It is now supposed that we will leave here next saturday and go 6 miles to a camp on the banks of the Cumberland River  The news now is that the rebels have evacuated the Cumberland Gap.  The payday should have been the 1st of this month but has not come yet.  I don’t see as I can do much for my payments in the spring  I don't know what I will do about it.  But I would rather sacrifice all than not serve my country.  (some family news which I've omitted)

I WILL SEND THE INCLOSED PIECE OF GENERAL ZOLLICOFFER'S BUCKSKIN GLOVE  THERE IS NO HUMBUG ABOUT THIS  I TOOK IT OFF HIS HAND MYSELF  IT IS STAINED WITH THE OLD REBELS BLOOD SO YOU MAY SEE SECESH BLOOD. THEY EMBALMED HIM  ONE OF THE REBEL SURGEONS IS RELEASED ON PAROLE TO TAKE THE COLD CORPSE HOME.  

Closes with some personal comments  then From your son James T Parsons  Israel & Hannah Parsons

Note at bottom:  Please hand this to father ? oblige J T Parsons

Included in the listing is a snippet of the glove that is smeared with blood.  The scan is larger than the item which is an inch and a half long.

See the following link which describes the death of General Felix Zollicoffer

http://www.millsprings.net/index.php/2013-10-01-18-24-22/death-of-gen-felix-k-zollicoffer

Here is a portion of this site.  The second paragraph relates the looting of his body that took place.

http://www.millsprings.net/index.php/2013-10-01-18-24-22/death-of-gen-felix-k-zollicoffer

Few aspects of the battle of Mill Springs are as surrounded by controversy as the death of Gen. Felix Kirk Zollicoffer, CSA.   Ignoring the embellishments and the whys-and-wherefores, what seems clear is that Zollicoffer mistook Union troops for his own units (quite understandable in the confusion of that dark misty morning), and he approached the Union lines by mistake. He wished to order them to cease firing on their own men, since he thought they were all Confederates. Whatever the cause, it is evident that Zollicoffer did not recognize the Union officer to whom he spoke as an enemy; neither did this officer recognize Zollicoffer as a Confederate. Or possibly, Zollicoffer did recognize the enemy and realized his mistake, and attempted to bluff his way out. Only as they parted, and one of Zollicoffer’s staff rode out of the woods to warn his commander (meanwhile firing at the Federals), did both parties realize the truth. In the ensuing exchange of fire, Zollicoffer was shot dead from his horse.

Controversy also surrounds the treatment of Zollicoffer’s body after his death. He fell in or near the Mill Springs Road, between the lines (but closer to the Federals). At some point his body was moved out of the road, to the vicinity of an oak tree nearby. After the Confederate retreat the body was recognized by Federal soldiers, and numerous period accounts attest that they immediately took souvenirs from the body: pieces of clothing, buttons, even locks of hair. This treatment was vehemently denied by some Northern newspaper accounts, but there can be no doubt that it happened. However, as soon as Federal officers arrived on the scene, the body was protected, and was later cleaned, embalmed, and treated with honor. Zollicoffer’s corpse was eventually allowed to pass through the lines for burial in Nashville. James T. Parsons

Note:  I have been unable to resolve the spelling of the two officers mentioned in this letter.

Residence was not listed; 26 years old.

Enlisted on 9/23/1861 as a Private.

On 9/23/1861 he mustered into "H" Co. OH 17th Infantry 
He was discharged for disability on 9/28/1862


Sources used by Historical Data Systems, Inc.:

 - Official Roster of the Soldiers of the State of Ohio
(c) Historical Data Systems, Inc. @ www.civilwardata.com




Shipping Weight: 2 lbs
Price: $3,500.00 USD
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24th Mass-William Hunt Goff-Deserter to be Hung
Item #: NEW-0015913

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The letter was written by Sgt William Hunt Goff 24th Massachusetts company H while he was at Deep Bottom Virginia. He was promoted to Corporal on the 3rd Sept 1864. William became the rank of Full Sergt. on the 1st March 1865. Letter comes with the  research of his war time activity and a cop of a  newspaper article and a photo of him. This is 2 in a series of letters by him, the other offered on my site separately. 
The letter is difficult to read and this is the best I could do.

Deep Bottom, Virginia

August 7th 1864 

Dear Sister 

It is Sunday afternoon and I have not to do at present so I will write you a short letter an answer for the one that I received from you the other morning there has been nothing new since I wrote my last nothing but the same thing over and over again we have not lost any men as we had been here what you saw in the papers was what happened ?  the four mile run tomorrow we have yet to witness or learn that have not before since we have been out and that is to see a man shot for deserting over to the Rebels. His name is Mackel Heney and he belongs to Company F of our regiment when we was in Newbern he was court-martialed and put in the new Bern jail from which he made his escape and went into the rebel lines and their joined one of their regiments and has fought us we since he said that he thought that we was in S.C. when he came in he wanted to know if there was any Mass regiment he they told him that there was the 26th just then one of the drummer boys of Company F came up and he knew him right away and called him by name he was tacking then down to the Gen Quarters and from there they took him down to Fortress Monroe where he had his try it and was sentenced to be shot tomorrow at 10 o’clock in presence of the troops.

We have get a Sulter now in our regiment this morning there was an order sent calling for 600  Men to vol from our Corps to work for 20 days digging earth in some place probably to mine some of the rebel workers in front of Grants unit the same members from the 18th Corps there is 10 going from Co D but I am not one of them they leave day after tomorrow and that they are to work seven hours and a half a day in our to get light tends an hour there were so you may hear before a great while of war rebel workers going up in the air I did not know when fast day was until yesterday so that I could not see it very well but I will wait until next year and then would do just as well I am looking forward to have a nothing good to eat when my back comes along was glad to hear that father cut so much hay this year that they say that it is better this year than usual I am well and in good health and so are all of the Attlebore boy I will write again soon so until then goodbye give my best regards to all the pretty girls so with love I remain yours truly.  Signed in light ink Wm ? Goff 

William H Goff

William H. Goff

Residence Attleboro MA; an 18 year-old Farmer.

Enlisted on 10/21/1861 as a Private.

On 10/23/1861 he mustered into "H" Co. MA 24th Infantry 
He Re-enlisted on 1/4/1864
He was Mustered Out on 1/20/1866 at Richmond, VA


Promotions:
* Corpl 9/3/1864 
* Sergt 3/1/1865 


Other Information:
born in Rehobeth, MA
Member of GAR Post # 145 (William A. Streeter) in Attleborough, MA
Held GAR Offices:
* Post Commander # 145
died 4/2/1916

Sources used by Historical Data Systems, Inc.:

 - Massachusetts Soldiers, Sailors and Marines in the Civil War
 - Photo courtesy of Massachusetts Commandery of MOLLUS
 - GAR Dept of Massachusetts 1866-1947 (Sargent)
(c) Historical Data Systems, Inc. @ www.civilwardata.com



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Price: $157.50 USD
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Libby Prison Guard Letter-Dick Turner's Escape
Item #: NEW-0015887

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Sorry for the cutoff scans due to the legal sized letter (12 1/2 by 8) written by Sgt William Hunt Goff 24th Massachusetts company H while he was a guard at Libby Prison.William became the rank of Full Sergt. on the 1st March 1865.  This is a four page letter.  I have only shown what I could of the first page which has you can see is fairly able to read, although there are some rough spots.  The second scan shown the accounting of the escape of Dick Turner and some of it is impossible to read. See end of listing for more on Dick Turner.


Note:  This was one of four letters offered by a eBay seller, who has provided information about Goff.  The signature on the bottom is too hard to read, though you can see the ff 


Richmond Virginia

May 11th 1865

 

Dear sister

 

You may think it strange that I have not writing to you before in fact I received one or two letters from you about a week ago and have tried to answer them once or twice before but could not call my thoughts together so I let them go until the present time and as I am on guard at Libby today I can take part of the night to write this letter in since writing my last we have had two or three grand military displays the first was on the fifth of this month when the second and fifth Army Corp. of the Army of the Potomac passed in (?) Through the city it was a grand site and they was five hours and a half pairing a giving point it made a good money of the southern people open their eyes some to see some of the powers of Uncle Sam yesterday we had the pleasure of seeing Gen. Sherman Army passed through while today the 19th and 20th Corps of Gen. Sherman Army poured through and tomorrow the 15th and 17th Corps of the same Army per through any will not have many set chances in his life time to see - many troops in so that a time they camp the Army a mile or two outside of Manchester for a few days before marching them through the city so all to give a good many a chance to come across the river and take a stroll over Libby and other places for a good many of them have been in Libby prison sometime during the war and they like to take back at the place before they go north all of the armies have marched by both Castle thunder and Libby prison both places here yet large many hung and so that all can see them has been large crowds here for the last week or so and whoever is on guard at the prison here all that he can do showing them and their here been a good many from the north today and I have heard to play the ayre able to them they all want to take away with them something to show their friends Their prisoners at the North and I remember the place by such a piece of a brick or would or a nail or something of that kind.  We have had a pretty hard thunder pretty hard but under showers tonight the first of many account that we have had this spring I see in the paper the other night that the Army of the ? was to remain in Virginia per the present to do some provost duty and one thing and another I do not think that I shall get a choice to get here much before full allotment we cannot tell you tell me that I must mind and sparing of my money will I go that I shall be I did not have  but five dollars when I came in the city and that was ? so I do not think that I shall spend much more for the present and they say that we are not going to have any more pay at the present.

 

I receive mothers and grandma pictures the other day and I think that they are first rate ? we have not got there notes that I wrote you about some time ago and there is order not to send any more clothing so that we shall not have (?) Get M of the rest of the pickings and are looking gay.

 

May 12th 

 

Dick Turner made his escape from the prison last night we did not find it out  till this morning at night ( HARD TO READ LINE)  through it rather strange that he did not hear any one the(?) And when he comes to look and he found it empty. He had removed one of the bars of the window that looked out from the cell one to the street was taken out he had made his way out up onto the street the (?) That was taking out we found to be nothing but would and at (?) And all that he was waiting for was a dark and rainy night and last night was the first the time I hear that they have offered a reward of 1000 to any one that will take him I am well and in good health with love yours truly 

Will

Regarding the escape of Dick Turner 

Memorable Incident in the Life of R. R. Turner,

A LIBBY PRISON OFFICIAL.

Mistaken for the Commandant, He Was About to Be Court-martialed.

Escaped from the Guards After Being Given the Enclosure, and Managed to Reach the House of a Friend - Opportunity Presenting Itself, He Slipped Away from Richmond - Died Last Week.

The death of Mr. R. R. Turner, which occurred in Isle of Wight county on Thursday, recalls a memorable incident in his life, which took place in Richmond some thirty-five years ago.

During the civil war, and at its close, Mr. Turner was commissary of the famous Libby Prison, in this city, where a large number of Union prisoners of war were confined. The commandant of the prison was his cousin, Captain Thomas Turner. By his rigid discipline, which was absolutely necessary under the circumstances, Captain Turner naturally incurred the ill-will of the men in his keeping, who charged him with cruelty and freely circulated this report among their northern relatives and friends.

As a matter of fact, the inmates of Libby prison received better treatment than Confederate prisoners in northern prisons. The rations may at times have been scanty, but in this they fared as well as the Confederate soldiers who were guarding them, receiving exactly the same amount and quality of food.

When Richmond was evacuated, and the Union troops came in, one of the first men they searched for was Captain Thomas Turner. The report that he had been the commandant of the famous Libby prison had gone all over the North. Fortunately, Captain Turner had left the city.

WRONG MAN ARRESTED.

His cousin, Mr. R. R. Turner, was found, however, and the fact that in appearance, he was like his relative; that he had been at Libby prison and that he was certainly named Turner, led to his being mistaken for Captain Thomas Turner. He was placed in the State penitentiary to be tried by court-martial. With feeling running high, as it did in the days following the evacuation, courts-martial did not make nice distinctions in matters of identity. Captain Wirz, the commandant of the Andersonville prison, was arrested about the same time, and executed, after having been court-martialed upon the same charge as that preferred against Mr. R. R. Turner.

Turner’s chances were small indeed. With friends and acquaintances scattered, it was practically impossible for him to at once establish that he was not the Turner wanted. No delay would have been granted him. There was no such thing as appeal to the civil courts. The military authority was supreme and in full control. He had no friends in positions of influence.

MADE HIS ESCAPE.

For some reason, probably because of the large number of duties devolving upon the recently installed local military authorities, the court-martial was not held for several days. Mr. Turner had been in prison about eight or ten days, when, being given the privilege of the grounds within its walls, he escaped, and made his way to the residence of Mr. John Tyree, a friend, at the corner of Monroe and Marshall streets, where he was concealed for a week or two.

Mr. Tyree, a few weeks later, slipped him out of the lower end of the city. Being well acquainted with all the roads leading from the city, he soon made his way through the country to the home of his relatives and friends in Isle of Wight, where he remained until the excitement incident to the affair had died out.

It is asserted as an undeniable fact by those who were acquainted with the circumstances that so great was Mr. Turner’s anxiety concerning the position in which he was placed, that the color of his hair changed from a raven-black into gray in one night.

This is the link: Turner: http://www.civilwarrichmond.com/written-accounts/newspapers/richmond-dispatch/2299-1901-12-08-richmond-dispatch-description-of-the-escape-of-richard-r-dick-turner-from-libby-prison-after-the-close-of-the-war-includes-engraving-of-turner

William H. Goff


Residence Attleboro MA; an 18 year-old Farmer.


Enlisted on 10/21/1861 as a Private.


On 10/23/1861 he mustered into "H" Co. MA 24th Infantry 

He Re-enlisted on 1/4/1864

He was Mustered Out on 1/20/1866 at Richmond, VA



Promotions:

* Corpl 9/3/1864 

* Sergt 3/1/1865 



Other Information:

born in Rehobeth, MA

Member of GAR Post # 145 (William A. Streeter) in Attleborough, MA

Held GAR Offices:

* Post Commander # 145

died 4/2/1916


Sources used by Historical Data Systems, Inc.:


 - Massachusetts Soldiers, Sailors and Marines in the Civil War

 - Photo courtesy of Massachusetts Commandery of MOLLUS

 - GAR Dept of Massachusetts 1866-1947 (Sargent)

(c) Historical Data Systems, Inc. @ www.civilwardata.com



Shipping Weight: 0.13 lb
Price: $325.50 USD
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30th Maryland Colored Soldier Discharge-Bounty Forms
Item #: NEW-0015323

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This lot consists of four items relating to Fletcher Houston, a free black man who enlisted in the Civil War in the State of Maryland.  The first form is one I have never seen before, which is essentially vouching that he was a free man, born of free parents at the time of his enlistment.  Two white citizens by the name of John Cameron and Alfred Kirk are attesting that they have known Fletcher Houston, "a colored soldier, enlisted in Company C 30th regiment UP S Colored Troops” Evidently this form was necessary for him to receive his end of the war bounty.

The second form which is attached to the first form is from the City Register’s Office in Baltimore, dated December 28th, 1865, indicating that Houston had received his cash bounty and monthly installments for fifty dollars. Note the hole in the bottom.

The third form is another form, attached to the others is dated January 5th, 1866 directing Thomas Timmons to pay Houston fifty dollars.  There is a revenue stamp and Fletcher Huston’s mark X.  I’m not sure I understand this form since it is after the receipt but perhaps it was for another payment.  

The last form is Fletcher Houston’s discharge form the State of Maryland.  This form is in poor condition with large tears.  I will repair these with archival tape if the buyer desires.  The discharge is longer than the scan.

Shipping Weight: 2 lbs
Price: $725.50 USD
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Camp Parapet-1864 Letter-Capt E Goddard-12th Maine Regt
Item #: NEW-0015271

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This is a one page legible, but light writing.  Captain E F Goddard is writing to the father of a dead soldier, The cover has a very clear cancel from New Orleans and a bulls-eye cancel on the stamp. There is a one inch tear at the top right fold.

                                                                              Camp Parapet La
                                                                                               Jan 8, 1864

Mr Kimball,

      Sir, It becomes my duty to write you a few lines in relation to your late son George W Kimball as I think a Copy of his Final Statement will aid you in the settlement of his account with the government.  he had as you will see by the copy I sent you (4) four months & 12 days due him  at the time of his death he also had 36 dollars in his possession which I sent to his brother Charles as his brother ? Groves as he said it was his request.

He was a good soldier and stood high in the estimation of his officers and comrades, both as a man and a soldier.  I fully sympathize with you in your misfortune any information I can give you in regard to settling his account will be respectfully given.  
                                                                               Signed by E Goddard, Capt. 12th Regiment
                                                                                                                    Maine Volunteers.

George W. Kimball

Residence Albany ME; 24 years old.

Enlisted on 11/15/1861 as a Private.

On 11/15/1861 he mustered into "A" Co. ME 12th Infantry 
He died on 11/13/1863
 (Died in hospl)


Sources used by Historical Data Systems, Inc.:

 - Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Maine
(c) Historical Data Systems, Inc. @ www.civilwardata.com

Elisha F. Goddard

Residence Rumford ME; 23 years old.

Enlisted on 11/15/1861 as a 2nd Lieutenant.

On 11/15/1861 he was commissioned into "A" Co. ME 12th Infantry 
He was Mustered Out on 4/18/1866


He was listed as:
* Detailed (date and place not stated) (1865)


Promotions:
* 1st Lieut (1863)
* Capt (1863)


Sources used by Historical Data Systems, Inc.:

 - Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Maine
(c) Historical Data Systems, Inc. @ www.civilwardata.com

Shipping Weight: 0.13 lb
Price: $77.50 USD
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2nd Ky Regt-Union Soldier Letter-Interesting Content
Item #: NEW-0015124

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This is a four page letter just full of information.  The cover helps to identify the "George" who wrote the letter.  Co D 2nd Ky Regiment fits George L Thomas whose history can be found at the bottom of this listing.  The letter was written to his father, William R Thomas who worked at the Eagle Iron Works in Cincinnati Ohio.  I can't quite read the cancel.

You will see in the scans of the middle that it has been repaired with what I recognize is an old archival tape which was used years ago.

The letter begins with

                                                             Louisville Ky Feb 28,63

Dear Parents,     

We landed here this morning about 2 o’clock and were immediately marched to the Barracks from which place I am now writing.  The trip by ‘Deck passage’ was more pleasant than I anticipated.  There were eleven " Deserters” in the squad.  All of them were hand cuffed when we started from the city (Cincinnati) but got the shackles off before reaching this place, but they did not put the Corporal to much trouble.  The sight of sharp bayonets and loaded guns in the hands of the guard seemed to have a very soothing effect on them when they became anyways refractory.  I have heard of persons ’sleeping sweetly’ but I have never experience such a thing until last night, and I shall leave you to judge if I should not of slept sweetly, as I was huddled up on some ’Golden syrup’ with my back braced against the cylinder of one of the large engines, where I spent a very comfortable night as I did not suffer from the cold a bit.  "The Barracks” is an old furniture warehouse with bunks fixed on one side of each room.  It is capable of sleeping about 600 men.  They have just finished scrubbing the floors, and there is a good fire to sit by, and take it all together it is about as pleasant here as it can well be made.  I expect to go to Nashville in the morning.  In the mean time I will lay aside my pen and take a stroll through the City, take a few notes and see if I can find that ’high moral tone’  which pervades all places which are blessed with the institution of slavery.

letter continues


                                                     Camp at Cripple Creek
                                                     8 miles from Murfreesboro

I quit writing on Saturday expecting to take a stroll about Louisville but I was disappointed as they would not let me out 
On Sunday morning early we were started for Nashville which place we reached without accident or much worthy of notice the track of army can be traced everywhere no fences around the field’s dead horses and mules broken wagons meet the eye at most every turn.  The prettiest places on the road that I saw were Franklin Ky and Gallatin Tenn both places seem to be in a flourishing condition.  We passed through four tunnels over any amount of bridges.  The one over the Cumberland River is a splendid structure it has a span of about one half of a mile.  I saw the remains of the cars that the rebs destroyed on last Thursday.  The battle field of "Stone River” presents a sorry aspect Dead horses
And mules are plenty trees shattered by the shot and shell and the remains of burnt wagons and cars on each side of the R.R. for a distance of some miles.  I forgot to say that we stayed in Nashville, all of Sunday night in an unfinished building intended for a hotel and built by Zollicoffer & Co, it will be a splendid building if every finished.  Murfreesboro is a terrible muddy place yet clean Enough for the Rebs who live there, from the latter place to this camp I came in a stiff wagon saw John walking around and knew him and called him  he was somewhat surprised to see me.  The boys are all in a healthy condition some if not all are homesick, the damp is situated in a cedar grove it is very muddy chilly at nights but pleasant in the day.  Closing remarks  your son George


                                                             Louisville Ky Feb 28,63

Dear Parents,     

We landed here this morning about 2 o’clock and were immediately marched to the Barracks from which place I am now writing.  The trip by ‘Deck passage’ was more pleasant than I anticipated.  There were eleven " Deserters” in the squad.  All of them were hand cuffed when we started from the city (Cincinnati) but got the shackles off before reaching this place, but they did not put the Corporal to much trouble.  The sight of sharp bayonets and loaded guns in the hands of the guard seemed to have a very soothing effect on them when they became anyways refractory.  I have heard of persons ’sleeping sweetly’ but I have never experience such a thing until last night, and I shall leave you to judge if I should not of slept sweetly, as I was huddled up on some ’Golden syrup’ with my back braced against the cylinder of one of the large engines, where I spent a very comfortable night as I did not suffer from the cold a bit.  "The Barracks” is an old furniture warehouse with bunks fixed on one side of each room.  It is capable of sleeping about 600 men.  They have just finished scrubbing the floors, and there is a good fire to sit by, and take it all together it is about as pleasant here as it can well be made.  I expect to go to Nashville in the morning.  In the mean time I will lay aside my pen and take a stroll through the City, take a few notes and see if I can find that ’high moral tone’  which pervades all places which are blessed with the institution of slavery.

George L. Thomas

Residence was not listed; 
Enlisted on 5/17/1861 at Pendleton, OH as a Private.

On 6/11/1861 he mustered into "D" Co. KY 2nd Infantry 
He was discharged for disability on 3/12/1862 at Cripple Creek, TN

Note:  Clearly this soldier re-upped but that history is lost.


Sources used by Historical Data Systems, Inc.:

 - Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Kentucky
(c) Historical Data Systems, Inc. @ www.civilwardata.com; 


Shipping Weight: 0.13 lb
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22 Illinois Infantry-Soldier Letter-Died of Wounds-Stones River
Item #: NEW-0014794

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This letter consists of two sides of legal sized paper.  It is legible other than his punctuation.  I have determined through research that the writer, William H Davis died as a result of wounds from the battle at Stones River.  There is also the cover written to his father and postmarked from Cairo.  I have concluded that the writer was with the 22nd Infantry  as there was a William H Davis under Col Henry Dougherty's command.  Davis explains in the letter why his Regiment did not accompany the others to the battle at Fort Henry, a few days away from the time the letter was written. 

                                                                                  Camp Lyons Feb 4th 1862

Dear Father,

Opening remarks...

He mentions a Leathers who has gone home and that he thinks he will have a better chance to get well. "We have just learned from General Halleck that the order in regard to furlongs did not apply to sick soldiers and that they can get a leave of absence or a surgeon’s certificate.”

"There has been a move up the Ohio River. Three Regiments have grouped here and one battery of artillery and several from Camp Holt and Cairo 14 steamboat loads in all.  they are going up the Ohio to the mouth of the Cumberland River and up that to the Tenn line to Fort Henry  they may have a fight up there  We were ordered to go but the order was countermanded on account of our tents being bad  General Grant says that he is not going to move us anymore until Col Dougherty is able to go with us which will not be for some time  he is getting along very well he is able to walk on crutches he has engaged a cork leg there was a man here the other day to measure him for one, the Col says he is going to stay with the Regiment as long as he has a leg or am.  He lost his leg trying to save the 7th Iowa regt.  He had got to the boat and the Iowans were behind  He knew that a great many of their officers were killed and unless they were rallied they would be killed or taken prisoners.  He made up his mind to save them or die in the attempt.  He was wounded in three places and his horse was shot.  There is nothing going on at the point.  We have got a few prisoners old Bird among the rest  the white Birds are under arrest but the black birds are at liberty  The weather is quite wintery for this place there is snow on the ground or rather ice  I was on guard at a bridge near Charleston from the night of the 28th to the night of the 30th it rained all of the first night and was so warm that we heard the frogs singing but it turned cold before morning and began to snow in the evening   We had no shelter from the storm and nothing to sleep on, it was pretty hard but it did not make me sick.  I wrote to Alfred and advised him to send his money home.  I think that Genl Grant is taking the right course and he is the man to put it through  I would like to be with him if I had a good horse.  Geo seems to be very much dissatisfied with his Captain and with the camp.  He talks of going into the Gunboat service but I would not advise him to do it.  I don’t think he will like it  It would suit me well because I am used to the water.  I am in hopes this war will be over before next winter so that we can all go home.  The Miss River is full of ice but none in the Ohio.  Closing remarks Wm H Davis. 

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15th Ohio Infantry-H Company Lt-J A Gleason to J R Updegrove
Item #: NEW-0014658

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This is a four page letter on legal sized paper, easily readable.  It is a letter from Captain J Alonzo Gleason -H Company-15th Ohio Infantry to Captain Joseph R Updegrove (determined by my research).   I have spent a great deal of time researching this letter but I consider it an incomplete project.  I have shown a scan of the front and last page.  The last page is stained and is the only page like that.

Updegrove had been wounded at Chickamauga and Pickett’s Mills.  Neither J R Updegrove nor J A Gleason is listed as being in  the 15th Ohio- H Company with the Civil War data system but I did find references to Captain Joseph R Updegrove  and J A Gleason on other sites.  Updegrove was wounded at Chickamauga & Pickett’s Mills.   
  
 I will provide a complete transcript of the letter but for purpose of brevity will only provide the most interesting content in this listing.

Camp near Bulls Gap Tenn
Saturday evening April 1, 1865

Captain J R,

(Gleason had been left with incomplete muster rolls and missing funds from the company and he is seeking assistance from Updegrove since the requests from Headquarters were persistent.  He also is sending Updegrove some of the personal papers left behind that he thought he might want.    

"I suppose you have heard of the "ax-eye-dent I met with at Camp Green near Huntsville Ala while butting off the end of a log preparatory to splitting it into planks for winter quarters, the ax glanced? And the consequences was that in about 10 or 15 minutes afterward Dr. Clark was employed to stitch up a right smart hole (over 2 inches long) in my shin--Receiving a new commission shortly after and being assigned to the H and Welker, also being promoted and made Q M-- left me the only officer in the Co.  Otherwise, I should have applied for a leave of absence."....  

"I received from  J N Alexander Esq. about a week ago, a paper for the Col. to sign to enable you to draw a pension.  I presume you have got it before this will reach you and hope you will be successful in your application.  Are you still Deputy Pro Marshal? Frank Armstrong is with us again, has returned a few days ago.  His foot is soundly healed and health in other respects good.  He was assigned to "H” as 2nd Lt. the day he returned & is waiting muster.  We arrived here on the 31st having left New Market on the 29th.  Had a muddy march.  We are gradually advancing along the line of railroad as fast as it can be repaired.  There was rather a bold exploit planned and nearly executed last night by a small party of bushwhackers.    (N. B. commenced this last evening and today is Sunday)  There were 4 of them who made an attempt to steal the horses belonging to Division Head Quarters having passed the pickets without trouble.  But the guard at the stable was too vigilant for them and hearing the noise approached to see what was going on among the horses when they fired on him wounding him severely in one leg and arm not being over 500 yards distant I was awakened by the shots and heard the wounded yell afterwards with all his might and then all was quiet this morning one of the boys of Co. I being down along the brook looking for a horse that had got loose  heard some one crying for help from a clump of bushes and found that it was a wounded rebel.  He was hit in the leg, which was broken and said it was done accidentally by one of his own party.  Claimed to be a deserter from the rebel army but admitted that they were trying to steal horses from the General’s stable.  He said that the Dutchman who was a guard after they had wounded him made a furious attack on the with his bayonet and they though best to retreat without the horses.  After he was carried to the ambulance the boy who found him discovered near the place where he lay, some papers with he had tried to conceal by burying them.  These showed him to be Lt. Carter of the 2 Tennessee rebel Cavalry and that he was detailed on special duty to procure horses from their dismounted men.  His leg will be amputated I understand.  We are in quite a mountainous district here at the head of what is called New Market Valley which extends from here to Strawberry Plains.

Can you give me any information in regard to Will Conn (William M Conn)-John Roop or Abraham Stauffer (wounded-discharged)?  And have you learned anything reliable about those men who were missing at Chickamauga to Pickett Mills Ga. W W Martin, Stanton (Daniel Stanton-Wounded at Chickamauga), Thompson (Hugh? Wounded at Chickamauga)), Webber (Samuel F Webber-Wounded -Missing Chickamauga), Butts (Enoch H. Butts killed at Pickett‘s Mills), Hamilton (Simon Hamilton-Captured-Exchanged), Edson (Emery S Edson-missing), Wm Lewis and Wortman (James Wortman (captured)?  Any information of this kind would be thankfully received. What do you think of the signs of the times?  Well I guess it will keep you busy to answer all the questions I have propounded.  Must close.  Respects and best wished  to Mrs.  ? And the boy.  

Signed J A Gleason 

http://books.google.com/books?id=Kd8yAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA320&lpg=PA320&dq=%22joseph+R+Updegrove%22&source=bl&ots=DMJ8YhLitY&sig=CjxZlkX6jJuJzcrQgAUHwg_d4QY&hl=en&sa=X&ei=NnV2U_vnDdPGoATqm4GoCQ&ved=0CE0Q6AEwBQ#v=onepage&q=%22joseph%20R%20Updegrove%22&f=false





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Documents-Citizen Asks for Reimbursement for Supplies Seized
Item #: NEW-0014642

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This lot includes thirteen items relating to a citizen of Cleveland Tennessee, whose property was taken, without payment during the Union Army's occupation of Cleveland. William Cate had two sons, one of whom fought in the Confederate Army and another who was with a Union Regiment.  There were receipts given in every case, jotted down on mostly scraps of paper, some with just a few items and in other cases taking up both the front and back. Cate put his case at the end of the war with a government agent or someone posing as a government agent who absconded with the money.  Cate then was faced with the difficulties of proving his case.  It seems it was a very lengthy process but he finally received reimbursement.

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Wisconsin-3rd Infantry Soldier Letter-KIA-Describes Hanging
Item #: NEW-0014401

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This is a four page, mostly legible letter on note paper. He didn't like periods and I corrected just a few of his spelling.  It is headed Camp Brownlow, Fredrick, Md. and dated January 69th 1862.  The soldier is writing his sister.  He begins by saying that he has been too sick to eat and that many of the soldiers were also sick.  Here is some of the camp content. "Our Col has been appointed Provost Martial of the City and our Regiment provost guard   we have three companies out on guard each day.  General Banks whole division is camped within a few miles of town  We are the only regiment camped in town   they have built us barricks our post is 60 feet long and 24 wide  we have good ...? we are very comfortable situated but I cannot tell how soon we will have to leave   Our regiment is under marching orders at present  we got orders yesterday  having to have two days rations cooked and ready to march immediately  the whole division is on a ?  I do not think we will go for a few days but I think by the looks of things we will move into Virginia pretty soon  snow fall about three inches deep last night  the first we have had of any accumulation  I do not like the idea of marching yet we have plenty to do here guarding the prisoners  there was a soldier hung here on the Monday before Christmas for shooting his major of the 46th Pa Regt. a scene I never witnessed before nor never wish to again  he was hung 3 1/2 miles from town  our Reft was the guard and escort there was 3 regts on the ground   I can hardly get time to write this  I have to stop every five minutes to write passes for the boys  as they are not allowed to go to town without a pass signed by the Capt and Sgt."  The rest are closing remarks and the letter is signed by J W Hunter  

His record indicates that he attained the rank of Captain and that he died from wounds on 6/8/1864 of wounds he received at Chattanooga. 

James W. Hunter

Residence Monroe WI; 
Enlisted on 4/19/1861 as a Private.

On 4/19/1861 he mustered into "C" Co. WI 3rd Infantry 
He died of wounds on 6/8/1864 at Chattanooga, TN


He was listed as:
* Wounded 5/25/1864 Dallas, GA


Promotions:
* 1st Sergt 
* 2nd Lieut 5/4/1862 (As of Co. A)
* Capt 5/12/1863 (As of Co. F)


Intra Regimental Company Transfers:
* 5/4/1862 from company C to company A 
* 5/12/1863 from company A to company F 


Sources used by Historical Data Systems, Inc.:

 - Roster of Wisconsin Volunteers:  War of the Rebellion
(c) Historical Data Systems, Inc. @ www.civilwardata.com
 


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1864-Bounty Payment-Dead Soldier-21st Ill Inf-Levi McDowell
Item #: NEW-0014395

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Official form from the Treasury Department for a bounty that was paid to Eliza McDowell for the death of her husband. The payment was for 113.00, a rather paltry sum for the death of a soldier.  There is a two inch tear at the right top fold and some holes where is was stapled or attached in some way.  The first scan does not show the entire form.

Levi McDowell

Residence Newman IL; 
Enlisted on 6/14/1861 as a Private.

On 6/28/1861 he mustered into "D" Co. IL 21st Infantry 
He died on 8/1/1863


Sources used by Historical Data Systems, Inc.:

 - Illinois: Roster of Officers and Enlisted Men
(c) Historical Data Systems, Inc. @ www.civilwardata.com

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23rd Indiana Regiment-1863 Soldier Letter
Item #: NEW-0014194

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Two page letter on small note paper.  Condition is poor as can be seen in the scan.  The letter was folded up in the cover and evidently was missed as the acidic burns indicate that it has been in the envelope for over 100 years.  The letter is headed Camp near Danville, Ky, Company K, 23rd Regt Ind Vol, January 16,1863.  The letter is addressed to his sister.  The letter is completely personal mentioning only that he did not go to some races being run, preferring to stay in the camp. I could not find this soldier listed so his future is unclear.

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1864 Union General Order-Military Division of Mississippi
Item #: NEW-0014144

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Field press notice, General Order, No 2 dated February 2nd 1864 (corrected).  Announces the appointment of Lieutenant-Colonel James H Stokes as Inspector of the Quartermaster's Department of the Military Division of the Mississippi. Other content.

Measures 8 by 5 inches

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133rd Ohio Inf-Letter-Cover Fancy Cancel-Old Point Comfort Fort
Item #: NEW-0013637

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Four page letter dated July 7th 1864 from William O Guitner who was with the 133rd.  The letter was addressed to his brother whom he thought lived in Westerville Ohio which was forwarded.  Cancel from Greencastle Pa with a due 3 notation.  Fancy cancel which I have never seen before. 

Guitner describes movements and criticizes his Col.  Gustavus Innis.  Pencil handwriting and hard to read in places  I’ve done the best I could.

Fort Powhatan, Dear Brother

"We had been ordered to the White House but it was countermanded and went directly to Bermuda hundred from Washington; from thence to Point Rocks on the Appomattox river.  We had been ordered here thirty six hours before we came.  Had we have left Point of Rocks when ordered we would have gotten into "that brush”…”

"We are still staying at the fort. Day after tomorrow it will be three weeks we arrived here.  I suppose we will stay here until the first of August then break for Ohio.  The rebs are in possession of Martinsburg I hear.  If we were at New Creek now we would be rushed into the fight I suppose.  We surely ought to keep that railroad open…We cannot go home the way we came unless the rebs are? And the railroad are built…Col Innis is commander of the post here.  The old fellow gives us no confidence.  They almost down on him.  On the 4th we were to have a review at half past six in the morning.  After review was over he told Col Ewing to "put” em through a couple of battalion moves.  After the Lt Col gave a few commands, he took command and deployed columns as usual.  And kept us all in the dust and until after the time for guard? 8’oclock.  Most of the guards were out on reviews.  He has now ordered squad company and battalion drill every day…more.

OHIO 
ONE HUNDRED and THIRTY-THIRD INFANTRY 
(Three Years) 

     One Hundred and Thirty-third Infantry. - Col., Gustavus S. Innis; Lieut.-Col., William Ewing; Maj., Joseph M. Clark.  This 
regiment was organized at Camp Chase, May 6, 1864, to serve for 100 days.  It was composed of two companies of the 58th Battalion
The regiment was immediately ordered to Parkersburg,  W. Va., where it arrived on May 8.  From this place it was ordered to New Creek
 thence to Washington, D. C., and on June 7 was ordered to Bermuda Hundred, where it arrived on June 12.  On June 16 the brigade to which
 it was assigned was ordered to destroy the Richmond & Petersburg railroad.  The regiment was assigned to the support of a battery, which 
opened a cannonade on the enemy and then with other troops, succeeded in holding the Confederates in check for 5 hours.  On July 17
 it embarked at Point of Rocks and proceeded to Fort Powhatan, where it was employed on work on the fortifications and in repairing
telegraph lines.  On Aug. 10 it proceeded to Washington, thence to Camp Chase, where it was mustered out on Aug. 20, 1864. 

William O. Guitner

Residence was not listed; 19 years old.

Enlisted on 5/2/1864 as a Corporal.

On 5/6/1864 he mustered into "C" Co. OH 133rd Infantry 
He was Mustered Out on 8/20/1864 at Camp Chase, OH


Sources used by Historical Data Systems, Inc.:

 - Official Roster of the Soldiers of the State of Ohio
(c) Historical Data Systems, Inc. @ www.civilwardata.com





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4th Division-Army of Central Kentucky-Soldier Letter
Item #: NEW-0013251

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Four pages on short note paper and a cover canceled from Stanford Kentucky.  Cover has separated and the letter has a tear to the mid fold on the second page.  There are other small separations at the fold.  The letter is headed Camp 2? Ohio Volunteer, Somerset Kentucky, May 23rd 63 (I think)

Ernest which is the only name signed was clearly a literate man and his writing in the body of the letter is legible.  He speaks of an interesting "wind cave with nice geological formations.  He speaks of his brother who is in a different regiment and how his brother survived well in a recent battle with the 8th OV.  He closes the letter, "We are now in the 1st Cavalry Brigade of the 4th Division of the Army of Central Kentucky.  Our Brigade is commanded by Col Kantz, our Division by General Carter, both of whom are noble men."  Signed Ernest.  My detective work has failed me on trying to learn his full name.

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Sixth Regiment Infantry Minnesota Volunteers-Mailed Cover
Item #: NEW-0013219

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Addressed to John Watson in Red Wing Goodhue County Minnesota.  I can read the Min on the cancel but that's all.  See scan to view the wear.  Clean back.  

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9th Michigan Inf Soldier letters-Nathan Bedford Forrest Raid-More
Item #: NEW-0013162

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This lot consists of five letters written by James H Smails who enrolled in the beginning of the war as a Sgt with the 9th Michigan Infantry, G Company.  At some point he later had service with the U S Army 11th Infantry. I will begin with the most important letter (though it is out of order) in which he describes the furious surprise raid of Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest during the first Battle of Murfreesboro.   

The letter is four pages, possibly incomplete.  It is written from Camp Chase in Columbus Ohio, dated July 31st with no year but would be 1862.  It is written to Jennie Livingston from Saline Michigan who was his cousin.  I am skipping the personal content. I have scanned only one page. There is wear to the mid folds with one small and one larger hole.

.."You will be anxious to hear from me as you have probably seen my name on the list of the wounded. I am getting along fne and expect to be in Michigan in a few weeks.  I was wounded in the early part of the engagement .  The ball striking me in the left side and passing through to the right side where it lodged and was afterwards cut out.

We were completely surprised about day light on the morning of July 13th by three thousand five hundred cavalry under command of the Rebel General Forrest of Georgia. part of our Regiment being on detached service there were five companys (250 men) in camp.  The 3rd Minnesota Regt was encamped on the other side of town nearly 200 miles distant and they could render us little assistance, the attack was first made upon our camp  they came upon us before we were hardly out of our beds.  but the boys fought bravely and repulsed and drove them from the field twice.  they then returned to the town to destroy our commissary stores. our skirmishes continued fighting until noon when it was perceived that it was useless to hold out any longer against such overwhelming numbers.  the Rebels then came into our camp and after taking every thing noticeable set fire to our tents and clothing and started with the prisoners in the direction of Chattanooga.  I do not wish to criticize the officers of the 3rd Minn Regt but I think they were scared into a surrender.  They had four pieces of artillery and nearly a full regiment of infantry and in the opinion of a great many could have defeated the enemy had they fought like the 9th Michigan.  We are now prisoners of war having been all paroled and for my part we shall never be exchanged."  Letter is not signed and may be incomplete possibly due to being a POW. The letter was written in the hand of James H Smails as can be seen by examining the other letters in this lot. The letter has one edge tear and some stains.  The smudge in two areas is where someone, most probably a child penciled over the word but I was able to erase a lot of it.    

The second listing is a two page legal sized blue rag letter, sent from Muldraugh Hill, Camp Blair which was a Union encampment and training facility.   The letter is dated January 8th 1862 shortly before the first Battle of Murfreesboro. Some breaks at the folds and a couple of stains.  You can see small holes when held to the light not affecting the content.  Signed by J M Smails. I am furnishing a partial transcript of the letter, giving the most interesting content.

The letter is addressed to My Cousin 

"I am pleased with the life of a soldier.  I have been the least sick so far and if you could see me I guess you would think there was no danger of my being so very soon for I never was so busy in my life.  The health of the Regiment has improved very much since I wrote last.  On Saturday six companies left this camp and marched to a place called Nolin which is about thirty miles from West Point-as soon as another Regiment comes here we expect to follow.  At present our camps looks desolate... I can tell you it will be with pleasure that we join the regiment.” 

The third letter is a three page letter dated June 20th 1862 and is written from Murfreesboro, Camp Park??, again written to his cousin.

"I have been completely tired out with our recent long marches...I have had my first initiation into the hardship of a soldiers life...Our Regiment left camp on the 29th of May and little did we think we were to have forced marches for the next sixteen days over mountains, through valleys and under the heat of a burning Southern sun.  A distance of four hundred miles before we returned to it again. but we did it and in my opinion accomplished comparatively little.  although we had the satisfaction of a few shots at the Secesh and the pleasure of seeing them get out of the city as fast as they could comfortably and I think a little faster than was agreeable to the most of them."

"The Brigade to which our Regmt is attached arrived at Chattanooga on Saturday night June 7th and on Sunday Morning the 9th Mich was ordered forward and at fifteen minutes past here we commenced firing upon the enemy which were upon the opposite side of the River but as the distance was almost to great for our small arms the fire was not very effective and the fighting was done principally with artillery.Our cannons soon silenced the Artillery of the Rebels and in the afternoon they evacuated the city we expected to go over and occupy it but the General Commanding said the objective for which we came had been accomplished and we immediately commenced our homeward march we reached Murfreesboro just sixteen days from the time we started. having crossed the Cumberland Mountains four times since our return we have removed our camp and I think we have if anything a pleasanter one than before." The rest of the content is personal lamenting the marriage of his girl friend.  Signed by J M Smails, Murfreesboro Tennessee.

The last letter of substance is three and a half pages and is written from Fort Independence, Boston Harbor, dated May 12th 1863.  Fairly large separation at one of the center folds, along with a small edge tear.  It is also addressed to his cousin.  Full signature but the gremlin with a pencil has blackened his initial and last name.
   
Smiles begins his letter explaining why he had not written sooner.  "...I have several times been within a few miles of your home, while the 27th infantry was at Cincinnati.  I was there twice, looking for deserters, but did not have time to visit you.  I was stationed at Detroit for some months on recruiting service for the regular army...”I have been in the field but little since I was taken prisoners, luckily for me I was detached from the Regiment and ordered to report at this post for duty.  It is really a delightful place only a mile and a half out in the Harbor and but a few rods from the main channel, and we have such a fine view of all vessels from our ocean steamship down to the pleasure yacht, some of which are passing continually.... The Regiment is now in Virginia and participated in the late Battle at Fredericksburg.  A good many from my company were killed and sounded, some of them very intimate friends, how fortunate that I am so far from the fields of slaughter...Rest in personal.  Signed James H Smiles with the initial and last name blotted out with pencil. 

As noted I have not scanned all of the pages of the letters.  Only one of the covers appears to belong to a letter, the Forrest raid one.  The dealer I purchased this lot from found them in her Aunt's estate but clearly some were lost over the years.

The last scans show all of the covers which came with the lot.  The first one shown may belong to the Forrest Raid letter, The second one has a faint cancel from Boston Mass with the stamp cut off and only part of the Paid showing.  The third is from Cincinnati Ohio with a clear and fancy cancel.  The next has a clear cancel from Boston and a fancy cancel over the stamp.  It is separated on three sides and nearly separated at the bottom.  Finally there is the back of one letter with a stamp and his finger print pressed in it.


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General David Hunter Letter From Port Royal-Excellent Content
Item #: NEW-0013122

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No paypal on this item, though payment plans can be arranged.

This is an eight page letter on two fold out letter sheets. The letter is legible and in good condition, except for a one and a half inch separation at the fold. I have shown the first and last page in the scans. 

The letter is dated April 15th (1862) and is written to his wife, Ri.  Major General David O Hunter served on the Union side. His history follows the transcription.  It is a very long letter so I have cut out some of the personal content. Almost all of the content deals with preparations for battle, life on the islands, and there is a hint of what would become a cause of Hunter’s, the abolition of slavery.  

"This day week we went for the second time to Tybee Island, expecting to open fire on Wednesday the 9th but finding things not quite ready I postponed it to the 10th.  We were gone five days and very uncomfortable days they were, for we had no accommodations on shore, and on the steamer, where I had a beautiful cabin, bath room, and really all the modern improvements, it was so rough that I could not keep from being sea sick.  A north east gale has been blowing for several days, and the sea has washed up within two feet of our house, and I find it underminding the little garden of geraniums, roses and cactuses...The fall of Pulaski is going to make quite a change in the notions of our old ? with regard to the value of our old forts.  Col. Totten wrote Gen Gillmore, or rather Gen Totten the Chief Engineer wrote him that to breach the wall from Tybee Island, out nearest battery being near a mile off, was simply impossible, and that the ammunition would be completely wasted.  Other great engineers expressed the same opionion.  Gen Robert E Lee of the Rebel Army, wrote Col. Olmstead, the Rebel Commander of the Fort that we might fill up the interior of the Fort with iron from our mortars, but that he might rest content we could never breach is walls.  I find the water here does not agree with me, as it is somewhat brackish, and also sulphury, but as long as I can get ice I shall of course avoid bad water.  I have too, plenty of congress water and plenty of good claret...  

This is a cheerful lively place.  All the Navy ships not immediately employed in the blockade are anchored here.  The Wabash, one of the largest and finest Steamers in the Navy is Commodore Du Pont’s flagship and drawing a great deal of water.  This is the only harbor she can enter on this coast-the result is she is here all the time.  I look out from my windows...on the pier, where vessels are always discharging, and on the harbor, where from twenty to thirty vessels (part steamers) are always riding at anchor...Commodore Du Pont and myself are getting on nicely-I invited him to send us a hundred men to assist in making our Batteries at Pulaski, and this pleased them very much.  On my return they had all their men up in the rigging, to cheer us as we passed.

I had a nice ride today and went to a plantation on the island of Hilton Head, (this island) about five miles off.  This, I suppose, is a pretty fair specimen of the places on this, and the neighboring Islands.  I found seventy Negroes on the place-the white family had run off the first arrival of the troops here, taking with them what they could pick up in a hurry.  They were probably entirely depending on this plantation for a support, and are now living on the charity of their friends...The Negroes are working on their old plantations, under charge of men sent by the Treasury Department from the North.  I feel the plan is not a good one, but I shall not find fault with it till I have had time to look full into its workings.

This Island is about fifteen miles long and has on it a number of plantations, all in about the situation I have described.  The roads are good, and the young men of my staff are all fond of riding, so I think for the sake of the exercise and seeing the country, I shall visit all the plantations.  We have plenty of our old Mexican enemy, the fleas.  A man brought a caterer two drum fish weight 40 or 50 pounds each.  Love.  Most affectionately, your D Hunter general in the Rebellion. (signed on the left edge).   

Here is a brief history on Hunter that is relevant to the period in which this letter was written. http://www.nps.gov/fopu/historyculture/david-hunter.htm

In March 1862  Hunter was transferred again to command the Department of the South.

Hunter arrived at Hilton Head, South Carolina, in March 1862. Preparations to retake Fort Pulaski in the Savannah River from Confederates were already underway. Hunter sent a flag of truce to the fort that was immediately ignored. Union troops opened fire on Fort Pulaski on April 10, 1862, and within 30 hours had forced the surrender of the massive fortress.

As the Commander of the Department of the South, Hunter made a pronouncement that caused controversy across the United States. Hunter, a strong advocate of arming blacks as soldiers for the Union cause, issued General order No. 11, emancipating the slaves in Georgia, South Carolina, and Florida.

General Order No. 11 - HDQRS Dept. of the South, Hilton Head, Port Royal, S.C.

"The three States of Georgia, Florida and South Carolina, comprising the military department of the south, having deliberately declared themselves no longer under the protection of the United States of America, and having taken up arms against the said United States, it becomes a military necessity to declare them under martial law. This was accordingly done on the 25th day of April, 1862. Slavery and martial law in a free country are altogether incompatible; the persons in these three States — Georgia, Florida, and South Carolina— heretofore held as slaves, are therefore declared forever free."

Maj, General David Hunter
1862

After General Order No. 11, Hunter began enlisting black soldiers from the occupied districts of South Carolina and formed the first such Union Army regiment, the 1st South Carolina (African Descent),which he was initially ordered to disband, but eventually got approval from Congress for his action. This order was quickly rescinded by Abraham Lincoln, who was concerned about the political effects that it would have in the border states, driving some slave holders to support the Confederacy. (Lincoln's own Emancipation Proclamation was announced in September, taking effect in January 1863.) Nevertheless, the South was furious at Hunter's action and Confederate president Jefferson Davis issued orders to the Confederate Armies that Hunter was to be considered a "felon to be executed if captured."   

http://www.drbronsontours.com/bronsongeneraldavidhunter.html  I found this link the most helpful on Hunter.  It seems he was better known for his friendly relationship with Abraham Lincoln which led to several important assignments including presiding on the court-martial of Fitz John Porter and presiding at the trial of the Lincoln conspirators.  He also ordered the burning of the buildings of the Virginia Military Institute and made strenuous efforts (some opposed by Lincoln)  to free slaves and arm them for the Union cause.   

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1862-Wayne Co Pa-Draft Notice-Substitute-Desertion
Item #: NEW-0013081

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Interesting set of documents relating to the conscription of David S Mitchell of Damascus Township.  

The first document is on blue rag paper and measures around 7 by 4 inches, repaired on the back with scotch tape.  This form notifies Mitchell that he is liable for military service.

The second little document is on rag paper which has been extensively repaired with scotch tape on the back.  Issued from Wayne County Pennsylvania, Honesdale Pa, October 1862. "YOU WILL PLEASE TAKE NOTICE, That you have been DRAFTED into the Military Service of the United States, and that you are required by Law to report yourself to me at Honesdale within five days from the date hereof."

The final document is dated Nov 1862 from Camp Philadelphia, stating that Mitchell had furnished a substitute by the name of Henry Duncan and that he was enlisted for three years.  Signed by Col Lumuel Todd, Recruiting Officer.

Evidently Duncan took the money and ran as he is listed in the Civil War Database having deserted 5 days after his enlistment with E Company Pa 3rd Heavy Artillery.  



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Rebel Raid-Gettysburg-1864-Citizen Letter-Nice Cover
Item #: NEW-0013072

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Four page letter that Ellie Bailey wrote to her cousin Jennie Henderson in Washington County Pennsylvania, dated Jan 19, 1864. Very nice cover with a clear cancel from Mechanicsburg Pa.  Bullseye cancel  The letter primarily contains personal content but she also describes a visit where some of their horses were exchanged for a  raid where their horses were stolen.  "Jennie, you should have been here the last of June & first of July to see "our friends from the south", but we did have an exciting time in constant fear; though they were all very polite and gentlemanly that stopped here."  She goes on to describe how three of their horses were taken and given in exchange, "an old worn out US 
horse." "They flew to the mountains" with six of ours (horses) where they remained two or three days, when the mountains were searched."  Another paragraph written crosswise on the third page refers to the Battle of Gettysburg the year before. "We could hear very distinctly the cannoning at Getysburg (her spelling), during the three days battle.  You should have been her to see the crowd go up to see the field after the battle.  One morning before breakfast ..more than thirty buggies, 4 carriages passed."

It's confusing if both of her description of events happened the year before, or if the raid she describes had just happened.  The rest of the letter appears to be personal content and impossible for me to read due to the cross writing.


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1864-Union Document-Where is Waldo?
Item #: NEW-0012896

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Interesting document dated August 27 through Sept 11 which involves trying to locate private William H Harden, Co F 102 New York Volunteers.  Ten entries regarding this soldier and I'm not sure he was located in this document.  Glue residue on in one entry which was pasted on.  There is another small document pasted on the document. Here are some signatures that I can read- F R Stanley, Col commanding, George Claypoole, J M Welch, Charles A Coble (Cable) William Wright.  See scan, which is only the front side. 

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Augusta Georgia-End of the War-Provost Marshal General Form
Item #: NEW-0012759

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Short form, titled Head Quarters Department of State, Office of the Provost Marshal General, Augusta
Georgia,dated August 12th 1865.

Captain

You will turn over to the Treasury agent all property in your possession which is not commissary or quartermaster property.  The iron in your possession is held as ? property, excepting the scrap iron.

                                                                                                 By Command of  Major General Steedman 
                                                                                                              (signed by C.H. (can't read)   
                                                                                                         Bvt Brig Gen J  C ?
Signed by
Capt Alfred Cooley (175th N Y Infantry)
?
Washington Georgia

There is a large ink stain on the bottom of the page.                                                                    


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1866 Bradley Co Tn-Citizen's Claim and Oath of Allegiance
Item #: NEW-0012636

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This four page, front to back form is titled Claimant's Application and Oath of Allegiance, filled out but unsigned for William Kate (Cate). I'm not sure who filled out the form, possibly G A Ewing, an Attorney who evidently later absconded with the funds reimbursed to Cate. 

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Wartime Receipt for Goods Taken From Citizen-Cleveland Tenn
Item #: NEW-0012615

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Handwritten receipt with worn folds and stains acknowledging receipt of 8000 lbs of hay and 10 bushels of corn at Headquarters of the 2nd Cav Brig. Clev Tn, August 20, 1864 "which I promised to return, the QM at this place please return the amount borrowed at the earliest period practicable."  Signed Acty QM-2nd Cav 2nd Division. Note: This citizen, William Cate had to fight for reimbursement at the end of the war.
 

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Deposition Statement-Cleveland Tn Resident-Post War Claim
Item #: NEW-0012614

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Seven page pencil written deposition that was taken in William Cate's suit against the government for supplies used by the Federal government.  The year is not given. The statement of others verify that William Cate and one of his sons, Gus Cate, protected secreted Federal soldiers following a fight in Cleveland, fed them and led them to freedom.  Cate is verifying that he was a Union man, probably in question as he had a son in the Confederate Army.  Gus, his other son joined the Union army.   This was in relation to claim No. 20732. 

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1868-LH-Quartermaster Genl's Office-Signed Gen.James A Blue
Item #: NEW-0012603

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This letter is regarding a claim against the government by William Kate (Cate) to recover funds from goods that were taken by U S forces in occupied Cleveland Tennessee. The letter is magnificently signed by James A Blue, Deputy QM General and Bvt Brig General.

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1867 LH-Treasury Dept-Claims Against the Government
Item #: NEW-0012602

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One page letter relating to the claims of citizens from Cleveland Tennessee who had had property taken by the army during the war.  William Kate (Cate) was the attorney for Simeon Witt, James T Foster and Henry Gilreath.  Content is the usual bureaucratic run around. 

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1867 LH-War Dept-Refugees-Freedman-Abandoned Lands
Item #: NEW-0012601

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Official communication with the envelope addressed to William Kate (Cate) responding to claims Cate was making against the government.

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Letters-Brothers-Split Loyalties-Cleveland Tn
Item #: NEW-0012521

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This two letter lot was taken from a larger lot which contains letters from two brothers from Cleveland Tennessee-Bradley County.  The Confederate soldier was Henry Glaze Cate who was a Captain with Company C-36th Tennessee Infantry.  His brother was Gustavus A Cate who was with the 12th Tennessee Cavalry, a Union Regiment. History of the two units can be found at the end of the listing.

The listing begins with "H Cate" who writes from Knoxville on December 10th 1862 to his father, William Cate.  I have included the most interesting content.  "You seem to have quite singular notions about me having nothing to eat.  You are much mistaken, I am living very well but much obliged for your kindness.  Tell Ma that I have had a pair of pants made off of my jeans..." "We have had a couple of cases of smallpox here they are getting well.  I have vaccine matter in each of my arms now.  I will send you enough..to vaccinate all the family.  There is no panic here not half so much danger as Cleveland I expect. I have heard that salt is arriving at Cleveland.  I hop you will be able to get through.  Be sure to get your back rations and all you are allowed now"... I think E Tennessee will be held till the last should the enemy over run the entire county and Tennessee will be the last. 
Respectfully H Cate." Condition includes folds and small holes along some of the folds.

The second letter is written from Camp Griffin, 12th Tennessee Cavalry, May 10th 1864 written to his sister Morlena Cate. Letter opens with personal content.  "I have been stationed at Nashville for the last three months until the last few days we moved down to Section 51 on the Nashville and Northern ? Railroad ? from Nashville to Memphis.  We have nothing to do here but drink  We have to scout a little occasionally there is some few bushwhackers back here though not a great many..."I am sorry to hear of Father's having to go to work though the time has come when every man must do something. When I left home I did not expect to be gone but a very short time though I have had a right smart wild goose chase of it  I have waited a right smart while before I concluded to join the army  I was exposed a right smart to the weather and the danger crossing the mountain.  I did not know when I would get home.  I thought that I would be about as safe in the army as out of it  I expect you would rather I had not joined the army through taking everything in consideration I don't know as I could have done much better. We see some very jolly times and some very hard ones though I think I can stand it.  I have not had one day sickness since I left home.(goes on to discuss how Small Pox has affected the men) and closing comments.  Signed Your Brother G A Cate.   Condition is good except for the folds and writing is not as light as the scan shows.

                                                     The 12th Tennessee Cavalry (Union)
Organized at Nashville, Tenn., August 24, 1863. Attached to District of Nashville, Dept. of the Cumberland, to January, 1864. Defences of Nashville & Northwestern Railroad to April, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 4th Division, Cavalry Corps, Dept. of the Cumberland, to October, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 4th Division, Cavalry Corps, Military Division Mississippi, to December, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 5th Division, Cavalry Corps, Military Division Mississippi, to February, 1865. 1st Brigade, 5th Division, Cavalry Corps, Military Division Mississippi, to May, 1865. Dept. of the Missouri to October, 1865.

SERVICE.-Scout to Florence, Ala., July 20-25, 1863 (Detachment). Duty at Nashville and on Nashville & Northwestern Railroad at Pulaski, Tenn., till November, 1864. Duck River April 22, 1864. Scout in Hickman and Maury Counties May 2-12. Lincoln County June 14. Scout from Pulaski to Florence, Ala., July 20-25 (Detachment). Triune August 3-4. Florence August 10. Operations against Forest in North Alabama and Middle Tennessee September 16-October 10. Richland Creek, near Pulaski, September 26. Pulaski September 26-27. Nashville Campaign November-December. On line of Shoal Creek November 5-20. Campbellsville and Lynnville November 24. In front of Columbia November 24-27. FranklinNovember 30. Battle of Nashville December 15-16. Pursuit of Hood to the Tennessee River December 17-28. West Harpeth River December 17. Spring Hill December 18. Rutherford Creek December 19. Curtis Creek December 19. Lawrenceburg December 22. Lynnville and Richland Creek December 24. King's Gap, near Pulaski, December 25. At Gravelly Springs, Ala., till February, 1865. At Eastport, Miss., till May. Moved to St. Louis, Mo., May 15-17, thence to Rolla, Mo., June 20-26, and to Fort Riley, Kan., June 29-July 8. Powder River Expedition July to September. Mustered out October 7, 1865.

Regiment lost during service 5 Officers and 28 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 2 Officers and 191 Enlisted men by disease. Total 226.

36th Regiment, Tennessee Infantry (Confederate)

36th Infantry Regiment was formed at Knoxville, Tennessee, during February, 1862. Men of this command were from Knoxville and Bradley, Hamilton, and Marion counties. It served in the Department of East Tennessee and took part in the Cumberland Gap operations. In June it disbanded; some of its members were then transferred to the 35th, 43rd, and 63rd Tennessee Infantry Regiments. The field officers were Colonel Robert J. Morgan, Lieutenant Colonel John A. Dunn, and Major William A. Camp.

Note:  The 36th was disbanded very early in the war due to excessive desertions.  Undoubtedly Henry joined one of the three Regiments listed but is unknown which one.

 


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68th Indiana Infantry. Letter- Wheeler's Raid on Ft Donelson
Item #: NEW-0012200

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Three pages of content written from Nashville Tennessee, Camp Mitchel, Feb. 1863 and signed O C Hudson of the 68th Indiana Infantry.  The writing is not faint despite the appearance of the scan. Most of the content deals with the status of a relative who was in a hospital in Nashville and reporting that he would continue to check on him.  Mention was made of General Wheeler's raid on Ft. Donelson. "It was reported yesterday that the rebels made a dash on Ft Donelson night before last and we whiped (sic) them out very nicely and captured 400 prisoners."  General Forrest took part in this unsuccessful attack which resulted in Forrest swearing that he would never serve under Wheeler again.

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186- Circular-Recruitment of Colored Regiments
Item #: NEW-0012150

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This little circular is blank but was sent to would be recruits who had not completed their application for admission to the Free Military School which was established by the Recruitment Committee.  Philadelphia

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1863 Union Letter-Camped on Farm of John M Botts
Item #: NEW-0011962

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Two pages, front to back, along with civil war cover postmarked Washington D C and with a bulls eye cancel. Dated November 14th, 1863 from a Camp near Brandy Station 1863.  Unsigned.  The letter was very difficult for me to read although it is not as light as it appears on the scan. Written content vertically and horizontally on the same page makes my brain shut down.  Here is what I could read, "We are camped on the farm of John M Botts the great champion of liberty in these parts-the Confederate army have done all they could to destroy it."  John M Botts, was arrested by the Confederate army for being a Union spy and imprisoned in Castle Godwin.  Actually although he was a Unionist he later criticized and blamed Lincoln for starting the Civil War.

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Soldier's Back Pay-Bounties Forms
Item #: NEW-0010850

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Two form from the United States Claim Agency from; Grand Rapids dated March 1863 which spells out the payments some soldiers were eligible for and how to apply for them.  The first document measures 8 by 5 inches and the smaller one is five by five inches.  Light rag paper.

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Andersonville-96th Illinois Vols-List of Deaths-Grave Headstones
Item #: NEW-0010841

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This list of soldiers who died at the prison camp in Andersonville Georgia was taken from the prison records by Joseph Schwri from the 96th Ill Regiment.  They are listed by the number of their grave, name, company, disease they died from, and the date of death.  Also included is a list of "Graves requiring Headstones. The following are from the list of deaths: A (Alberto) Wheelock, William McCrady, Charles Menzimer, H Slosher, ?  H (Hugo) Rodenberger, L (Loughlen) Madden, John Kirby, J (Joseph) Leekley, Charles Strum.

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1862 Letter-Union Soldier Letter-Life of an Infantry Man
Item #: NEW-0010833

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This is a four page letter dated July 8th 1862 from a Camp near Lagrange County Tennessee from an unknown soldier to his wife. I'm assuming that he was from Indiana from comments he made in the letter.  (Pleasantville-Carr Township).
The content is quite reflective of the camp life and hardships of the common foot soldier.

Here is the content:

Your letter of the 19th of last month was received this morning found me.  Well, except my feet which were about wore out from the effects of another march to Holly Springs and back again to the same camp.  We left on the 30th that day I sent you a letter just before we started on the march also one about the 22nd of last month from the Camp south of ?Well I have nothing worthy of note to write unless it be a few items as they come into my mind as I write, on the 30th of June we left this camp, after sending out tents & knapsacks up to Lagrange until we would return, the hot rays of the sun poring down on the sand which was hot enough to cook eggs in about 3 minutes, well we marched into town, then South on the Holly Springs roads.  We were then satisfied where was marching to.  That night we got to Lamar Mississippi about 19 miles South of Lagrange where we camped for the night being very tired.  This place is on a sand hill looks like Pleasantville in Carr Township with the exception of a two story brick house which look like it may have been used for a school house that morning.  We were in line of march by daylight.  On we marched till we came to a small creek one mile south of Hudsonville and within about 3 miles of Holly Springs.  Here we stopped to camp in the edge of a large cotton field and cornfield that evening Hiram and I went out on a scout for blackberries and potatoes, both of which we got plenty, next morning we was out again got another lot of potatoes  by this time all the potatoes on one Plantation was about cleaned out, back in camp, ? The long roll beat for to fall into line of battle, many of the boys were scattered off as far as two miles from camp, it was fun to see them come in on double quick time, we stand in line of battle ..about one and a half hours looking for the enemy to attack us on our left wing, what caused the alarm was one of the Ill Regiment had been out on a scout and ? playing marshal music through the thick dust, our cavalry scouts seeing them advancing took them for the rebels coming on to us.  July 3rd our teamsters were all out with their wagons, under a heavy guard of Cavalry and Infantry, foraging.  Come into camp in the evening loaded with corn & fodder and meat, General Lawmans (Lauman?)Aide was shot by some rebel citizens not more than about two or three miles from camp also the Quarter Master and two other men of the 28th Ill were shot at the same time and place, they were concealed in the bushes and usual got away.  4th of July boys were making their wishes generally nearly all wished they were home to enjoy the 4th.  When evening came after lying about in the hot sun all day a dispatch came that Richmond was taken with 50,000 prisoners this news caused a general jubilee among us.  The same afternoon we were on a picket, that is our company, next day we were relieved by Co H.  This evening we got news from Richmond that the rebels were driving Mc Cleland (sic) back from the position he had taken and all of his heavy siege guns, this made us feel very sad, indeed, next day 6th got orders to march, filed right on to the same road we came, we concluded we were then on our way back to Lagrange, dark brought us back to Lamar, here we lay down very tired, next morning about sunrise we were in line of march, got to the creek by two o’clock where we halted to rest till sundown, here we had a good wash in the creek, evening we marched back to this camp where we now are camped on the same ground.  The weather is very hot  (end of the letter, perhaps missing the rest or may have been mailed as is.)





   


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1863-Union Circular-Chaplains Must Be Present-Burial of the Dead
Item #: NEW-0010669

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This circular was written from the 1st Division, 3rd Corps on February 11, 1863.  Here is the content:  "The Brigade Medical Director will send at once to the Division Hospital those men in the Regimental Hospital that are very sick and need special attention. The Chaplains of the Division will meet at the Division Hospital on the 12th at noon and make arrangement to have divine services at the Hospital and to give proper attention to the physical and mental wants of the invalids.  A chaplain will be in attendance at the burial of the dead.  By Command of Brig Gen Ward" 

Long legal sized paper with folds and some staining as can be seen in the scan.

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1865 Union Soldier Letter-Corps Cover-Postage Due Stamp
Item #: NEW-0010611

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This four page letter was mailed in January 1865 from Camp Wainwright Va.  I can't quite make out the name but it appears to be Chopin.  The addressee appears to have the same last name of the writer.  Cover was cancelled in Washington D C and bears the symbol of the Corps badge of the soldier.  Content has no war news. Readable.  There is a separation on the middle fold which goes through one half and beginning on the other half.

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1865 Letter-Union Soldier-Nashville
Item #: NEW-0010013

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Letter is dated May 1865 and the signature appears to be S ? Person and is addressed to his sister Harriett Hull from Beverly Washington County Ohio.  Nice clear cancel from Nashville and a fancy cancel I have not seen before-leaf?

Two pages of personal content with only a couple of references to the waning days of the war.  A couple of small holes at the folds. The letter is difficult to read due to phonetic spelling etc. "was glad to hear that ? had got his discharge."  "I have answered every letter that ever got from you even so they must have been lost even it seem like you had forgot me  but still we will make it all wright if i live to get home" "The papers says that all the one years men is to report to there on State Capitol and be mustered out and if this is the case I think we will be home in 6 weeks and then I learned it say that every man could go home and libel to be called in between this then our time is ?" More but I give up.

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Document-Camp Douglas 69th Illinois Prisoner Exchange
Item #: NEW-009074

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This lot consists of two items. The first is a letter from Captain A Lash of Co A, 69th Illinois Volunteers giving a report to Col. Joseph H Tucker describing everything involved in his task of taking Confederate prisoners from Camp Douglas near Chicago to Vicksburg Mississippi. Accompanying the letter is a "list" entitled "Aggregate of Prisoners accompanying Capt A Lash, Jr, 69th Illinois Vols., Sept. 3rd, 1862". The list contains only numbers of Confederate soldiers, divided by their regimental companies. There are six "groups" of prisoners: 57th Tennessee, 3rd Mississippi, 7th Texas, Maury's Artillery, and "New Mexicans." This is the first document I have ever seen involving Confederate soldiers from the state of New Mexico. The letter is three and a half pages with folds and a stain. Only the first page is shown in the scan but the transcript follows. A transcript of the letter can be seen in the scan.

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Battle of Franklin-Battle of Nashville Letters-Great Battle Content
Item #: NEW-008803

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No paypal on this item though payment plan is fine. Three great letters written by Captain Brad F Thompson of the 112th Illinois Infantry. The first letter is written in pen and is quite legible and clean. The other two short letters were written in haste, in pencil following the battles. Of interest also is that Brad Thompson wrote a rare regimental history of the 112th printed in 1885.   
     The following is a partical transcript of the longest letter, three pages though only the first page is shown in the scan. Headquarters 112th Reg Ill Vol Inf Fort Negley-Nashville Tn Dec 7 1864 My Dear Wife, Personal content "I hope you had a good time going to town on the 30th, and succeeded in purchasing all you required. I wish I had been with you. That was the day we had such a terrible fight at Franklin; where men fell by thousands, and where shot and shell and grape and canister rattled thick and fast, where the whistling of bullets, the roar of cannon and the yells of the mad soldiers were enough to confuse any man’s senses, and confound his mind. Oh! What a terrible day, an awful day, and one that no man who was there can ever forget. Nearly five thousand men killed in one day; upon one field, every one of whom left a wife, a mother, a sister, or perhaps children to mourn his death. War is terrible: this war is more terrible than any other, and the end is not yet (in sight). Hood’s army continues to encircle the city, but whether he will risk an attack or will move off towards Kentucky is not yet apparent. If he goes to Kentucky, as some think he will, we will follow him. In that case we will have a long and arduous campaign before us-in the midst of a cold, wet winter. I hope Hood will attack us here, for I believe we can annihilate his army if he does"…rest is personal comments and some camp news. Yours truly, Brad F Thompson Second Letter 6 miles south of Nashville Dec 17 (1864) 8 o’clock A M My dear wife, We have been fight Hood two days, and have whipped him handsomely. We are moving on. All is well up to date. Love and kisses, Brad Third Letter Near Brentwood Tenn Dec 18th 1864 My Dear Wife: Our army attacked the Rebel army before Nashville on the 15th inst. We drove them considerably. On the 16th the Rebels were flanked, whipped, and completely routed. The Rebels are retreating as fast as possible, and we are following. Not a man hurt in the 112th. All well. Rainy and muddy. Hurrah! For Thomas. Hood is gone up. Will write soon. Love and kisses. In haste, Brad Thompson was born in Osceola Illinois, enlisting as a 1st sergeant in Co B, 112th Illinois Volunteer Infantry on Aug 12, 1862. He was promoted to 2nd Lieut March 31, 1863, served as adjutant from Nov 25, 1863, and promoted to captain April 25 1865, prior to his muster out June 20th 1865.

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Early Daily Citizen Reprint
Item #: NEW-007947

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Single sheet paper printed on wallpaper. I believe this to be an early facsimile issue of the famous paper produced by the Union army when Vicksburg was seized. Countless issues were made of the paper, many of which were distributed at GAR reunions. I believe this to be old because of the acidic bleed through visible on the front from the pattern of the wall paper. This has been encapsulated. There are some tiny edge tears as well as a large edge tear on the right hand side year the top. There is also a nip out of the top left hand corner. The color of the wall paper and the patten is so light that I could not capture it in a scan.

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Signal Corps R A-1865-Union Soldier Letter-Lewis A Egolf
Item #: NEW-007801

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Three and a portion of the fourth page letter signed L A Egolf, who with research is identified as Lewis A Egolf who served with the Signal Corps, Regular Army.

Letter is dated Jan 29, l865, written from Winchester West Virginia. Ink stains on the edges, no doubt happened in the ensuing years. Spine has separations as has the folds, one rather deep.

 "Respected Friend I am now seated to answer your welcome letter which I received last eve in your letter you stated that some of the one year men were at home and were catching deserters now my opinion is that if they were at the front and could not get a furlow they would go home too they do not know what it is to be in the army they are laying back on their bounty in Pennsylvania in that ..and they wish the war would last I suppose as long as they can get staying where they are now I would like to see them first in the front where they would be of some use they could be used to better advantage here for they might stop a ball from hurting some good man well the thing that I do not like is that those men are getting furlows and men who has been in the army for more than a year cannot get a furlow for my part I do not intent to try for one as I have been away from the corps pretty near three months and there are men who have not been off of dooty all summer and I would as soon see some of them go home as to go myself there is one of my tentmates going home tomorrow well there is nothing going on very fast here just now last week there as a skirmish between our cavalry and rebs and our men found one of our boys as starton to left (leave?) the station he was on about three weeks ago and was not heared of since until one of our scouts saw him. I would not like to be in his place for he will be shot if our men get him though he never was of any acount in the corps for he could neither flag nor drill but he will be kept on account of if he is caught for an example... closing comments.

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95th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry-1862 Letter-Battle Content
Item #: NEW-007800

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One and a half page letter written by Thomas D Ayers of the 95th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry Company F. "From Camp at the White House Kent County Virginia, May 17th 1862." Condition: Wear to the folds with holes along the folds not affecting content. Stains. See scans Dear Brother, I received your welcome and affectionate letter several days ago and would have answered it sooner only I had no post stamps. And you cant by (sic) one for love nor money. I suppose you heard about the fights with the rebels at West Point. Our regiment was not mentioned in the Philadelphia papers at all. As far as I can learn and they are the ones who ought to have a praise and not the Fire Zouaves for they were not within 2 miles of the battle all day. Our regiment lost about 10 killed and 15 or 20 wounded and the Division (Franklins) lost about 130 killed. Our regiment went into the fght and drove the rebels out of their entrenchments. Our company stood up like men and if it had not been for our captains skillful maneuvers we all would have been taken prisoner or killed so you may know we had a hard fight. But we are always ready for to fight the rebels and can whip them out of their boots..." Rest is personal Your Brother Thomas D Ayers

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4th N H Infantry-Letter-Col Louis Bell- KIA
Item #: NEW-007730

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Four full pages on great patriotic stationary dated Oct 23rd 1861 written by Louis Bell to his sister. Written "On board Steamship Baltic". The patriotic graphic of Fortress Monroe, Old Point Comfort and Hygeia Hotel Virginia takes up a third of the lettersheet. I purchased this letter in 1998 when the Bell estate was broken up. There is a large archive in the University of New Hampshire Library-Milne Special Collections and Archives which is on the web. This letter is addressed to Sallie whom he addresses as My dear Sister. It could be his sister-in-law, since his comments indicate that possibility. Bell was killed in action at Fort Fisher. (detail follow) The content is a mixture of personal and war information. I will give the content related to the war. "The commencement of this letter indicates my whereabouts, and the map X on the above shows my exact locality. I left Concord ...and got to Washington Thursday night and found that the Regiment had left for Annapolis that day. I followed on the next day and found the Regiment at last. Last Saturday evening we embarked on board this splendid steamship which contains without crowding all of us, and our horses, and our General (H G Wright) his staff and a number of big guns, shells for them...The fleet consists of near a hundred ships, some dozen or more of them are of the very biggest size, the Baltic, Atlantic, Vanderbilt, ?, Roanoke, Ariel, Empire City ? Queen, Philadelphia etc. Then the Minnesota Wabash and some five or six other ships of war as an escort to the transport ships, which contain the transports, some fifteen thousand men and a large quantity of material for siege and fortifying. Now the question is where is this great force to go-we have no information-but various guesses , my guess is Beaufort North Carolina. At all event we start tomorrow noon for somewhere-and the news of where we will go will reach you through the papers-probably before this letter does-for the government through over caution...will detain all letters till there is no chance of the enemy gaining any information from any correspondence that may take place between the fleet and various persons... We have had a little excitement this morning-first on account of a ship that went sailing by "without saying by your leave," and which various circumstances led the naval officers to believe not to be all right so one of the warship's little gunboats slowly turned around and sent a couple of shells after the ship which had the result of bringing her up to explain. Next a rebel gunboat steamed out from ? point and took a look at us-two or three of the gun boats whirled round and off went the rebels to their batteries again...I think that the government is perfectly right in not letting the expedition sail but keeping them on board ship-for after being cooped up for a week longer-the troops will be so glad to get on shore that a rebel battery will be of no account whatsoever. All the men are in capitol condition and spirits which leads me to have great hopes that the expedition may accomplish its design... I trust God may see fit to direct that I may return in safety to my home once more but if not I shall feel that I shall have died in the best cause the world has ever known and it will be no disgrace to my precious wife and child to have it said that the husband and father died fighting for his country...instructs her to address letters to Lieut Col Louis Bell, 4th New Hampshire Regiment, Gen Wrights Brigade, Brigadier Sherman's Division.. Here is some personal information about Louis Bell, who was the son of Governor Samuel Bell and his second wife, Lucy. He was born in Chester N H. At the outbreak of the Civil War, Louis Bell enlisted and was appointed Captain of Company A, First N H Reg of Infantry. He was later appointed Lieutenant Colonel to the 4th Regiment. General Sherman promoted Bell to Inspector General and Chief of staff in October of 1861. Bell succeeded to the command of Colonel in March of of 1862. In April of that year Col. Bell's regiment occupied the fortified town of St. Augustine. While there, Bell was relieved of his command for an alleged violation of government order but he was reinstated in September of 1862. In the winter and spring of 63 he commanded a brigade consisting of the Third and Fourth N H Reg and the Ninth and Eleventh Maine Reg. His brigade was involved in the sieges of Forts Wagner and Gregg on Morris Island and Fort Sumter, Charleston, S C. On May 9th 1864, Bell's brigade took part in the Battle of Petersburg and helped lay siege to the town from June to December of 1864. From Dec 7027 Bell led an unsucessful expedition against Fort Fisher in Wilmington North Carolina. A second expedition against Fort Fisher result ed in the fort's capture on January 15,1865. During the battle, Col Bell was mortally wounded and died January 16th, 1865. Bell was promoted to Brigadier General posthumously. His wife died months later.

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General Fitz John Porter-ALS-General-Barnard Bee-West Point Mates
Item #: NEW-007657

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This letter is dated March 20th 1851 from West Point and is signed by Fitz John Porter, then a professor at West Point. He is assuming the debt of one of his friends and former West Pointer, Barnard Elliott Bee. Porter became a General on the Union Side and Bee became a General for the Confederacy. Content is as follows: Sir, Bvt. Capt B E Bee told you or your agent to call upon me for the amount of a bill due you by him, and charged to me. Be pleased to send the amount of the bill and oblige Yours F J Porter. (Debt was $189.84). Condition: Brown ink on tin blue rag paper, folds, glued to the bottom is the old catalogue listing. Pencil and ink markings on the back. Here is a brief history on Porter: FitzJohn Porter was a career United States Army officer and a Union General during the American Civil War. He is most known for his performance at the Second Battle of Bull Run and his subsequent court martial. Although Porter served well in the early battles of the Civil War, his military career was ruined by the controversial trial which was called by his political rivals. Afterwards he worked intensely to restore his tarnished reputation for almost 25 years, when he was finally restored to the army's roll. Here is a brief history on Barnard Elliott Bee: Bee had a distinguished military career following his graduation from West Point in 1845 however he is best known for giving Stonewall Jackson his name Stonewall by pointing to General Jackson’s brigade, "standing like a stone wall". Bee sustained mortal wounds during the Battle of Bull Run (Manassas), the very battle that gave rise to his comment about Jackson.

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24th NY Cavalry Letter-Post War First Hand Report-Death of Col
Item #: NEW-007620

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Letter is written on the letterhead of P D Bricher, Attorney at Law and dated July 25, 1887 from Jersey Shore Pennsylvania. Two page, fantastic content which is a report of Col W C Raulston's attempt to free his men from a prison (No 6 Danville Virgina) Raulston was shot by a Confederate guard and later died from his wounds. This event was included in the book Portals to Hell. There are several references on the web covering the events described in this letter. "To the Survivors of the 24th Regiment N Y Cavalry" Comrades, I noticed this morning by reading an Elvira (?) paper, that a reunion of this regiment will be held in Buffalo, N Y July 27 & 28 -I hasten to write you for some information as to the date the Col of your regiment was killed at Danville Va, while as a prisoner of war, he with others, myself included, led the advance, in the attempt to break out of prison, and thus release all the prisoners, in the building. I have lost the data and would like very much if you could furnish me with the same. When we failed to break open the outer door of the prison, the prison guards allied and firing through the windows forced us to retreat up to the second floor of the building. While going up these stairs, if my memory serves me right is where the Col. (W C Raulston) was killed. I was at his side, or perhaps a step higher when he fell. With saddened hearts over the failure to break out and the shock of the tragic death of our brave leader caused many a brave man to shed tears that terrible day. No braver man than the Col of the 24th N Y Cav fell in the defense of his country during the war. His noble form, and daring look when giving us the command to follow him, I shall never forget. Comrades, while you refer to the roll of the honored dead of your regiment-drop a tear to his memory in behalf of the surviving prisoners of the war for whom he so gallantly lost his life, in his efforts to liberate them. I trust the allusion to your deceased comrades will not mar the many pleasing recollections of the war which crowd in upon the mind and memory of the survivors of the late unpleasantness and which grow brighter and more entertaining as they are portrayed by the peculiarly fitted story tellers in the language spirit and feeling of the days gone by. These reminiscences or stories are "chestnuts” that will keep and will always be enjoyed especially by a class of men, whose places in history can never be filled. Trusting Comrades I have not trespassed upon your time and feeling (although an entire stranger) a fraternal interest in you reunion by being associated with one of your members, under the circumstance related-I remain yours, fraternally, P D Bricher, Late Capt Co. F 13th Regiment Pa. Cav & Brevet Major This added after the closing, "The cavalry branch was detailed on the occasion of the break to lead the charge and when out of prison to capture all horses wagons etc and to make rapid advance to our lines for relief and from our army. The artillery and infantry were to seize all the arms of the guards, besides those in the arsenal, arm the prisoners which numbering over 3000 and to resist the enemy on the march to our lines. Our plans were well defined and would have been, if successful, on the the greatest event of the war and Col Ralston one of the greatest heroes. Here is a history of the 24th Reg N Y Cav taken from the web. Left the State: February 23, 1864 Consolidated with the 10th regiment of cavalry and designated 1st provisional regiment of cavalry, July 10, 1865 August 25, 1863, Col William C. Raulston, formerly Lieutenant-Colonel, 81st N. Y. Volunteers, received authority to reorganize the 24th Volunteer Infantry, then discharged by reason of the expiration of its term of service. September 25, 1863, this authority was modified to read that a regiment of cavalry, this, the 24th, should be organized. The regiment was organized accordingly at Auburn, and its companies were mustered in the service of the United States for three years, A, C, D and E, December 28, 1863; B, F, G, H and I, January 7; K and L, January 19, and M, January 26, 1864. The companies were recruited principally: A at Fulton and Phoenix; B at Utica, Auburn and Springfield; C at Oswego, Buffalo, Ogdensburg, Auburn and Volney; D at Buffalo, Southport, Baldwin, Orange, Elmira and Catlin; E at Oswego, Scriba, Hastings, Hannibal, Orwell and Parish; F at Buffalo, Taberg, Oswego, Rome and Utica; G at Orwell, Sandy Creek, Amboy, Oswego, New Haven and Lorraine; H at Rochester, Mt. Morris and Canandaigua; I at Oswego, Fulton, Parish, Palermo and Hastings; K at Syracuse, Onondaga, Oswego and Buffalo; L at Canandaigua, Auburn, Rochester, Mt. Morris, Rome and Utica; M at Buffalo, Auburn, Utica, Syracuse and Onondaga. The regiment left the State February 23, 1864, and served, dismounted, near Washington, D. C, in the 22d Corps from February, 1864; in Marshall's Provisional Brigade, 9th Corps, from May 5, 1864; in the same brigade, 1st Division, 9th Corps, from May 12, 1864; in the 2d Brigade, 3d Division, 9th Corps, Army of Potomac, from June 11, 1864; in the 2d Brigade, 1st Division, 9th Corps, from September, 1864; mounted in the 1st Brigade, 2d Division, Cavalry, Army of Potomac, from October 20, 1864; in 1st Brigade, 1st Division, Cavalry Corps, Army of Potomac, from May, 1865. Colonel William C. Raulston was captured by the enemy September 30, 1864; in an attempt to escape, of which he was the leader, he was shot, December 10, 1864, by a Confederate sentinel at Danville, Va., and from the effects of this wound died December 15, 1864, Under the command of Col. Walter C. Newberry the regiment was consolidated, company with corresponding company, with the 10th N. Y. Volunteer Cavalry at Cloud's Mills, Va., July 10, 1865; the new organization receiving the designation "1st Provisional Regiment N. Y. Volunteer Cavalry." During its service the regiment lost by death, killed in action, 1 officer, 72 enlisted men; of wounds received in action, 6 officers, 40 enlisted men; of disease and other causes, 1 officer, 133 enlisted men; total, 8 officers, 245 enlisted men; aggregate, 253; of whom I officer and 30 enlisted men died in the hands of the enemy

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1900 Official LH-Soldier Denied Pension-Desertion
Item #: CIV-007086

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There are two paper items in this lot regarding a widow being denied a pension for her husband who was thought to have deserted. Mildred Kidd has written W P Brownlow requesting his help in securing the pension. Brownlow has written Paul Devine for his help. Written on the official letterhead of the Committee on Census" House of Representatives. "The story that this man Kidd deserted to the enemy at Atlanta Ga seems to me to be wholly improbable. The Southern Confederacy was on its last legs at the time and no man was fool enough to do such a thing under the circumstances. I am inclined to the idea that this soldier was killed." W P Brownlow was the nephew of Parson Brownlow

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104th Ohio Infantry-Battle of Franklin-Battle Letter-Andrew Moon
Item #: NEW-007007

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No paypal on this item. This letter is by Andrew Moon of the 104th Ohio Infantry, Company C written from a Camp near Columbia Tennessee on December 24, 1864, Moon has used the back of the unused pages from a letter written to him by his sister who gives home front news. Here is the most pertinent content: ...We left Nashville on the 15th and attacked Hood driving him out of his works with but little loss to our Corps as we was on the right flank of the army. The 4th and 15th Corps which was in the center lost more men as they had to charge his stronger works, out regt has lost but one man since we left Nashville..." "We have been driving him (Hood) south ever since taking a large amt of prisoners (about 15 or 18 thousand) about 60 pieces of artillery in fact completely demoralizing his army which he claims to be the flower of the South but the papers will tell you more than I can." We are now about 48 miles south of Nashville and have Hood on full retreat across Duck River. I don't think we will be bothered with him anymore this winter I hardly think we will follow him any farther this winter. I think we will go to winter quarters soon. When we recaptured Franklin Tenn we found J A McCannon he had been taken prisoner after he was wounded and we did not know it we thought he had got off the battle field. They used him pretty rough while they had him, it was 6 days before he had his wound dressed-only as he done it himself. They took all this money, hat and boots..." Moon mustered into Company C on August 30 1862. He was wounded in action and discharged for his wounds on May 18,1865, less than a month before his regiment mustered out of service. The 104th Ohio saw action at Lexington, Atlanta, Rocky Faced Ridge, Dallas, New Hope Church, Kennesaw, Nashville, Franklin and Wilmington.

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Catalog Updated
6/7/2017 9:05:00 AM
Macon Daily Telegraph and Confederate Newspaper

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